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Andreas Juckel

Andreas Juckel is a Research Associate at the Oriental Department of the Institute for New Testament Textual Research, University of Muenster/Germany. His doctoral dissertation (1983, University of Bonn) provided an initial edition of Ktaba d-Durrasha (didactic poetry) of the East-Syriac writer Elija of Anbar. He is co-editor of the comparative edition Das Neue Testament in syrischer Überlieferung (cath. Epp. 1986, Pauline Epp. 1995-2002) and has published on textual criticism of the Syriac NT and on Syriac Lexicography. Inetje E. Parlevliet-Flesseman is a privat scholar who lives in Almelo/NL. She studied theology at the Groninger Universiteit and the Vrije Universiteit/Amsterdam and wrote a thesis entitled De Tekst van de Pesjitta in de Brief aan de Galaten (1993). Since 1992 she is associated with the Peshitta research of the Institute for New Testament Textual Research/Muenster.

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Foundations for Syriac Lexicography II

Colloquia of the International Syriac Language Project
Edited by P. J. Williams; Managing Editor Beryl Turner
ISBN: 978-1-60724-088-4
This volume is part of a series that addresses issues of Classical Syriac lexicography, and the lexicography of other ancient languages. The international team of authors invited to participate represents a wide range of disciplines and opens new horizons in lexical thinking. Essays in this volume discuss taxonomy, the Syriac passive participle, translating Greek verbs with alpha privatives into Syriac, the translation of Syriac particles, and the history of Syriac lexica. This book represents the forefront of Syriac lexical studies, and has much to offer those studying Greek and other Semitic languages as well.

Approximation of the ‘traditions’ in Jacob of Edessa’s Revision of Isaiah

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 124
ISBN: 978-1-60724-036-5
This article contributes to the knowledge of Jacob of Edessa’s (d. 708) Old Testament revision by editing twenty texts (a total of 80 verses) from the Book of Isaiah and comparing them with the Greek recensions of the Septuagint, with the Peshitta, and the Syrohexapla. Two special features are introduced to set out Jacob’s revision technique in some detail: 1. comparison with an earlier undeveloped stage of Jacob’s revision extant in Ms Add 17,134 of the British Library; and 2. the distinction (by different colours and fonts) of the ‘traditions’ involved in the definite stage of his revision. Both features point to the emphasis given to the Peshitta in translating the substantial Greek text of the Old Testament.