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"Behold! My Servant"


An Exegetical and Theological Study of the Identity and Role of the Servant in Isaiah 42:1-9


Scholars have long debated the identity of the servant in the first servant poem of Isaiah. This present volume provides a fresh reinvestigation of the identity of the servant in Isaiah 42:1-9 and its role among the other servant poems, also examining other relevant “servant” passages in Isaiah—particularly in Second Isaiah. The result reveals a thorough linguistic, intratextual, and thematic framework for interpreting the identity and role of this servant.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0559-1
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 2,2015
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 393
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0559-1
$208.00

Scholars have long debated the identity of the servant in the first servant poem of Isaiah. In “Behold! My Servant”: An Exegetical and Theological Study of the Identity and Role of the Servant in Isaiah 42:1-9, Stéphane A. Beaulieu provides a fresh reinvestigation of the identity of the servant in Isaiah 42:1-9 and its role among the other servant poems.

Beaulieu’s critical evaluation includes an examination of other relevant “servant” passages in Isaiah—particularly in Second Isaiah. Detailed comparisons reveal recurring commonalities and differences among these passages. The result is a thorough linguistic, intratextual, and thematic framework for interpreting the identity and role of this servant.

Stéphane A. Beaulieu is assistant professor of Old Testament at Pacific Union College. He holds a Ph.D. in Old Testament exegesis from Andrews University. His articles have appeared in Perspectives in Religious Studies and other journals.

Scholars have long debated the identity of the servant in the first servant poem of Isaiah. In “Behold! My Servant”: An Exegetical and Theological Study of the Identity and Role of the Servant in Isaiah 42:1-9, Stéphane A. Beaulieu provides a fresh reinvestigation of the identity of the servant in Isaiah 42:1-9 and its role among the other servant poems.

Beaulieu’s critical evaluation includes an examination of other relevant “servant” passages in Isaiah—particularly in Second Isaiah. Detailed comparisons reveal recurring commonalities and differences among these passages. The result is a thorough linguistic, intratextual, and thematic framework for interpreting the identity and role of this servant.

Stéphane A. Beaulieu is assistant professor of Old Testament at Pacific Union College. He holds a Ph.D. in Old Testament exegesis from Andrews University. His articles have appeared in Perspectives in Religious Studies and other journals.

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Contributor Biography

Stéphane Beaulieu

Stéphane A. Beaulieu is assistant professor of Old Testament at Pacific Union College. He holds a Ph.D. in Old Testament exegesis from Andrews University. His articles have appeared in Perspectives in Religious Studies and other journals.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • List of Tables (page 9)
  • List of Abbreviations (page 11)
  • Acknowledgments (page 17)
  • Chapter 1. Introduction (page 19)
    • Background to the Problem (page 19)
    • Statement of the Problem (page 28)
    • Purpose of the Study (page 29)
    • History of Interpretation of the Servant of the Lord in Isaiah (page 29)
    • Justification for the Study (page 54)
    • Delimitations (page 54)
    • Methodology (page 54)
    • The Nature of Biblical Typology within Classical Prophecy (page 56)
  • Chapter 2. An Exegetical Investigation of Isaiah 42:1-9 (page 63)
    • Introduction (page 63)
    • The Servant in Isaiah 40-55 (page 63)
    • The Servant of Isaiah 42:1-9 (page 79)
    • Summary (page 90)
    • The Servant in Isaiah 42:1-4 (page 91)
    • Summary (page 132)
    • The Servant in Isaiah 42:5-9 (page 133)
    • Summary (page 179)
    • Conclusion (page 180)
  • Chapter 3. Intratextual Relationships With Other Servant References (page 181)
    • Introduction (page 181)
    • Comparison of First Servant Poem to Second Servant Poem - Isaiah 49:1-12 (page 182)
    • Comparison of First Servant Poem to Third Servant Poem - Isaiah 50:4-11 (page 194)
    • Comparison of First Servant Poem to Fourth Servant Poem - Isaiah 52:13-53:12 (page 203)
    • Comparison of First Servant Poem to Other Isaianic 'Servant' Passages (page 220)
    • Comparing the Servant of Isaiah 42:1-9 with the Servant of Isaiah 41:8-9 (page 220)
    • Comparing the Servant of Isaiah 42:1-9 with the Servant of Isaiah 42:16-25 (page 224)
    • Comparing the Servant of Isaiah 42:1-9 with the Servant of Isaiah 45:1-8 (page 227)
    • Individual Servant of Isaiah 42:1-9 vs. Corporate Servant of Isaiah 43:10 (page 233)
    • Individual Servant of Isaiah 42:1-9 vs. Corporate Servant of Isaiah 44:1,2 (page 238)
    • Individual Servant of Isaiah 42:1-9 vs. Corporate Servant of Isaiah 44:21 (page 239)
    • Individual Servant of Isaiah 42:1-9 vs. Corporate Servant of Isaiah 44:26 (page 240)
    • Individual Servant of Isaiah 42:1-9 vs. Corporate Servant of Isaiah 48:20 (page 241)
    • Individual Servant of Isaiah 42:1-9 vs. Plural Servants of Isaiah 54:17 (page 241)
    • Intratextual Links Between Isaiah 42:1-9 and Other Messianic Hope Passages Outside of Isaiah 40-55 (page 242)
    • Conclusion (page 262)
  • Chapter 4. Theology of the First Servant Poem in its Canonical Context (page 265)
    • Introduction (page 265)
    • Theology of the First Servant Poem (page 265)
    • Development/Theology of the First Servant Poem in Light of the Other Isaianic Servant Poems (page 285)
    • Theology of the Servant in the Context of Isaiah 40-55 (page 303)
    • Who is the Servant of the First Servant Poem? (page 309)
    • Summary and Conclusion (page 317)
  • Chapter 5. Summary and Conclusion (page 321)
    • Summary (page 321)
    • Conclusion (page 325)
    • Application (page 327)
    • Implications for Further Study (page 327)
  • Bibliography (page 331)
  • Index (page 365)
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