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The Text of the New Testament in Early Translations and Quotations


Indirect evidence, in the form of early translations (‘versions’) and biblical quotations in ancient writers (‘patristic citations’), offers important testimony to the history and transmission of the New Testament. In addition to their value as early evidence for the Greek New Testament, versions have a textual tradition of their own which is often of considerable historical, theological and ecclesial significance. This volume brings together a series of original contributions on this topic, which was the focus of the Eleventh Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament. The research described here illustrates not just the ongoing importance and variety of this material, but also the way in which it may shape the theory and practice of text-critical scholarship and lead to new insights about this vast and rich tradition.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-4109-4
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Dec 31,2020
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 361
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-4109-4
$158.00
Your price: $126.40

Indirect evidence, in the form of early translations (‘versions’) and biblical quotations in ancient writers (‘patristic citations’), offers important testimony to the history and transmission of the New Testament. In addition to their value as early evidence for the Greek New Testament, versions have a textual tradition of their own which is often of considerable historical, theological and ecclesial significance. Early quotations have the potential to provide a form of text which can be attributed to a specific time and location, as well as shedding light on its interpretation. This volume brings together a series of original contributions on these topics, which were the focus of the Eleventh Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament. It includes an account of the newly-discovered third Old Syriac version of the Gospels, followed by studies of the Coptic, Arabic, Latin and Gothic traditions. Two Greek-Latin bilingual manuscripts are examined, Codex Bezae and the St Gall Bilingual Gospels, along with a comparison of verb forms in these languages. Biblical quotations are considered from Tertullian, Ambrose and John Chrysostom, as well as a work attributed to Rufinus the Syrian which has been key to identifying the origin of the Latin Vulgate: the early printed editions of this version are the subject of another chapter. Although at one remove from Greek New Testament manuscripts, the research described in this volume illustrates not just the ongoing importance and variety of indirect material, but also the way in which it may shape the theory and practice of text-critical scholarship and lead to new insights about this vast and rich tradition.

Indirect evidence, in the form of early translations (‘versions’) and biblical quotations in ancient writers (‘patristic citations’), offers important testimony to the history and transmission of the New Testament. In addition to their value as early evidence for the Greek New Testament, versions have a textual tradition of their own which is often of considerable historical, theological and ecclesial significance. Early quotations have the potential to provide a form of text which can be attributed to a specific time and location, as well as shedding light on its interpretation. This volume brings together a series of original contributions on these topics, which were the focus of the Eleventh Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament. It includes an account of the newly-discovered third Old Syriac version of the Gospels, followed by studies of the Coptic, Arabic, Latin and Gothic traditions. Two Greek-Latin bilingual manuscripts are examined, Codex Bezae and the St Gall Bilingual Gospels, along with a comparison of verb forms in these languages. Biblical quotations are considered from Tertullian, Ambrose and John Chrysostom, as well as a work attributed to Rufinus the Syrian which has been key to identifying the origin of the Latin Vulgate: the early printed editions of this version are the subject of another chapter. Although at one remove from Greek New Testament manuscripts, the research described in this volume illustrates not just the ongoing importance and variety of indirect material, but also the way in which it may shape the theory and practice of text-critical scholarship and lead to new insights about this vast and rich tradition.

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ContributorBiography

Peter Montoro

Peter Montoro is a doctoral candidate at ITSEE in the University of
Birmingham, working on the textual transmission of Chrysostom’s
Homilies on Romans. He has provided research assistance on a number
of projects, including the Tyndale House Greek New Testament,
jointly published by Crossway and Cambridge University Press
(2017). He serves as the preaching pastor of Westside Baptist Church
in Bremerton, Washington.

H. A. G. Houghton

H.A.G. Houghton is Professor of New Testament Textual Scholarship and Director of the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing at the University of Birmingham. He is currently principal investigator of the CATENA project and co-investigator of the Codex Zacynthius project, as well as serving as executive editor of the Pauline Epistles for the International Greek New Testament Project.

List of Contributors. vii

Abbreviations. xi

Introduction.. xv

1. New Developments in the Textual Study of the Old Syriac Gospels
David G. K. Taylor.. 1

2. The Old Syriac Gospels as a Witness to Tatian’s Diatessaron ? The Text-Critical Use of a Rival Tradition
Ian N. Mills. 43

3. The Sahidic Version of the Gospel of John: Translating an Understandable Text into Coptic
Hans Förster.. 65

4. The Textual Character of Codex Sinaiticus Arabicus and its Family
Robert Turnbull. 87

5. The Gothic Version within the New Testament Tradition
Carla Falluomini107

6. Latin Codex 563 of the Austrian National Library and its Biblical Texts
Anne-Catherine Baudoin.. 125

7. The Latin Text of John in the Saint Gall Bilingual Gospels (Codex Sangallensis 48)
H. A. G. Houghton.. 149

8. An Examination of Six Objections to the Theory of Latin Influence on the Greek Text of Codex Bezae
Peter E. Lorenz. 173

9. To Be or Not To Be: Presence and Absence of Copulative Verbs in Greek and Latin New Testament Manuscripts
W. Andrew Smith.. 189

10. On the Earliest Printed Editions of the Vulgate with a Text-Critical Apparatus
Teunis van Lopik.. 211

11. The Textual Stability of Patristic Citations: Romans 8:33–35 in John Chrysostom’s Homilies on Romans as a Test Case
Peter Montoro.. 239

12. The Text of the Pericope Adulterae in Early Latin Writers
Tommy Wasserman.. 263

13. The Affiliation of the Quotations from the New Testament Epistles in the Liber de Fide
Anna Persig.. 287

14. Did Tertullian Know a Twenty-Chapter Gospel of John?
Benjamin D. Haupt.. 311

Indices. 323

Index of Biblical Passages323

Index of Manuscripts. 326

Index of Subjects. 333

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