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A Greek Fragment of Tatian's Diatessaron from Dura


With Facsimile, Transcription and Introduction


Discovered in 1933, a fragment of Tatian’s Diatessaron is published here with critical apparatus, a facsimile, and a transcription. The fragment, a discarded portion of a scroll with 14 surviving lines of text, was likely used in the worship of a third century C.E. chapel excavated at Dura Europos.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 1-59333-368-4
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 2
Publication Date: Oct 25,2006
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 48
ISBN: 1-59333-368-4
$27.20
$16.32

Discovered in 1933, a fragment of Tatian’s Diatessaron is published here with critical apparatus, a facsimile, and a transcription. The fragment, a discarded portion of a scroll with 14 surviving lines of text, was likely used in the worship of a third century CE chapel excavated at Dura Europos. As a harmony of the four canonical Gospels, Tatian’s Diatessaron is an important witness to the interpretation of the Gospels in the early church. This fragment is of significance as it represents a Greek version of a text also attested in Arabic, Latin and Dutch. Kraeling includes a table comparing these four versions. The fact that Greek is considered the original language of the text makes this manuscript fragment an essential piece of evidence for the Diatessaron as a whole. Kraeling also helpfully compares the Diatessaron with the text of the canonical Gospels.

Carl H. Kraeling (1897-1966) held a number of distinctive offices during his career. Among his notable positions were a professorship at Yale University and a period as the President of the American Schools of Oriental Research.

Discovered in 1933, a fragment of Tatian’s Diatessaron is published here with critical apparatus, a facsimile, and a transcription. The fragment, a discarded portion of a scroll with 14 surviving lines of text, was likely used in the worship of a third century CE chapel excavated at Dura Europos. As a harmony of the four canonical Gospels, Tatian’s Diatessaron is an important witness to the interpretation of the Gospels in the early church. This fragment is of significance as it represents a Greek version of a text also attested in Arabic, Latin and Dutch. Kraeling includes a table comparing these four versions. The fact that Greek is considered the original language of the text makes this manuscript fragment an essential piece of evidence for the Diatessaron as a whole. Kraeling also helpfully compares the Diatessaron with the text of the canonical Gospels.

Carl H. Kraeling (1897-1966) held a number of distinctive offices during his career. Among his notable positions were a professorship at Yale University and a period as the President of the American Schools of Oriental Research.

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Carl Kraeling