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An Apology for Conforming to the Protestant Episcopal Church

Contained in a series of Letters addressed to the Reverend Benjamin T. Onderdonk, D.D., Bishop of the Diocese of New York. By Thomas S. Brittan.


The article reviews a text by a convert from Presbyterianism to the Protestant Episcopal Church. The reviewer is critical of much of the evidence the author uses and declares the book to be poor in quality and unoriginal.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-186-5
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Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 808
Publication Date: Aug 5,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 30
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-186-5
$36.00

Under review is a text by a convert from Presbyterianism to the Protestant Episcopal Church. The book consists of nine letters. The reviewer remarks that the book’s author confuses Independency and Presbyterianism, and he effaces controversy in Episcopal government. Indeed, the reviewer claims that the Protestant Episcopal Church is engaged in the same strife as the Presbyterian Church. The reviewer questions the Episcopal Church’s claims of infallibility. In regards to the letter on “Episcopacy sanctioned by the Institutions of Judaism,” these is nothing new in the account. The review questions the scriptural basis for Episcopalian ministry’s basis in Levitical priesthood. The reviewer sees many sources in the fourth letter “disingenuously quoted.” Little evidence supports the legitimacy of prelacy. Much attention is paid to the author’s claim that Luther was a Presbyterian in sentiment, towards which the reviewer expresses suspicion. The reviewer questions the author’s choice of evidence that Episcopacy is “sustained by the testimony of the Fathers.” He likewise questions the author’s skepticism over the verity of some of Ignatius’ epistles. The review concludes the book is “uninformed” and “superficial.”

Under review is a text by a convert from Presbyterianism to the Protestant Episcopal Church. The book consists of nine letters. The reviewer remarks that the book’s author confuses Independency and Presbyterianism, and he effaces controversy in Episcopal government. Indeed, the reviewer claims that the Protestant Episcopal Church is engaged in the same strife as the Presbyterian Church. The reviewer questions the Episcopal Church’s claims of infallibility. In regards to the letter on “Episcopacy sanctioned by the Institutions of Judaism,” these is nothing new in the account. The review questions the scriptural basis for Episcopalian ministry’s basis in Levitical priesthood. The reviewer sees many sources in the fourth letter “disingenuously quoted.” Little evidence supports the legitimacy of prelacy. Much attention is paid to the author’s claim that Luther was a Presbyterian in sentiment, towards which the reviewer expresses suspicion. The reviewer questions the author’s choice of evidence that Episcopacy is “sustained by the testimony of the Fathers.” He likewise questions the author’s skepticism over the verity of some of Ignatius’ epistles. The review concludes the book is “uninformed” and “superficial.”

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