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A Brief Account of the Chaldee Targums


From the Latin of Leusden


The author describes the Chaldee Targums, recommending them to readers such that they can use the Targums to convert Jews who use them as evidence for their own religion. The author also analyses several Targums.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-159-9
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 781
Publication Date: Aug 7,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 20
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-159-9
$34.00
$23.80

The article discusses the Chaldee Targums. The author defines the Hebrew root of the word “Targum” and explains why the Chaldee (Biblical Aramaic) translation survived during Babylonian exile. He describes what the Targums are: paraphrases of the Hebrew Bible except Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah and Chronicles. Some books have multiple paraphrases. Jews hold some paraphrases in higher esteem than others. The author advocates knowing the Chaldee paraphrases so Christians can convert Jews who follow them. He suggests places where the work may have been tampered with. After this introduction, he describes some of the Targums. He presents the possible authors for the Targum of Onkelos, one of the most ancient and esteemed. He discusses the Jerusalem Targum’s multiple Chaldee dialects and unknown author(s). “The Third Targum upon the Pentateuch” is ascribed to Jonathan son of Uziel, but this is said to be false. The author points to it as one that most contradicts the other Targums. He discusses Jonathan Ben Uziel’s Targum on the prophets as being one of the most valuable, then he describes the “Targum on the Five Smaller Books” and “The Targum upon the Psalms, Proverbs, and Job.”

The article discusses the Chaldee Targums. The author defines the Hebrew root of the word “Targum” and explains why the Chaldee (Biblical Aramaic) translation survived during Babylonian exile. He describes what the Targums are: paraphrases of the Hebrew Bible except Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah and Chronicles. Some books have multiple paraphrases. Jews hold some paraphrases in higher esteem than others. The author advocates knowing the Chaldee paraphrases so Christians can convert Jews who follow them. He suggests places where the work may have been tampered with. After this introduction, he describes some of the Targums. He presents the possible authors for the Targum of Onkelos, one of the most ancient and esteemed. He discusses the Jerusalem Targum’s multiple Chaldee dialects and unknown author(s). “The Third Targum upon the Pentateuch” is ascribed to Jonathan son of Uziel, but this is said to be false. The author points to it as one that most contradicts the other Targums. He discusses Jonathan Ben Uziel’s Targum on the prophets as being one of the most valuable, then he describes the “Targum on the Five Smaller Books” and “The Targum upon the Psalms, Proverbs, and Job.”

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