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A Residence of Eight Years in Persia among the Nestorian Christians with Notices of the Muhammedans


Gives a travelogue and a journal of his missionary activities in the Middle East between 1834 and 1841, primarily with the Church of the East.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 1-59333-410-9
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 19,2006
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 592
ISBN: 1-59333-410-9
$228.00
$136.80

In A Residence of Eight Years in Persia among the Nestorian Christians, Justin Perkins gives a travelogue and a journal of his missionary activities in the Middle East between 1834 and 1841, primarily with the Church of the East. After a brief introduction to the history of the "Nestorian" Christians and an outline of the origin and beginnings of the American mission in the Middle East, Perkins narrates his travels in the region, giving insights to current events, both political and ecclesiastical. Subsequent chapters are devoted to his journal diary from 1836 to 1841. Perkins concludes his book with the story of his return to America. This book is essential to the study of American missionary activities in the Middle East during the nineteenth century.

Justin Perkins (1805-1869) graduated from Amherst in 1829. He spent two years at Andover Theological Seminary, was a tutor for nearly a year in Amherst, and in 1833 was sent to begin a mission to the Church of the East in Urmia, Persia. Almost unaided, he laid the foundation of the mission. He was instrumental in turning the spoken Neo-Aramaic dialect into a literary language, and helped in translating the whole Bible into Neo-Aramaic. He also translated other books, prepared and published a commentary on Genesis and Daniel, aided in general missionary work, and in established and directed various mission-schools. His connection with the mission, of which he was the chief support, lasted about thirty-six years. In addition to this book, he also published Missionary Life in Persia (1861).

In A Residence of Eight Years in Persia among the Nestorian Christians, Justin Perkins gives a travelogue and a journal of his missionary activities in the Middle East between 1834 and 1841, primarily with the Church of the East. After a brief introduction to the history of the "Nestorian" Christians and an outline of the origin and beginnings of the American mission in the Middle East, Perkins narrates his travels in the region, giving insights to current events, both political and ecclesiastical. Subsequent chapters are devoted to his journal diary from 1836 to 1841. Perkins concludes his book with the story of his return to America. This book is essential to the study of American missionary activities in the Middle East during the nineteenth century.

Justin Perkins (1805-1869) graduated from Amherst in 1829. He spent two years at Andover Theological Seminary, was a tutor for nearly a year in Amherst, and in 1833 was sent to begin a mission to the Church of the East in Urmia, Persia. Almost unaided, he laid the foundation of the mission. He was instrumental in turning the spoken Neo-Aramaic dialect into a literary language, and helped in translating the whole Bible into Neo-Aramaic. He also translated other books, prepared and published a commentary on Genesis and Daniel, aided in general missionary work, and in established and directed various mission-schools. His connection with the mission, of which he was the chief support, lasted about thirty-six years. In addition to this book, he also published Missionary Life in Persia (1861).

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Contributor Biography

Justin Perkins

Justin Perkins (d.1869) was an American Presbyterian missionary and linguist. In September, 1833, he set sail for Persia as a missionary for the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and he went on to establish a missionary center and a printing press in Urmia that would continue for 35 years. He was widely recognized as a scholar of the Syriac language, and he published widely in the modern Syriac vernacular, including a translation of the New Testament (1846), the Old Testament (1852), and a referenced version of the Old Testament (1858). The first two of these contained the text in ancient and modern Syriac in parallel columns. His other works included books for regular and Sunday schools, hymnbooks, and translation of religious works.