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Certain Parallel Developments in Pali and New Persian Phonology


Pali and New Persian are without influence on one another, yet they show a striking similarity in their development. All coincidences between the two languages are due to the operation of the laws of development which govern the Indo-Iranian languages.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-012-7
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Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 718
Publication Date: Aug 7,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 19
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-012-7
$22.85
$13.71

It is a well-known fact in linguistics that languages which are entirely without influence on one another often show a striking similarity in their development. The Indo-Iranian group is especially informative in this regard. Between the Indian and the Iranian divisions of the Aryan dialects a development may be traced which is frequently closely parallel. The change between the Sanskrit and the Pali-Prakrit in the Indian branch, as compared with the transition grade of the Pahlavi in Iranian, is due in great part to the long preservation of the Sanskrit as a learned language. The close attention to the preservation of the written language which is so marked in India never existed in Iran. It is found in Persia the successive changes in language recorded in the literature, while in India the Pali-Prakrit appear at once as finished languages. All coincidences between the Pali and the New Persian are due solely to the operation in both dialects of the laws of development which govern the Indo-Iranian languages in general.

It is a well-known fact in linguistics that languages which are entirely without influence on one another often show a striking similarity in their development. The Indo-Iranian group is especially informative in this regard. Between the Indian and the Iranian divisions of the Aryan dialects a development may be traced which is frequently closely parallel. The change between the Sanskrit and the Pali-Prakrit in the Indian branch, as compared with the transition grade of the Pahlavi in Iranian, is due in great part to the long preservation of the Sanskrit as a learned language. The close attention to the preservation of the written language which is so marked in India never existed in Iran. It is found in Persia the successive changes in language recorded in the literature, while in India the Pali-Prakrit appear at once as finished languages. All coincidences between the Pali and the New Persian are due solely to the operation in both dialects of the laws of development which govern the Indo-Iranian languages in general.

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Contributor

Louis Gray

  • Certain Parallel Developments in Pali and New Persian Phonology (page 5)