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Abendländischer Einfluss in armenischer Buchmalerei des 10. Jahrhunderts?


In the present essay, Anton Baumstark responds to E. Weigand’s argument for a Western influence on the artwork found in tenth century illustrated Armenian manuscripts by demonstrating that the artistic influences could have come from the Eastern tradition as well.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-979-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 500
Publication Date: Mar 23,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 32
Language: German
ISBN: 978-1-60724-979-5
$24.80
$14.88

In a previous publication, E. Weigand argued for at least two cases in which the artwork found in a tenth century Armenian manuscript of the Bible was influenced by the Western illumination tradition. The two illustrations in question are: the symbols used for the Gospel writers and the position of Peter and Paul at the side of Mary in an ascension scene. In the present essay, Anton Baumstark responds to Weigand’s argument that these illustrations were influenced by the Western tradition by attempting to show that these elements were part of the eastern traditions as well—most notably the Byzantine and Syriac traditions. Baumstark does not argue that the Western tradition did not play an influential role as well, he simply argues, contra Weigand, that these artistic elements could have come from the Eastern tradition as well. Thus, Baumstark’s argument serves as a corrective for an exclusively Western influence on the artwork found in the tenth century illustrated Armenian manuscripts.

In a previous publication, E. Weigand argued for at least two cases in which the artwork found in a tenth century Armenian manuscript of the Bible was influenced by the Western illumination tradition. The two illustrations in question are: the symbols used for the Gospel writers and the position of Peter and Paul at the side of Mary in an ascension scene. In the present essay, Anton Baumstark responds to Weigand’s argument that these illustrations were influenced by the Western tradition by attempting to show that these elements were part of the eastern traditions as well—most notably the Byzantine and Syriac traditions. Baumstark does not argue that the Western tradition did not play an influential role as well, he simply argues, contra Weigand, that these artistic elements could have come from the Eastern tradition as well. Thus, Baumstark’s argument serves as a corrective for an exclusively Western influence on the artwork found in the tenth century illustrated Armenian manuscripts.

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Anton Baumstark

  • Abendländischer Einfluss in Armenischer Buchmalerie des 10. Jahrhunderts (page 5)