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Cantus scriptus: Technologies of Medieval Song


The Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age; 2010 Symposium


Edited by Lynn Ransom & Emma Dillon
This volume gathers six essays from papers presented at the 3rd Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on November 19-20, 2010. The essays explore both the technology of inscribed musical expression in the Middle Ages—especially in regard to notation—and the role that modern digital technologies play in facilitating the study of music manuscripts today. As the manuscript evidence shows, medieval music as written text was both expressive and prescriptive in shaping music-making practices, performance, and reception.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-056-8
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Sep 20,2012
Interior Color: Black with Color Inserts
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 177
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-056-8
$127.00

This volume gathers six essays from papers presented at the 3rd Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium held at the University of Pennsylvania and the Free Library of Philadelphia in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 19-20, 2010. The symposium explored both the technology of inscribed musical expression in the Middle Ages—especially in regard to notation—and the role that modern digital technologies play in facilitating the study of music manuscripts today. As the manuscript evidence shows, medieval music as written text was both expressive and prescriptive in shaping music-making practices, performance, and reception. Digital technologies allow the modern observer to dig deeper into these unique artifacts of musical history. Essays by noted musicologists, including Susan Rankin, Anne Stone, Lauren Jennings, Michael Cuthbert, Julia Craig-McFeely, and Jane Alden, offer valuable insights into the history of medieval music gleaned from early notation practices, codicological evidence, and textual analysis as well as into the value and difficulties of using modern technologies.

This volume gathers six essays from papers presented at the 3rd Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium held at the University of Pennsylvania and the Free Library of Philadelphia in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 19-20, 2010. The symposium explored both the technology of inscribed musical expression in the Middle Ages—especially in regard to notation—and the role that modern digital technologies play in facilitating the study of music manuscripts today. As the manuscript evidence shows, medieval music as written text was both expressive and prescriptive in shaping music-making practices, performance, and reception. Digital technologies allow the modern observer to dig deeper into these unique artifacts of musical history. Essays by noted musicologists, including Susan Rankin, Anne Stone, Lauren Jennings, Michael Cuthbert, Julia Craig-McFeely, and Jane Alden, offer valuable insights into the history of medieval music gleaned from early notation practices, codicological evidence, and textual analysis as well as into the value and difficulties of using modern technologies.

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Contributor Biography

Lynn Ransom

Lynn Ransom is the Project Manager for the Schoenberg Database of Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania. She holds a Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Texas. She has published in the field of medieval Art History and in Manuscript Studies.

Emma Dillon

Susan Rankin

Anne Stone

Lauren Jennings

Michael Scott Cuthbert

Julia Craig-McFeely

Jane Alden

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Preface (page 7)
  • Introduction (page 9)
  • Capturing Sounds:The Notation of Language by Susan Rankin (page 19)
  • Music Notation, Metaphor, and The Reification of Late-Medieval Song by Anne Stone (page 51)
  • Technologies of Un-Notated Transmission: Trecento Song as Literature in One Early Sixteenth- Century Poetic Anthology by Lauren Jennings (page 85)
  • Monks, Manuscripts, and Other Peer-to-Peer Song Sharing Networks of the Middle Ages by Michael Scott Cuthbert (page 109)
  • From Perfect to Preposterous: How Digital Restoration Can Both Help and Hinder Our Reading of Damaged Sources by Julia Craig-McFeely (page 133)
  • Quill and Pixel: Chansonniers and their Modern Readers by Jane Alden (page 151)
  • Contributors (page 171)
  • Index (page 173)
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