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Changing the Center of Gravity


Transforming Classical Studies Through Cyberinfrastructure


The essays in this volume reflect a new generation of classicists hunting for new methods to understand and to disseminate ancient texts, both to increase the body of published information about classical Greek and Latin and also to encourage these languages to play an increased role in the intellectual life of humanity. In discussing areas as diverse as teaching, citation, criticism, collaboration, epigraphy, geography, grammar, lexicography, and digitization, this volume demonstrates the new scope and potential in Digital Classics research.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-881-1
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Mar 23,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 485
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-881-1
$175.00
$105.00

This collection of essays represents the wide perspective of current research being undertaken in Digital Classics. Classics has always been at the forefront of the use of computing in Humanities research. We are now beginning to see new intellectual practices and a new cyberinfrastructure emerging which go beyond relatively superficial technological methods which evolved alongside print technologies. These innovative research environments allow Classical scholars to access, create, manipulate, interrogate, analyse, and utilise disparate digital sources in their complex research tasks.

The essays in this volume reflect a new generation of classicists hunting for new methods to understand and to disseminate ancient texts, both to increase the body of published information about classical Greek and Latin and also to encourage these languages to play an increased role in the intellectual life of humanity. In discussing areas as diverse as teaching, citation, criticism, collaboration, epigraphy, geography, grammar, lexicography, and digitization, this volume demonstrates the new scope and potential in Digital Classics research.

These essays emerged from a workshop on October 5th 2007 on the subject of Cyberinfrastructure in the Classics, funded by the National Science Foundation and hosted by the University of Kentucky. They serve as a festschrift to Allen Ross Scaife, Professor of Classics at the University of Kentucky and founding editor of the Stoa Consortium for Electronic Publication in the Humanities (stoa.org), who did more than any one person to advance the field of classics in the decade that carried us from the twentieth to the twenty-first century.

This collection of essays represents the wide perspective of current research being undertaken in Digital Classics. Classics has always been at the forefront of the use of computing in Humanities research. We are now beginning to see new intellectual practices and a new cyberinfrastructure emerging which go beyond relatively superficial technological methods which evolved alongside print technologies. These innovative research environments allow Classical scholars to access, create, manipulate, interrogate, analyse, and utilise disparate digital sources in their complex research tasks.

The essays in this volume reflect a new generation of classicists hunting for new methods to understand and to disseminate ancient texts, both to increase the body of published information about classical Greek and Latin and also to encourage these languages to play an increased role in the intellectual life of humanity. In discussing areas as diverse as teaching, citation, criticism, collaboration, epigraphy, geography, grammar, lexicography, and digitization, this volume demonstrates the new scope and potential in Digital Classics research.

These essays emerged from a workshop on October 5th 2007 on the subject of Cyberinfrastructure in the Classics, funded by the National Science Foundation and hosted by the University of Kentucky. They serve as a festschrift to Allen Ross Scaife, Professor of Classics at the University of Kentucky and founding editor of the Stoa Consortium for Electronic Publication in the Humanities (stoa.org), who did more than any one person to advance the field of classics in the decade that carried us from the twentieth to the twenty-first century.

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Contributor Biography

Melissa Terras

Melissa Terras is the Senior Lecturer in Electronic Communication in the Department of Information Studies, University College London. With a background in Classical Art History and English Literature, and Computing Science, her doctorate (University of Oxford) examined how to use advanced information engineering technologies to interpret and read the Vindolanda texts. Publications include Image to Interpretation: Intelligent Systems to Aid Historians in the Reading of the Vindolanda Texts (2006, Oxford Studies in Ancient Documents. Oxford University Press) and Digital Images for the Information Professional (2008, Ashgate). She is a general editor of DHQ, the Vice president of the Association for Computers and the Humanities, and Secretary of the Association of Literary and Linguistic Computing. Her research focuses on the use of computational techniques to enable research in the arts and humanities that would otherwise be impossible.

Gregory Crane

Gregory Crane, Professor of Classics and Winnick Family Chair of Technology and Entrepreneurship at Tufts University, is the editor in chief of the Perseus Project. He has a broad interest in and has published extensively on the interaction between intellectual practice and technological infrastructure in the humanities.

  • Table of Contents (page 7)
  • Foreword (page 13)
  • Preface (page 15)
  • Acknowledgements (page 17)
  • Ross Scaife (1960-2008) (page 21)
  • Cyberinfrastructure for Classical Philology (page 25)
    • Abstract (page 25)
    • Terms and Continuities (page 29)
    • Wissenschaft and Philology (page 29)
    • Classics and the Humanities (page 31)
    • Infrastructure (page 34)
    • Classics in 2008 (page 36)
    • Digital Incunabula: The Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (1972) (page 44)
    • Machine-actionable Knowledge Bases: Theperseus Digital Library (1987) (page 48)
    • Digital Communities: Stoa Publishing Consortium (1997) (page 51)
    • Cyberinfrastructure (page 53)
    • Producing New Knowledge: e-Philology (page 54)
    • Extending the Intellectual Reach of Humanity: e-Classics & e-Humanities (page 63)
    • Bibliography (page 70)
  • Technology, Collaboration, and Undergraduate Research (page 81)
    • Abstract (page 81)
    • Introduction (page 81)
    • An Audience of More Than Oneƒ (page 85)
    • When All the Sources Are Online (page 90)
    • From Each Accordingƒ (page 97)
    • Shaking the Foundations (page 100)
    • Conclusion (page 108)
    • Bibliography (page 109)
  • Tachypaedia Byzantina: the Suda Online as Collaborative Encyclopedia (page 113)
    • Abstract (page 113)
    • Introduction (page 113)
    • History of the Project (page 116)
    • Technical and Social Interfaces (page 118)
    • Sol and Other Projects (page 124)
    • Conclusion (page 128)
    • Bibliography (page 131)
  • Exploring Historical RDF With Heml (page 135)
    • Abstract (page 135)
    • Introduction (page 136)
    • The Heml Data Model (page 139)
    • Chronology (page 140)
    • Similar Schemas (page 141)
    • Visualizations (page 142)
    • Areas for Improvement (page 145)
    • RDF and Heml (page 146)
    • Data-entry for Heml RDF (page 148)
    • RDF-based Nested Events (page 148)
    • HemlRDF and the Cidoc-CRM (page 151)
    • Heml's Future (page 153)
    • Projected Work (page 155)
    • Conclusion (page 156)
    • Acknowledgements (page 156)
    • Bibliography (page 156)
  • Digitizing Latin Incunabula: Challenges, Methods, and Possibilities (page 159)
    • Abstract (page 159)
    • Introduction (page 160)
    • Methods (page 162)
    • Data Entry Methodology (page 166)
    • Possibilities (page 169)
    • Conclusion (page 171)
    • Bibliography (page 174)
  • Citation in Classical Studies (page 175)
    • Abstract (page 175)
    • Overview (page 175)
    • Changing Technologies and the Fate of Homer's Commentators (page 177)
    • Citation as a Heuristic (page 179)
    • Identification: What We Cite (page 180)
    • How We Cite Objects (page 186)
    • Syntax of a CTS URN (page 190)
    • Beyond Citation: Architecture (page 193)
    • Conclusion (page 194)
    • Glossary of Technical Terms and Abbreviations (page 194)
    • Bibliography (page 195)
  • Digital Criticism: Editorial Standards for the Homer Multitext (page 197)
    • Abstract (page 197)
    • Digital Criticism: Editorial Standards for The Homer Multitext (page 198)
    • Textual Criticism of an Oral Poem in a Digital Medium (page 200)
    • The Iliad and Odyssey as Oral Poetry (page 202)
    • Variation in the Homeric Corpus: Two Examples (page 203)
    • Representing Multiformity (page 206)
    • Fluidity Vs. Rigidity and a Diachronic Approach to Homeric Poetry (page 211)
    • Foundational Principles of the Homer Multitext (page 218)
    • Bibliography (page 221)
  • Epigraphy in 2017 (page 227)
    • Abstract (page 227)
    • 1. Background (page 228)
      • 1.1 Leiden (page 231)
      • 1.2 Digital Epigraphy Projects (page 233)
      • 1.3 Epidoc (page 234)
    • 2. Digital Leiden (page 237)
    • 3. Epigraphical Databases and Digital Publication (page 241)
    • 4. the Scholar and Digital Texts (page 243)
    • Bibliography (page 245)
  • Digital Geography and Classics (page 247)
    • Abstract (page 247)
    • The View from 2017 (page 247)
    • The View, Explained (And What We Have Left Out) (page 249)
    • The Primacy of Location: a Recent Example Drawn from Google (page 253)
    • Prelude to Geographic Search: Web-based Mapping (page 261)
    • Web-mapping the Geographic Content of Texts: Example of the Perseus Atlas (page 263)
    • The Geo-library, the Web and Geographic Search (page 264)
    • Big Science, Repositories, Neo-Geography and Volunteered Geographic Information (page 268)
    • The Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative (page 271)
    • The Stoa Waypoint Database and the Register of Ancient Geographic Entities (page 271)
    • The Pleiades Project (page 274)
    • Conclusion (page 277)
    • Bibliography (page 278)
  • What Your Teacher Told You is True: Latin Verbs Have Four Principal Parts (page 287)
    • Abstract (page 287)
    • Introduction (page 288)
    • Benefits (page 289)
    • A Realizational KATR Theory for Latin (page 290)
    • The Conjugation-1 Verb Laudare "Praise" (page 291)
    • The VerbA Node (page 294)
    • Auxiliary Nodes (page 296)
    • The Sandhi Node (page 299)
    • Strategies for Building KATR Theories (page 300)
    • An Implicative Katr Theory for Latin (page 301)
      • The Paradigm Chart (page 301)
      • Deriving the Essence of the Paradigm (page 306)
      • Principal Parts (page 308)
      • Grouping (page 312)
      • Generating a KATR Theory (page 314)
    • Conclusion (page 316)
    • Acknowledgments (page 317)
    • Glossary (page 317)
    • Bibliography (page 318)
  • Computational Linguistics and Classical Lexicography (page 321)
    • Abstract (page 321)
    • Where Are We Now? (page 324)
    • Where Do We Want to Be? (page 326)
    • How Do We Get There? (page 330)
      • Word Sense Induction (page 330)
      • Word Sense Disambiguation (page 334)
      • Parsing (page 336)
    • Beyond the Lexicon (page 339)
    • Conclusion (page 341)
    • Bibliography (page 342)
  • Classics in the Million Book Library (page 347)
    • Abstract (page 348)
    • Introduction (page 349)
    • From Curated Collections to Dynamic Corpora (page 353)
    • Services for the Humanities in Very Large Collections (page 360)
    • Fourth-Generation Collections (page 364)
    • The Classical Apographeme (page 369)
    • Three Technical Challenges (page 373)
    • Conclusion (page 378)
    • Appendix: Sample Page Images (page 378)
      • Primary Sources (page 378)
      • Editions of Fragmentary Authors and Works (page 386)
      • Reference Works (page 387)
    • Bibliography (page 396)
  • Conclusion: Cyberinfrastructure, the Scaife Digital Library and Classics in a Digital Age (page 399)
    • Abstract (page 399)
    • Opportunities: e-Philology and e-Classics (page 402)
      • ePhilology and Memographies (page 404)
      • eClassics and Platos Challenge (page 412)
    • Classics and Cyberinfrastructure (page 415)
      • Services for eClassics (page 419)
        • Canonical Text Services (CTS) (page 420)
        • Morphological Analysis (page 421)
        • Syntactic Analysis (page 422)
        • Word sense discovery (page 422)
        • Named entity Identification (page 423)
      • Metrical Analysis (page 424)
        • Translation Support (page 424)
        • Cross Language Information Retrieval (CLIR) (page 425)
        • Citation Identification (page 425)
        • Quotation Identification (page 426)
        • Translation identification (page 426)
        • Text Alignment (page 426)
        • Version Analysis (page 427)
        • Markup Projection (page 427)
      • Collections for ePhilology (page 427)
        • Multitexts (page 431)
        • Parallel Texts (page 432)
        • WordNets and Machine-Actionable Dictionaries (page 433)
        • Treebanks, Linguistic Annotations, and Machine-Actionable Grammars (page 434)
        • Machine-actionable indices of people, places, organizations, etc. (page 435)
        • Propositional Knowledge (page 436)
        • Commentaries (page 437)
      • Publication for a Cyberinfrastructure (page 438)
        • Archives, Libraries and Intellectual Discourse (page 438)
        • Features of Publication in a Digital World (page 445)
      • The Scaife Digital Library (SDL) (page 448)
      • The Work of Scholarship: New Divisions of Labor in the World of Google and Wikipedia (page 452)
      • Bibliography (page 463)
    • Author Biographies (page 471)
    • Index (page 479)