You have no items in your shopping cart.
Close
Search
Filters

A History of the Syrian Community of Grand Rapids, 1890-1945 (paperback)

From the Beqaa to the Grand


This book provides the first history of the old Syrian community of Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1890-1945, focusing on the slow process of ethnic acculturation during which community members developed a hybrid culture. Unlike some Middle Eastern immigrant groups, these Syrians were able to maintain their identity by establishing their own churches, which still exist today. At every opportunity this group is situated within the larger historical context, the decline of the Ottoman Empire, the French Mandate in Syria, the Progressive Movement, the Americanization program of the 1920s, the Great Depression and the two world wars.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0564-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Sep 2,2015
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 168
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0564-5
$70.00

From the Beqaa to the Grand provides the first history of the old Syrian community of Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1890-1945. The study focuses on the slow process of ethnic acculturation during which members of the community developed a hybrid culture, drawing on elements of the old and the new.
Orthodox Christians from neighboring villages in the Beqaa Valley made up the large majority of this community. Unlike some Middle Eastern immigrant groups, these Syrians were able to maintain their identity by establishing their own churches, which still exist today. A small number of Syrian Muslims also resided in the city from almost the beginning of immigration, and a chapter detailing this group is included.
The book begins with a discussion of conditions in the homeland that encouraged emigration during the two decades prior to World War I. As the Syrians settled into Grand Rapids, they became peddlers or worked in the local furniture factories. Their children and grandchildren became prominent businessmen and professionals, dentists and lawyers, contributing in vital ways to life in Michigan’s second city.
At every opportunity this group is situated within the larger context, relating how national and international developments, the decline of the Ottoman Empire, the French Mandate in Syria, the Progressive Movement, the Americanization program of the 1920s, the Great Depression and the two world wars, impacted its members. This history is enriched with material drawn from a 2006 visit to Lebanon and a stay in the villages from which most of the immigrants came.

From the Beqaa to the Grand provides the first history of the old Syrian community of Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1890-1945. The study focuses on the slow process of ethnic acculturation during which members of the community developed a hybrid culture, drawing on elements of the old and the new.
Orthodox Christians from neighboring villages in the Beqaa Valley made up the large majority of this community. Unlike some Middle Eastern immigrant groups, these Syrians were able to maintain their identity by establishing their own churches, which still exist today. A small number of Syrian Muslims also resided in the city from almost the beginning of immigration, and a chapter detailing this group is included.
The book begins with a discussion of conditions in the homeland that encouraged emigration during the two decades prior to World War I. As the Syrians settled into Grand Rapids, they became peddlers or worked in the local furniture factories. Their children and grandchildren became prominent businessmen and professionals, dentists and lawyers, contributing in vital ways to life in Michigan’s second city.
At every opportunity this group is situated within the larger context, relating how national and international developments, the decline of the Ottoman Empire, the French Mandate in Syria, the Progressive Movement, the Americanization program of the 1920s, the Great Depression and the two world wars, impacted its members. This history is enriched with material drawn from a 2006 visit to Lebanon and a stay in the villages from which most of the immigrants came.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
*
*
Bad
Excellent
*
*
*
*
ContributorBiography

James Goode

James F. Goode is professor of history at Grand Valley State University and former director of its Middle East Studies program. He received his PhD from Indiana University. He has published extensively on American foreign relations and the Middle East.

  • 978-1-4632-0564-5_FrontMatter (page 1)
  • Title of My Book (page 5)
Customers who bought this item also bought

Fâṭima, Daughter of Muhammad (second edition - paperback)

Second Edition
ISBN: 978-1-4632-3939-8
The only child of Muhammad to survive him, Fâṭima was from early times taken up by Shî’a Islam, for whose adherents she is the virgin mother, the heavenly intercessor with untold power before God’s throne, and the grieving mother of al-Husayn, the Shi’a's most important martyr. During her life she was impoverished and weak, neglected, marginalized, and divested of justice: but her reward in heaven comprises incalculable riches, all those in heaven will bow their heads to her, and her company will be the angels and the friends of God. Here, for the first time, her story is told.
$65.00

Myth, Text, and History at Sparta

Edited by Thomas Figueira
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0595-9
Three studies that offer close readings concerning the interaction of the source material on Spartan history with the unfolding of actual historical events. These contributions take the position that not only political, but also social, policies at Sparta, as well as the historical actors giving them shape, were intensely─and to an unusual degree─influenced by myth, tradition, and popular memory about the Laconian past.
$170.00

The Chronicle of Zuqnīn

Parts I and II. From the Creation to the Year 506/7 AD
Edited and Translated by Amir Harrak
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0663-5
The Chronicle of Zuqnin is a universal history beginning with the Creation according to the biblical account and ending with the time of the Chronicler, the years 775-776 AD. The author is most probably Joshua the Stylite, a contemporary of the Caliphs al-Mansur and al-Mahdi, who lived in the monastery of Zuqnin that was located near Amid, the Diar-Bakr of modern Turkey. Parts I and II contain compiled sources some of which survived only in this Chronicle. Sources include the Bible, Cave of Treasures, the Sleepers of Ephesus, Eusebius of Caesarea, Socrates, and the short Chronicle called Pseudo-Joshua the Stylite that deals with Sassanian-Byzantine warfare at the begging of the 6th century. Parts III and IV cover the years 488 and 775 AD. In this volume, Parts I and II, including the author’s dedicatory letter, are now published in an updated edition of the Syriac text and the first English translation.
$215.00

An Introduction to Syriac Studies (Third Edition)

ISBN: 978-1-4632-0713-7
This Introduction aims to provide basic guidance to important areas of Syriac studies. The relevance of Syriac studies to a variety of other fields is explored. A brief orientation to the history of Syriac literature is offered, and Syriac is set within the context of the other Aramaic dialects. A thorough discussion on important tools (Instrumenta Studiorum) is presented; topics include grammars, dictionaries, the Bible in Syriac, histories of Syriac literature, bibliographical aids and relevant series, periodicals, and encyclopedias. This Introduction should prove useful both for the student beginning Syriac studies and for scholars working in adjacent fields.
$39.00 $31.20