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Commentaries, Catenae and Biblical Tradition


Papers from the Ninth Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament, in association with the COMPAUL project


Edited by H. A. G. Houghton
This collection of original research papers examines early commentaries on the New Testament and the transmission of the biblical text. Focusing principally on Greek and Latin tradition, it provides new insights into the sources and manuscripts of commentators and catenae.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0576-8
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Publication Status: In Print

Series: Texts and Studies 13
Publication Date: Mar 30,2016
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 374
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0576-8
$95.00
$57.00

Biblical commentaries offer fascinating insights into how the foundational texts of Christianity have been understood across the generations. The manuscripts of these commentaries, in Greek, Latin and the other languages of the early Church, shed light on the origins and transmission of these texts. In addition, ancient commentaries also provide some of the earliest surviving evidence for the text of the New Testament. Yet their witness has often been neglected or misrepresented because of the complexity of their presentation and textual tradition.

The COMPAUL project, funded by the European Research Council under the European Union Seventh Framework Programme, investigated the earliest commentaries on Paul as sources for the biblical text. Its work on early Greek and Latin commentary tradition is represented in several of the papers in this volume, including studies of Greek New Testament catena manuscripts and the interplay between Latin biblical commentators and their Greek forerunners. Related topics are treated in contributions from some of the world’s leading scholars in this field, extending the range of enquiry from the first centuries of Christianity to the later reception and transmission of New Testament commentaries in both Byzantine and Western traditions, as well as introducing material in Gothic, Coptic and Arabic.

The result is a comprehensive volume of original research papers which represent the state of the art in the study of commentaries and catenae. The advances in knowledge provided by this collection will both inform and enable further scholarship on the text and transmission of the New Testament.

Biblical commentaries offer fascinating insights into how the foundational texts of Christianity have been understood across the generations. The manuscripts of these commentaries, in Greek, Latin and the other languages of the early Church, shed light on the origins and transmission of these texts. In addition, ancient commentaries also provide some of the earliest surviving evidence for the text of the New Testament. Yet their witness has often been neglected or misrepresented because of the complexity of their presentation and textual tradition.

The COMPAUL project, funded by the European Research Council under the European Union Seventh Framework Programme, investigated the earliest commentaries on Paul as sources for the biblical text. Its work on early Greek and Latin commentary tradition is represented in several of the papers in this volume, including studies of Greek New Testament catena manuscripts and the interplay between Latin biblical commentators and their Greek forerunners. Related topics are treated in contributions from some of the world’s leading scholars in this field, extending the range of enquiry from the first centuries of Christianity to the later reception and transmission of New Testament commentaries in both Byzantine and Western traditions, as well as introducing material in Gothic, Coptic and Arabic.

The result is a comprehensive volume of original research papers which represent the state of the art in the study of commentaries and catenae. The advances in knowledge provided by this collection will both inform and enable further scholarship on the text and transmission of the New Testament.

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Contributor Biography

H. A. G. Houghton

H.A.G. Houghton is Reader in New Testament Textual Scholarship and deputy director of the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing at the University of Birmingham. He was Principal Investigator of the COMPAUL project from 2011 to 2016.

Garrick Allen

Shari Boodts

Lukas Dorfbauer

Gilles Dorival

Carla Falluomini

John Gram

Susan Griffith

Christina Kreinecker

Dr Kreinecker is a Research Fellow currently working on Greek and Latin texts and manuscripts as part of a project on the Earliest Commentaries on Paul as Sources for the Biblical Text funded by the European Research Council. In recent years, she has contributed to a new edition of the Sahidic Coptic version of the Gospel according to John and worked on the Papyrological Commentaries on the New Testament.

William Lamb

Agnès Lorrain

Rosalind MacLachlan

Bruce Morrill

Theodora Panella

David Parker

Gert Partoens

Matthias Schulz

  • Table of Contents (page 7)
  • List of Contributors (page 9)
  • List of Abbreviations (page 13)
  • Preface (page 15)
  • 1. An Introduction to Greek New Testament Commentaries with a Preliminary Checklist of New Testament Catena Manuscripts (H.A.G. Houghton & D.C. Parker) (page 25)
  • 2. The Context of Commentary: Non-Biblical Commentary in the Early Christian Period (R.F. MacLachlan) (page 61)
  • 3. Biblical Catenae: Between Philology and History (Gilles Dorival) (page 89)
  • 4. Catenae and the Art of Memory (William Lamb) (page 107)
  • 5. Parsing Paul: Layout and Sampling Divisions in Pauline Commentaries (Bruce Morrill & John Gram) (page 123)
  • 6. Resurrection Appearences in the Pauline Catenae (Theodora Panella) (page 141)
  • 7. The Reception of Scripture and Exegetical Resources in the Scholia in Apocalypsin (GA 2351) (Garrick V. Allen) (page 165)
  • 8. Thedoret's Text of Romans (Agnes Lorrain) (page 189)
  • 9. Bethania, Bethara, or Bethabara: Fortunatianus of Aquileia and Origen's Commentary on John, with particular reference to John 1:28 (Lukas J. Dorfbauer) (page 201)
  • 10. Ambrose the Appropriator: Borrowed Texts in a New Context in the Commentary on Luke (Susan B. Griffith) (page 223)
  • 11. Rufinus' Translation of Origen's Commentary on Romans: Christina M. Kreinecker) (page 251)
  • 12. The Transmission of Florus of Lyon's Expositio epistolarum beati Pauli apostoli. State of the Art and New Results (Shari Boodts & Gert Partoens) (page 277)
  • 13. Biblical Quotations in the Gothic Commentary on the Gospel of John (Skeireins) (Carla Falluomini) (page 301)
  • 14. An Overview of Research on Bohairic Catena Manuscripts on the Gospels with a Grouping of Arabic and Ethiopic (Ge'ez) Sources and a Checklist of Manuscripts (Matthias Schulz) (page 319)
  • Index of Manuscripts (page 355)
  • Index of Biblical Passages (page 365)
  • Index of Subjects (page 369)
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