You have no items in your shopping cart.
Search
Filters

A Palimpsest: Rhetoric, Ideology, Stylistics, and Language Relating to Persian Israel


A volume of collected essays that explores what we can learn about the producers and readers of biblical books by looking into matters of language, rhetoric, style, and ideology. What do they teach us about these literati’s world of knowledge and imagination, about the issues they had in mind and the ways they came to deal with them through authoritative literature? The book includes essays on such issues as whether linguistic theories can solve literary-critical problems, on what is “late biblical Hebrew,” on parallelism and noun groups in biblical poetry, and the communicative meaning of some linguistic choices.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-584-1
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 11,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 343
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-584-1
$197.00
$137.90

This volume contains revised versions of papers presented at the 2006, 2007, and 2008 meetings of the European Association of Biblical Studies as part of the activities of a Research Programme devoted to the study of “Israel and the Production and Reception of Authoritative Books in the Persian and Hellenistic Periods,” and some additional contributions. The basic question that the volume explores through the different approaches and questions raised by the authors is what can we learn by looking into the matters of biblical Hebrew linguistics, rhetoric, style, and ideology about the producers and readers of these books. What do they teach us about these literati’s world of knowledge and imagination, about the issues they had in mind and the ways in which they came to deal with them through authoritative literature? The inclusion of perspectives drawn from linguistics in this conversation is particularly valuable, since they are often absent from this type of conversation. Thus, the book includes essays on such issues as whether linguistic theories can solve literary-critical problems, on what is “late biblical Hebrew,” on parallelism and noun groups in biblical poetry, and the communicative meaning of some linguistic choices. There are studies on aspects of language, style, rhetoric, or ideology in the books of Genesis (in particular ancestor ideology), Samuel, Jeremiah, Nahum, Esther, Ezra (1-6), and Nehemiah, as well as on the reconceptualization of YHWH Sebaot as YHWH Elohim. Philippe Guillaume, Jean-Daniel Macchi, Robert Rezetko, Dalit Rom-Shiloni, Francesca Stavrakopoulou, Ian Young and the three editors contributed essays to this volume.

This volume contains revised versions of papers presented at the 2006, 2007, and 2008 meetings of the European Association of Biblical Studies as part of the activities of a Research Programme devoted to the study of “Israel and the Production and Reception of Authoritative Books in the Persian and Hellenistic Periods,” and some additional contributions. The basic question that the volume explores through the different approaches and questions raised by the authors is what can we learn by looking into the matters of biblical Hebrew linguistics, rhetoric, style, and ideology about the producers and readers of these books. What do they teach us about these literati’s world of knowledge and imagination, about the issues they had in mind and the ways in which they came to deal with them through authoritative literature? The inclusion of perspectives drawn from linguistics in this conversation is particularly valuable, since they are often absent from this type of conversation. Thus, the book includes essays on such issues as whether linguistic theories can solve literary-critical problems, on what is “late biblical Hebrew,” on parallelism and noun groups in biblical poetry, and the communicative meaning of some linguistic choices. There are studies on aspects of language, style, rhetoric, or ideology in the books of Genesis (in particular ancestor ideology), Samuel, Jeremiah, Nahum, Esther, Ezra (1-6), and Nehemiah, as well as on the reconceptualization of YHWH Sebaot as YHWH Elohim. Philippe Guillaume, Jean-Daniel Macchi, Robert Rezetko, Dalit Rom-Shiloni, Francesca Stavrakopoulou, Ian Young and the three editors contributed essays to this volume.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor Biography

Ehud Ben Zvi

Ehud Ben Zvi is a professor in the Dept. of History & Classics at the University of Alberta. He has authored or (co)-edited about twenty volumes and written numerous essays primarily on ancient Israel, its intellectual history, social memory, historiography, and prophetic books.

Diana Edelman

Frank Polak

Francesca Stavrakopoulou

Philippe Guillaume

Dalit Rom-Shiloni

Robert Rezetko

Jean-Daniel Macchi

Ian Young

Ian Young is Associate Professor of Biblical Studies and Classical Hebrew at the University of Sydney.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Acknowledgments (page 7)
  • Abbreviations (page 9)
  • Diana V. Edelman, Introduction (page 13)
  • Dalit Rom-Shiloni, Group Identities in Jeremiah: Is It the Persian Period Conflict?Ž (page 23)
    • I. Introduction (page 23)
    • II. Stages in Babylonian Exilic Ideology (page 25)
    • III. Babylonian Exilic Ideology in the Book of Jeremiah (page 29)
    • IV. Conclusions: Is It the Persian Period Conflict? (page 55)
  • Diana V. Edelman, Ezra 1…6 as Idealized Past (page 59)
    • Introduction (page 59)
    • Prophetic Passages Used to Compose Ezra 1…6 (page 61)
    • The Reference to Jeremiah in Ezra 1:1 (page 65)
    • Implied Authorial Intention (page 68)
  • Francesca Stavrakopoulou, Ancestor Ideologies and the Territoriality of the Dead in Genesis (page 73)
  • Diana V. Edelman, God Rhetoric: Reconceptualizing YHWH Sebaot as YHWH Elohim in the Hebrew Bible (page 93)
    • Introduction (page 93)
    • —em TheologyŽ (page 99)
    • Kabod TheologyŽ (page 103)
    • Concluding Considerations (page 118)
  • Jean-Daniel Macchi, The Book of Esther: A Persian story in Greek style (page 121)
    • The Greeks and the History of Persia (page 123)
    • Persian World and Practices in the Book of Esther and in the Greek Literature (page 124)
    • Queen Vashti Refuses to Come to the King (Esth 1:10…12) (page 126)
    • Judges and Kings Marriage (Esth 1:12…20) (page 126)
    • Esther Becomes Queen of Persia (Esth 2:1…18) (page 127)
    • Hamans Wrath (Esth 3:1…5) (page 129)
    • The Queen Risked Life to Contact the King (Esth 4:1…5:2) (page 131)
    • The Queen Manipulates People At the Court (Esth 5:3…14; 7:1…8) (page 133)
    • Presents to the Benefactor (Esther 6) (page 134)
    • Massacre and Festival (Esther 8…9) (page 135)
    • Results and Conclusion (page 136)
  • Philippe Guillaume, Nahum 1: Prophet, Senet, and Divination (page 141)
    • Nahum 1, Alphabetic? (page 141)
    • The Senet of Twenty Houses (page 143)
    • Nahum 1 and the Senet Grid (page 146)
    • The Game of Twenty Squares and Divination (page 158)
    • Sortes Sanctorum (page 165)
    • Prophets in Chronicles (page 169)
    • Prophetic Collection as Oracle Collection (page 169)
  • Frank Polak, Verbs of Motion in Biblical Hebrew: Lexical Shifts and Syntactic Structure (page 173)
    • 1. Some Notes on Semantics and Syntax of Motion Verbs (page 175)
    • 2. Lexical Shifts (page 180)
    • 3. Syntactic Patterns: Verbs of Motion Indiscourse (page 199)
    • 4. Verbs of Motion and Semanto-Syntactic Patterning (page 209)
  • Frank Polak, Parallelism and Noun Groups in Prophetic Poetry from the Persian Era (page 211)
    • 1. Haggai (page 212)
    • 2. Zechariah 1…8 (page 226)
    • 3. Zech 11:4…14:21 and Malachi (page 239)
    • 4. Poetic Prosodic in Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi (page 246)
  • Robert Rezetko, What Happened to the Book of Samuel in the Persian Period and Beyond? (page 249)
    • 1. Introduction (page 249)
    • 2. Sparse Evidence and Scholarly Hypothesis on Language Development (page 250)
    • 3. Linguistic Dating in Text-critical and Literary-critical Contexts (page 251)
    • 4. Early Biblical Hebrew and Late Biblical Hebrew Each as a Cohesive Linguistic Entity (page 253)
    • 5. Conclusion (page 263)
  • Ian Young, What is Late Biblical Hebrew? (page 265)
    • 1. Competing Models: Chronological and Stylistic (page 265)
    • 2. What is Late Biblical Hebrew? (page 274)
  • Ehud Ben Zvi, The Communicative Message of Some Linguistic Choices (page 281)
  • Author Index (page 303)
  • References Index (page 311)
Customers who bought this item also bought

Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures I

Comprising the contents of Journal of Hebrew Scriptures, volumes 1–4
ISBN: 978-1-59333-310-2
This volume incorporates all the articles and reviews published in Volumes 1-4 (1996-2003) of the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures.
$222.60

Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures II

Comprising the contents of Journal of Hebrew Scriptures, vol. 5
ISBN: 978-1-59333-612-7
This volume incorporates all the articles and reviews published in Volume 5 (2004-2005) of the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures.
$187.60

Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures III

Comprising the Contents of Journal of Hebrew Scriptures, Vol. 6
ISBN: 978-1-59333-976-0
This volume incorporates all the articles and reviews published in Volume 6 (2006) of the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures.
$158.90

Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures IV

Comprising the Contents of Journal of Hebrew Scriptures, Vol. 7
Edited by Ehud Ben Zvi
ISBN: 978-1-59333-920-3
This volume incorporates all the articles and reviews published in Volume 7 (2007) of the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures.
$169.40