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This complete grammar of Code of Hammurabi is formally arranged and can be the basis for learning the rest of Akkadian grammar. Students of Biblical Hebrew or Arabic will find it a most convenient introduction to this sister language. The cuneiform text has been set out in columns opposite a phonetic transcription, thus enabling the comprehensive set of citations illustrating various points of Akkadian grammar to be easily checked within their wider linguistic context. This book, when used in conjunction with the author’s previous book “Hammurabi’s Laws”, makes it possible for a student to learn to read and understand the whole text of Hammurabi’s Stele.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0284-2
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Apr 30,2014
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 358
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0284-2
$65.00
$39.00

Probably more than anything else, a knowledge of Akkadian language and literature has taught the world of twentieth-century scholarship about the Bible within its Ancient Middle Eastern context. One of the most important sources of this knowledge stems from the many publications in the earlier part of that century concerned with the laws of Hammurabi. In his previous book on the subject the author provided a complete index of the vocabulary of that long inscription. He now provides a complete grammar, so that a student of Akkadian can learn the elements of the language by reading the stele as a whole.

The standard hand-copy of the cuneiform text is set out in columns opposite a phonetic transcription, thus the comprehensive set of citations illustrating various points of Akkadian grammar presented in subsequent chapters can be easily checked within their wider linguistic context. This is supplemented with an alphabetically arranged list of the phonetic values of all the cuneiform signs that occur in the text which includes Sumerograms as well as phonograms. The quality of the excellent original photographs of the stele taken soon after it had been excavated merits their inclusion as an appendix.

This book, when used in conjunction with the author’s previous Hammurabi’s Laws, makes it possible for a student to learn to read and understand the whole text of Hammurabi’s Stele.

Mervyn Richardson studied Semitic languages in England, principally at the University of Durham, but also at the University of London. His teaching career was spent at the University of Manchester. There he was very actively involved with the editing of the Journal of Semitic Studies. He currently works at Leiden University where he is an honorary research worker and is the author of the English edition of Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament (based on the German edition by L. Koehler and W. Baumgartener), and also of Hammurabi’s Laws.

Probably more than anything else, a knowledge of Akkadian language and literature has taught the world of twentieth-century scholarship about the Bible within its Ancient Middle Eastern context. One of the most important sources of this knowledge stems from the many publications in the earlier part of that century concerned with the laws of Hammurabi. In his previous book on the subject the author provided a complete index of the vocabulary of that long inscription. He now provides a complete grammar, so that a student of Akkadian can learn the elements of the language by reading the stele as a whole.

The standard hand-copy of the cuneiform text is set out in columns opposite a phonetic transcription, thus the comprehensive set of citations illustrating various points of Akkadian grammar presented in subsequent chapters can be easily checked within their wider linguistic context. This is supplemented with an alphabetically arranged list of the phonetic values of all the cuneiform signs that occur in the text which includes Sumerograms as well as phonograms. The quality of the excellent original photographs of the stele taken soon after it had been excavated merits their inclusion as an appendix.

This book, when used in conjunction with the author’s previous Hammurabi’s Laws, makes it possible for a student to learn to read and understand the whole text of Hammurabi’s Stele.

Mervyn Richardson studied Semitic languages in England, principally at the University of Durham, but also at the University of London. His teaching career was spent at the University of Manchester. There he was very actively involved with the editing of the Journal of Semitic Studies. He currently works at Leiden University where he is an honorary research worker and is the author of the English edition of Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament (based on the German edition by L. Koehler and W. Baumgartener), and also of Hammurabi’s Laws.

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M. E. J. Richardson

  • Contents (page 7)
  • Preface (page 9)
  • Introduction (page 13)
  • Text and Transcription (page 19)
  • Alphabetical List of Signs (page 103)
  • Overview of Grammar (page 129)
    • Script (page 129)
      • Ideograms and phonograms (page 129)
      • Transliteration (page 130)
      • Transcription (page 130)
    • Phonology (page 131)
      • Vowels and Semi-vowels (page 131)
      • Consonants (page 132)
      • Glottal Stop (page 132)
      • Other Assimilated Consonants (page 133)
      • Morphemic Gemination (page 134)
    • Morphology: Nouns (page 135)
      • Masculine Plural (page 135)
      • Feminine Singular and Plural (page 136)
      • Adjectives (page 136)
      • Pronominal Suffixes with Nouns (page 136)
      • Apposition (page 137)
      • Nominal Forms which Function as Verbs (page 139)
    • Morphology: Verbs (page 139)
      • Finite Verbs (page 139)
      • Verbal Roots: Weak and Strong (page 141)
      • Pronominal Suffixes with Verbs (page 141)
      • Secondary and Tertiary Themes (page 142)
      • Perfect Forms (page 142)
      • Subjunctive Forms (page 143)
      • Injunctive Forms (Precative and Asseverative) (page 143)
      • Imperative Forms (page 144)
      • Ventive Forms (page 144)
      • Stative Forms (page 144)
    • Morphology: Non-Declining Words (page 145)
    • Syntax (page 146)
    • Conjectural Errors and Variant Readings (page 147)
  • Detailed Grammatical Notes (page 149)
    • Phonology (page 149)
      • Ideographic and Syllabic Writing (page 150)
      • Vowels (page 150)
      • Semivowels (page 152)
      • Glottal Stop (page 152)
      • Consonants (page 154)
      • Consonantal Gemination (page 154)
      • Morphographemes (page 158)
      • Haplography (page 159)
      • Stress (page 159)
    • Nouns (page 160)
      • Gender (page 160)
      • Number (page 160)
      • Case (page 162)
      • Double Accusative (page 162)
      • Genitive (page 164)
      • Bound Forms (page 166)
      • Absolute State (page 168)
      • Possessive Pronominal Suffixes (page 169)
      • Pronouns (page 173)
      • Indefinite Pronouns (page 174)
      • Demonstratives (page 176)
      • Adjectives (page 177)
      • Nouns in Apposition and Substantivised Adjectives (page 178)
      • Numerals (page 178)
    • Verbal Forms with Nominal Inflection (page 179)
      • Participles (page 179)
      • Participles Marked with -um (page 181)
      • Participles Inflected as Bound Forms (page 181)
      • Participles in Rhetorical Style (page 183)
      • Infinitives (page 184)
      • Infinitives Inflected as Accusative (page 185)
      • Infinitives Inflected as Bound Forms (page 186)
      • Infinitives Inflected as Genitive (page 186)
    • Verbs (page 189)
      • G-Theme (Preterite) (page 190)
      • G-Theme (durative) (page 195)
      • Gt-Theme (page 199)
      • Gtn-Theme (page 200)
    • Derived Themes (page 201)
      • D-Theme (page 202)
      • Dt-Theme (page 204)
      • S-Theme (page 204)
      • St-Theme (page 205)
      • N-Theme (page 206)
    • Quadriliteral or Quinquiliteral Roots (page 209)
    • Perfect Forms (page 209)
    • Subjunctive Forms (page 213)
      • The Relationship of the Antecedent to the Subjunctive Verb (page 213)
      • Multiple Relative Clauses (page 215)
      • Unexpressed sa (page 215)
      • Other Subordinate Clauses (page 217)
    • Injunctive Forms (page 218)
      • Precative (page 218)
      • Asseverative (page 220)
      • Imperative (page 221)
    • Object Pronominal Suffixes (page 222)
    • Ventive Forms (page 224)
      • Ventive Forms in Subordinate Clauses (page 225)
      • Verbs with Ventive and Non-ventive Forms (page 225)
    • Stative Forms (page 225)
      • Transitive Verbs in the Stative (page 227)
      • Stative Forms in a Subordinate Clause (page 228)
      • Feminine Stative Forms in a Subordinate Clause (page 229)
      • Statives Marked as Ventive (page 230)
    • Non-Declining Words (page 230)
    • Enclitic Particles (page 256)
    • Syntax and Style (page 264)
      • Clauses and Sentences (page 264)
      • Sentence Boundaries (page 264)
      • Word Order (page 265)
      • Compound Sentences (page 268)
      • Complex Sentence (page 269)
      • Relative Clause (page 270)
      • Juxtaposed Clauses: Linked Asyndetically and with -ma (page 273)
      • Extraposition (page 277)
      • Rhetorical Style (page 279)
  • Glossary (page 285)
  • Bibliography (page 355)
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