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Against “Irenaean” Theodicy


A Refutation of John Hick's Use of Irenaeus


This book serves to correct the now accepted understanding of Irenaeus’s theodicy. This assumption of Hick’s theodicy as legitimately “Irenaean” remains due the gulf between Irenaean scholarship and discussion of the problem of evil. The present work offers a bridge between the two to allow for the continued discussion of both theologian’s distinct views.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-4071-4
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 25,2019
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 213
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-4071-4
$146.00
$116.80

Entrenched in scholarship on the problem of evil, John Hick’s Irenaean theodicy seemingly stands as a contemporary solution linked to the past. Against “Irenaean” Theodicy examines Hick’s connection of his work to the second-century bishop of Lyon. Hionides proposes that the connection ought to be severed. Considering the context and works of both theologians on the problem of evil, Hionides establishes that Irenaeus’s solution contrasts with Hick’s. Freeing the second-century bishop from Hick’s theodicy allows the two theologians’ distinct resolutions of the problem of evil to stand on their own.

Entrenched in scholarship on the problem of evil, John Hick’s Irenaean theodicy seemingly stands as a contemporary solution linked to the past. Against “Irenaean” Theodicy examines Hick’s connection of his work to the second-century bishop of Lyon. Hionides proposes that the connection ought to be severed. Considering the context and works of both theologians on the problem of evil, Hionides establishes that Irenaeus’s solution contrasts with Hick’s. Freeing the second-century bishop from Hick’s theodicy allows the two theologians’ distinct resolutions of the problem of evil to stand on their own.

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Contributor Biography

David Hionides

David Hionides holds a PhD in Theological Studies from Dallas Theological Seminary. He is currently the Director of Institutional Research and Effectiveness at DTS and has taught at Seminario Telologico Hebron and Criswell College.

Table of Contents (v)
Acknowledgments (vii)
Abbreviations (ix)
Preface (xiii)
Introduction (1)
Chapter One. Hick’s Use of Irenaeus (23)
   Introduction (23)
   Hick (24)
   “Augustinian” Theodicy (34)
   “Irenaean” Theodicy (37)
   Hick’s Irenaeus (37)
   Hick’s “Irenaean” Theodicy (40)
   Creation and Progression (41)
   Death (43)
   Universalism (45)
   Conclusion (46)
Chapter Two. Background and Sources for Irenaeus on the Problem of Evil (49)
   Introduction (49)
   The Problem of Evil in Pagan Thought (50)
   The Problem of Evil in Early Christian Thought (54)
   Before Irenaeus (55)
   After Irenaeus (66)
   Conclusion (77)
Chapter Three. Irenaeus and Theodicy (79)
   Introduction (79)
   Irenaeus (80)
   Irenaeus as Interpreter of Scripture (85)
   Diversity within Unity (90)
   Non-Speculative beyond Scripture (98)
   The Thought of Irenaeus’s Opponents on the Problem of Evil (99)
   Valentinians (104)
   Gnostics (106)
   Marcion (108)
   Other Opponents (109)
   Conclusion (109)
   Irenaeus on the Problem of Evil (109)
   Irenaeus on Creation (110)
   Irenaeus on Humanity’s Progression in the One Plan or Economy of God (114)
   Irenaeus on The Origin of Evil (116)
   Irenaeus on Human Transgression (119)
   Irenaeus on Death (121)
   Irenaeus’s Free-Will Defense (123)
   Conclusion (125)
Chapter Four. The Divergence of Hick’s Interpretation (127)
   Introduction (127)
   Three Key Differences in Hick’s Reading (127)
   Creation as Including Divinely Created Evil (128)
   An Excusable Disobedience, Not a Devastating Tragedy (132)
   Two Stages with One Method of Humanity’s Progression (135)
   Hick’s False Dichotomy (139)
   Conclusion (145)
Chapter Five. Conclusion (147)
Bibliography (157)
Index (193)

 

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