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A Gift of Themistocles: The "Ludovisi Throne" and the Boston Relief


In this article Harriet Boyd Hawes, groundbreaking archaeologist, nurse, and relief worker, suggests that the reliefs are the adornments of a couch-altar that stood in the sanctuary which Themistocles restored for the Lycomids at Phlya..
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-450-9
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 221
Publication Date: Aug 4,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 33
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-450-9
$37.00
$22.20

The Ludovisi throne is one of the most famous works of early Classical sculpture, a white marble chair covered with bas relief, but the reasons for its creation and the purpose for which it was intended are both unknown. In this article Harriet Boyd Hawes, groundbreaking archaeologist, nurse, and relief worker, suggests that the reliefs are the adornments of a couch-altar that stood in the sanctuary which Themistocles restored for the Lycomids at Phlya, an origin that makes the artwork important for the history of art, the older religion of Greece, Orphism, clan-cults of Attica, and the background of Euripides. This article from one of the great minds of of the early century combines archeology and Classics to provide a compelling, if unprovable, connection between a pivotal moment in Greek history and a beautiful work of art.

The Ludovisi throne is one of the most famous works of early Classical sculpture, a white marble chair covered with bas relief, but the reasons for its creation and the purpose for which it was intended are both unknown. In this article Harriet Boyd Hawes, groundbreaking archaeologist, nurse, and relief worker, suggests that the reliefs are the adornments of a couch-altar that stood in the sanctuary which Themistocles restored for the Lycomids at Phlya, an origin that makes the artwork important for the history of art, the older religion of Greece, Orphism, clan-cults of Attica, and the background of Euripides. This article from one of the great minds of of the early century combines archeology and Classics to provide a compelling, if unprovable, connection between a pivotal moment in Greek history and a beautiful work of art.

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Harriet Hawes

  • A GIFT OF THEMISTOCLES: THE "LUDOVISI THRONE" AND THE BOSTON RELIEF: [PLATES II-V] (page 5)