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A Short Chronicle on the End of the Sasanian Empire and Early Islam


590-660 A.D.


Edited and Translated by Nasir al-Ka'bi
The Short Chronicle is an eyewitness report on the demise of the Sasanian and Byzantines Empires and the beginning of the Islamic period. It uses official Sasanian sources and Syriac church documents and mentions for the first time new Arab cities, including Mosul, Kufa, and Baṣra.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0563-8
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Sep 6,2016
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 254
Languages: English, Syriac
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0563-8
$161.20
$96.72

The Short Chronicle is probably part of a Church History that is no longer extant, and it was written by an Ecclesiastic living in the north of Mesopotamia and belonging to the Church of the East. It is an eyewitness report on a crucial historical period, the mid-7th century that witnessed the demise of two contending world empires, the Sasanian and the Byzantine, and their replacement by Islam, thus signaling the end of Late Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. The Chronicle may be the earliest Syriac document which relies heavily on official Sasanian sources, including Khwadāy-nāmag, when it discusses secular history, and on church histories when dealing with ecclesiastical matters. It may also be the oldest Syriac chronicle which deals with the advent of Muḥammad and the ensuing Arab conquest, and which mentions Arab cities for the first time ever, including Mosul, Kufa, and Baṣra.

 

NASIR al-KAʿBI: Post-Doctoral Fellow at the university of Toronto (2014-2016) and Assistant Professor of history at the Department of History, University of Kufa, Iraq. Among his publications: Sasanian State in Arabic Sources: A Study of Political History (Damascus 2008; in Arabic); The Debate between State and Religion in the Sasanian Era (Beirut 2010; in Arabic).

The Short Chronicle is probably part of a Church History that is no longer extant, and it was written by an Ecclesiastic living in the north of Mesopotamia and belonging to the Church of the East. It is an eyewitness report on a crucial historical period, the mid-7th century that witnessed the demise of two contending world empires, the Sasanian and the Byzantine, and their replacement by Islam, thus signaling the end of Late Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. The Chronicle may be the earliest Syriac document which relies heavily on official Sasanian sources, including Khwadāy-nāmag, when it discusses secular history, and on church histories when dealing with ecclesiastical matters. It may also be the oldest Syriac chronicle which deals with the advent of Muḥammad and the ensuing Arab conquest, and which mentions Arab cities for the first time ever, including Mosul, Kufa, and Baṣra.

 

NASIR al-KAʿBI: Post-Doctoral Fellow at the university of Toronto (2014-2016) and Assistant Professor of history at the Department of History, University of Kufa, Iraq. Among his publications: Sasanian State in Arabic Sources: A Study of Political History (Damascus 2008; in Arabic); The Debate between State and Religion in the Sasanian Era (Beirut 2010; in Arabic).

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Contributor Biography

Nasir al-Ka'bi

Nasir al-Assistant professor University of Kufa, Iraq. Post–doctoral fellow at the University of Toronto, Ph.D.(2008) University of Tehran and University of Kufa (Iraq), publications include: Sasanian State in Arabic sources: A Study of the Political History(in Arabic) (Damascus: 2008); The Debate between State and Religion in the Sasanian Period (in Arabic) (Beirut: 2010).

  • Table of Contents (page 7)
  • Abbreviations (page 9)
  • Preface and acknowledgements (page 11)
  • Introduction (page 13)
    • The Manuscript and the Identity of its Author (page 13)
    • Sources and Contents of the Chronicle (page 21)
    • Historiographical Approach (page 81)
  • Text and Translation (page 93)
  • Chronology of the Short Chronicle (page 209)
  • Bibliography (page 215)
  • Individuals mentioned in the Chronicle (page 235)
  • List of works relating to the Chronicle (page 237)
  • Maps and Tables (page 239)
  • Indexes (page 241)
    • Index of Personal Names (page 241)
    • Index of Place Names (page 245)
    • Index of Biblical and Qur'anic citations (page 248)
    • Subject Index (page 249)
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