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The application of computer technology to the edition and linguistic analysis of biblical texts has provided, in the last thirty years, advanced tools for research purposes as well as for teaching the Bible in the classroom. This discipline requires, nonetheless, a critical evaluation from a historical perspective, examining past and present achievements and failures. This collection of essays evaluates the current tools and considers what is needed to satisfy the increasing demand for software related to the biblical texts, and offers an overview of different trends in computer technology on the Bible.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-930-6
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jun 22,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 191
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-930-6
$145.00

The application of computer technology to the edition and linguistic analysis of biblical texts has provided, in the last thirty years, advanced tools for research purposes as well as for teaching the Bible in the classroom. This discipline requires, nonetheless, a critical evaluation from a historical perspective, examining past and present achievements and failures. There is a necessity to evaluate the current tools and to consider what is needed to satisfy the increasing demand of software related to the analysis of the biblical texts. This has been the task of the International Conference on Bible and Computers hold in El Escorial in 2008, organised by the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. This collection of essays includes the most relevant lectures and papers that have been presented there, and offers a wide overview of different trends in computer assisted technology on the Bible. Research and teaching demands are raised, as well as particularities dependent on the different biblical traditions and languages used in the biblical sources. The contributors of this volume have all long term research and teaching experience in the use of computer technology applied to the linguistic and literary study of the biblical texts. The volume will be of value to Bible scholars of any kind, as well as theologians interested in biblical interpretation and biblical criticism.

Luis Vegas is Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid and President of the Spanish Association for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. He has published on the language of the Dead Sea Scrolls, on the apocalyptic literature, and on the verbal system of biblical Hebrew.

Javier del Barco, Ph.D. (2001) in Hebrew Philology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, is currently a researcher at the CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas). He has published on the verbal system of biblical Hebrew, on the Jewish translations of the Bible in medieval Spain, and on Hebrew manuscripts.

Guadalupe Seijas, Ph.D. (1992) in Hebrew Philology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, teaches at this same university. She has published on biblical literature, on the language and style of the book of Isaiah, and on the verbal system of biblical Hebrew.

The application of computer technology to the edition and linguistic analysis of biblical texts has provided, in the last thirty years, advanced tools for research purposes as well as for teaching the Bible in the classroom. This discipline requires, nonetheless, a critical evaluation from a historical perspective, examining past and present achievements and failures. There is a necessity to evaluate the current tools and to consider what is needed to satisfy the increasing demand of software related to the analysis of the biblical texts. This has been the task of the International Conference on Bible and Computers hold in El Escorial in 2008, organised by the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. This collection of essays includes the most relevant lectures and papers that have been presented there, and offers a wide overview of different trends in computer assisted technology on the Bible. Research and teaching demands are raised, as well as particularities dependent on the different biblical traditions and languages used in the biblical sources. The contributors of this volume have all long term research and teaching experience in the use of computer technology applied to the linguistic and literary study of the biblical texts. The volume will be of value to Bible scholars of any kind, as well as theologians interested in biblical interpretation and biblical criticism.

Luis Vegas is Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid and President of the Spanish Association for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. He has published on the language of the Dead Sea Scrolls, on the apocalyptic literature, and on the verbal system of biblical Hebrew.

Javier del Barco, Ph.D. (2001) in Hebrew Philology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, is currently a researcher at the CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas). He has published on the verbal system of biblical Hebrew, on the Jewish translations of the Bible in medieval Spain, and on Hebrew manuscripts.

Guadalupe Seijas, Ph.D. (1992) in Hebrew Philology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, teaches at this same university. She has published on biblical literature, on the language and style of the book of Isaiah, and on the verbal system of biblical Hebrew.

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Javier del Barco

Luis Vegas Montaner

Guadalupe Seijas de los Ríos-Zarzosa

Janet Dyk

Dean Forbes

Natalio Marcos

Ferdinand Poswick

Emanuel Tov

Drayton Benner

Elizabeth Robar

Christo van der Merwe

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Foreword (page 7)
  • Section I: General and Theoretical Approaches (page 13)
    • From Louvain-la-neuve (1985) to El Escorial in Madrid (2008): 25 Years of Aibi (page 15)
      • Louvain-la-Neuve (1985) (page 15)
      • Jerusalem (1988) (page 17)
      • Tübingen (1991) (page 18)
      • Amsterdam (1994) (page 19)
      • Aix-en-Provence (1997) (page 19)
      • Stellenbosch (2000) (page 20)
      • Madrid (2008) (page 20)
      • Conclusion (page 21)
      • Bibliography (page 22)
    • Major Theoretical Issues from Two Decades of Bible and Computer Conferences (page 25)
      • Texts and Versions (page 25)
      • Hermeneutics (page 27)
      • Hebrew Syntax (page 29)
      • Analysis of Specific Texts (page 34)
      • Concluding Remarks (page 35)
    • The Greek Pentateuch and the Library of Alexandria (page 37)
      • 1. The Library of Alexandria (page 39)
      • 2. A Return to the Letter of Aristeas (page 43)
      • 3. Christian Authors and Byzantine Chroniclers (page 45)
      • 4. The Jewish-Hellenistic Writers and the Library (page 50)
      • 5. Conclusions (page 52)
  • Section II: Technological Developments of Biblical Tools (page 55)
    • Electronic Tools for Biblical Study at Home, at the University, and in the Classroom (page 57)
      • 1. Retrospective (page 57)
      • 2. The Catss Project (page 58)
      • 3. Electronic Resources (page 61)
        • a. Hebrew Bible (page 62)
        • b. Other Sources (page 65)
        • c. Lemmatization and Morphological Analysis (page 67)
      • 4. Present and Future (page 69)
    • Displaying Hebrew and Aramaic on Handheld Devices that Lack Proper Complex Script Support (page 73)
      • Introduction (page 73)
      • Possible Approaches (page 78)
        • Inadequate Possible Approaches (page 78)
        • A Successful Approach (page 79)
        • Issues with the Successful Approach (page 84)
      • Conclusions (page 87)
      • Bibliography (page 88)
    • The Hexapla Project: Traditional Scholarship Meets Modern Technology (page 91)
      • Academic defense of the project (page 92)
      • Theoretical defense of the project (page 92)
      • Initial distribution of the work (page 93)
      • Initial Database Proposal (page 94)
        • Insufficiently understanding databases (page 95)
        • Inadequate understanding of XML (page 97)
        • Foreign languages and ASCII fonts (page 97)
        • Summary of challenges (page 98)
        • Suggestions for other projects (page 98)
      • An Adequate Database (page 98)
        • Suggestions for other projects (page 102)
      • In Search of an Adequate Interface (page 103)
        • An interface for the database (page 103)
      • An Interface for the Scholar (page 104)
        • Suggestions for other projects (page 106)
      • Conclusion (page 107)
  • Section III: Computers and Linguistic Analysis of Biblical Texts (page 109)
    • The Challenge of Consistency (page 111)
      • 1. The Present State of Affairs (page 111)
        • 1.1 Our Stance (page 111)
        • 1.2 Our Representation (page 113)
          • 1.2.1 The Phrase-Marker Tree (page 113)
          • 1.2.2 The Phrase-Marker Graph (page 114)
        • 1.3 Defining and Finding Inconsistency (page 115)
          • 1.3.1 Sources of Inconsistency (page 115)
          • 1.3.2 Random Detection of Inconsistency (page 115)
          • 1.3.3 Standard Systematic Detection of Inconsistency (page 116)
      • 2. A New Direction: Surrogate Texts (page 117)
        • 2.1 Preparation of Surrogate TextsŽ (page 117)
        • 2.2 The Comparison of Surrogate TextsŽ (page 118)
        • 2.3 A Computer-Aided Pilot Study (page 119)
      • 3. Results from the Pilot Study (page 120)
        • 3.1 A Gallery of Inconsistencies (page 120)
          • 3.1.1 Part-of-Speech Assignment Error (page 120)
          • 3.1.2 Formal Structural Ambiguity Differently Resolved (page 120)
          • 3.1.3 Uneven Use of World Knowledge (page 121)
          • 3.1.4 Free Conventions (page 121)
          • 3.1.5 Inconsistent Assignment of Constituent Function (page 122)
          • 3.1.6 Pseudo-Inconsistency (page 123)
        • 3.2 Phrase Marker Accuracy Estimates (page 124)
      • 4. Future Directions (page 125)
      • Bibliography (page 126)
    • The Computer and Complex Phrase Structure: A Unified Approach to Embedding, Gapping and Recursion (page 129)
      • 1. Complex Structures (page 129)
      • 2. A Unified Approach to Complex Structures„ Basic Units and Expansions (page 131)
        • 2.1 Basic Units: Formal Indications„Parts of Speech: Eachits own Dimensions (page 132)
          • 2.1.1 Nominal Endings (page 132)
          • 2.1.2 Verbal Endings (page 133)
        • 2.2 Expansions (page 133)
          • 2.2.1 Obligatory Expansions (page 133)
            • 2.2.1.1 Nominal Phrases (page 133)
            • 2.2.1.2 Verbal Phrases (page 133)
          • 2.2.1.3 Connectors (page 134)
            • 2.2.1.3.1 Prepositions„ between a Noun Phrase or a Verb Phrase and the larger Context (page 134)
            • 2.1.3.2 Subordinating Conjunctions„ between a Verb Phraseor Nominal Clause and the larger Context (page 134)
            • 2.1.3.3 Coordinating Conjunctions„ between Units of anequal Level (page 134)
          • 2.2.2 Optional Extensions (page 135)
            • 2.2.2.1 Noun Phrases (page 135)
            • 2.2.2.2 Verb Phrases (page 135)
            • 2.2.2.3 Connectors (page 135)
            • 2.2.2.4 Other parts of speech (page 135)
        • 2.3 Summary (page 136)
      • 3. Complex Structures as Basic Units and Expansions (page 136)
      • Conclusions (page 144)
    • Biblical Hebrew Linguistics as Corpus Linguistics (page 147)
      • 1. Introduction (page 147)
      • 2. Corpus Linguistics (page 150)
      • 3. Why is the Cognitive Linguistic (Cl) Paradigm So Useful? (page 153)
      • 4. Procedure (page 156)
      • 5. Example (page 158)
        • 5.1 Categories of use (page 159)
        • 5.2 Qualitative inferences from quantitative data (page 166)
      • 6. Conclusions (page 167)
      • Bibliography (page 167)
    • The Series of Woes in Pre-Exilic Prophecy: A Computer-Assisted Study on Syntax and Semantics (page 171)
      • I. Introduction (page 171)
      • II. The Problem (page 176)
      • III. The Cases (page 180)
      • IV. Conclusions (page 185)
      • References (page 186)
  • Index of Authors (page 189)