Search
Filters
With a written history of nearly five thousand years, the Semitic languages comprise one of the world’s earliest and longest attested families. This volume provides an overview of this important language family, including both ancient and modern languages. After a brief introduction to the history of the family and its internal classification, subsequent chapters cover topics in phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon. Each chapter describes features that are characteristic of the Semitic language family as a whole, as well as some of the more extraordinary developments that take place in the individual languages.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-860-1
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Gorgias Handbooks 19
Publication Date: Jul 2,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 110
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-860-1
$34.50

With a written history of nearly five thousand years, the Semitic languages comprise one of the world’s earliest attested and longest attested families. Well known members of the family include Arabic, Hebrew, Aramaic, Amharic, and Akkadian. This volume provides an overview of this important language family, including both ancient and modern languages. After a brief introduction to the history of the family and its internal classification, subsequent chapters cover topics in phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon.

Each chapter describes features that are characteristic of the Semitic language family as a whole, as well as some of the more extraordinary developments that take place in the individual languages. This provides both a typological overview and a description of more unique features. The chapters contain abundant examples from numerous languages. All the examples include morpheme by morpheme glosses, as well as translations, which help make these examples clear and accessible even to those not familiar with a given language. Concluding the book is a detailed guide to further reading, which directs the reader to the most important reference tools and secondary literature, and an up-to-date bibliography.

This brief introduction contains a rich variety of data, and covers topics not normally found in short sketches such as this. The clarity of presentation makes it useful not only to those in the field of Semitic linguistics, but also to the general linguist or language enthusiast who wishes to learn something about this important language family.

With a written history of nearly five thousand years, the Semitic languages comprise one of the world’s earliest attested and longest attested families. Well known members of the family include Arabic, Hebrew, Aramaic, Amharic, and Akkadian. This volume provides an overview of this important language family, including both ancient and modern languages. After a brief introduction to the history of the family and its internal classification, subsequent chapters cover topics in phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon.

Each chapter describes features that are characteristic of the Semitic language family as a whole, as well as some of the more extraordinary developments that take place in the individual languages. This provides both a typological overview and a description of more unique features. The chapters contain abundant examples from numerous languages. All the examples include morpheme by morpheme glosses, as well as translations, which help make these examples clear and accessible even to those not familiar with a given language. Concluding the book is a detailed guide to further reading, which directs the reader to the most important reference tools and secondary literature, and an up-to-date bibliography.

This brief introduction contains a rich variety of data, and covers topics not normally found in short sketches such as this. The clarity of presentation makes it useful not only to those in the field of Semitic linguistics, but also to the general linguist or language enthusiast who wishes to learn something about this important language family.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor Biography

Aaron D. Rubin

Aaron D. Rubin is Malvin and Lea Bank Professor of Jewish Studies, Classics & Ancient Mediterranean Studies, and Linguistics at Penn State University. He is the author of numerous books and articles, and co-editor of the recent Handbook of Jewish Languages (Brill, 2016).
  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Preface (page 7)
  • Acknowledgements (page 9)
  • Abbreviations (page 11)
  • Introduction (page 13)
  • 1 Languages and Classification (page 15)
    • 1.1 Akkadian (page 18)
    • 1.2 Eblaite (page 19)
    • 1.3 Modern South Arabian (page 19)
    • 1.4 Ethiopian Semitic (page 20)
    • 1.5 Arabic (page 22)
    • 1.6 Sayhadic (Old South Arabian) (page 25)
    • 1.7 Ugaritic (page 27)
    • 1.8 Canaanite (page 27)
    • 1.9 Aramaic (page 30)
  • 2 Phonology (page 35)
    • 2.1 Semitic Consonants (page 35)
    • 2.2 Semitic Vowels (page 38)
    • 2.3 Roots and Root Integrity (page 38)
  • 3 Morphology (page 41)
    • 3.1 Pronouns (page 41)
      • 3.1.1 Independent Pronouns (page 41)
      • 3.1.2 Suffixed Pronouns (page 44)
      • 3.1.3 Reflexive and Reciprocal Pronouns (page 45)
    • 3.2 Nominal System (page 46)
      • 3.2.1 Gender and Number (page 46)
      • 3.2.2 Nominal Case (page 48)
      • 3.2.3 Nominal State (page 50)
      • 3.2.4 Articles (page 52)
    • 3.3 Numerals (page 53)
    • 3.4 Verbal System (page 55)
      • 3.4.1 Verbal Stems (page 56)
      • 3.4.2 Voice (page 59)
      • 3.4.3 Verbal Tense/Aspect (page 60)
      • 3.4.4 Mood (page 64)
      • 3.4.5 Phrasal Verbs (page 67)
    • 3.5 Adverbs (page 68)
  • 4 Syntax (page 71)
    • 4.1 Word Order (page 71)
    • 4.2 Positional Relations (page 72)
    • 4.3 Agreement (page 74)
    • 4.4 Comparison (page 77)
    • 4.5 Coordination (page 78)
    • 4.6 Copular Clauses (page 79)
    • 4.7 Existential Clauses (page 81)
    • 4.8 Possession (page 82)
    • 4.9 Interrogatives (page 83)
    • 4.10 Relative Clauses (page 84)
    • 4.11 Subordinate Clauses (page 87)
  • 5 Lexicon (page 89)
  • 6 Guide to Further Reading (page 91)
  • Bibliography (page 97)
Customers who bought this item also bought

The New Syriac Primer, 2nd Edition

Series: Gorgias Handbooks 9
ISBN: 978-1-59333-325-6
A truly useful introduction to the Syriac language is a rare find. This practical initiation to the study of this ancient language of the Christian church speaks with clarity and authority. A fruitful integration of scholarly introduction and practical application, this primer is more than a simple grammar or syntactic introduction to the language. Written in a style designed for beginners, Kiraz avoids technical language and strives for a reader-friendly inductive approach. Readings from actual Syriac texts allow the student to experience the language first hand and the basics of the grammar of the language are ably explained. The book comes with downloadable material so that readers may listen to all reading sentences and text passages in the book.
$48.00

A Short Introduction to the Tiberian Masoretic Bible and its Reading Tradition

ISBN: 978-1-4632-0246-0
This book is intended to provide a quick introductory overview of the Tiberian Masoretic tradition of the Hebrew Bible and its background. It was this tradition that produced the great Masoretic codices of the Middle Ages, which form the basis of modern printed editions of the Hebrew Bible. Particular prominence is given to the multi-layered nature of the Masoretic tradition. The volume contains a section describing the Tiberian reading tradition, which is essential for a correct understanding of the vocalization system.
$27.30

Leshono Suryoyo: First Studies in Syriac

Series: Gorgias Handbooks 2
ISBN: 1-59333-190-8
John Healey’s, Leshono Suryoyo, is an introductory grammar for those wishing to learn to read Classical Syriac, one of the major literary dialects of Aramaic and the language of one of the main groups of Middle Eastern churches, including the Syrian Orthodox Church, the Church of the East, and the Chaldaean Church. From the first centuries of the Christian era, Syriac was used by the main theological and historical writers of this tradition (Ephrem the Syrian, Philoxenus of Mabbogh, Thomas of Marga, and Barhebraeus). It also continues to be used in worship.
$48.00

A Syriac Lexicon

A Translation from the Latin, Correction, Expansion, and Update of C. Brockelmann’s Lexicon Syriacum
ISBN: 978-1-60724-620-6
The second edition of Carl Brockelmann’s Lexicon Syriacum, published in 1928, is a highly reputable Syriac dictionary. However, its Latin language and the ordering of words according to triliteral Semitic roots make its use difficult for most students and scholars. This revised edition by Sokoloff renders meanings in English, arranges words alphabetically, and includes many useful tools on a CD.
$149.50