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Cultural memory is the shared reproduction and recollection of what has been learned and retained, normally treated as “the cultural heritage”. The purpose of this book, the first product of the research program Cultural Memory in Biblical Exegesis, is to study how memory is inscribed and embodied in biblical culture and its surrounding area. The essays in this volume seek to open new investigations into cultural memory in biblical and cognate studies, and to include a plethora of methods and perspectives such as the relationship between cultural memory approach and post-colonialism, globalism and epistemology.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-165-7
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 10,2012
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 400
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-165-7
$208.00
$145.60
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Cultural memory is a way of dealing with the past in social and cultural life. It transposes the notion of memory as individuals’ negotiation and representation of past experience into the collective and cultural area. Cultural memory is the shared reproduction and recalling of what has been learned and retained, normally treated as “the cultural heritage”. It also involves transformation and innovation. As opposed to individual memory, it brings social institutions and power to play. The notion of location and space (Landscape, ethnoscape, mental maps) is a major contributing factor in making the fragmented retrieved past a coherent whole. Cultural memories appear as palimpsests of material artifacts (including buildings and monuments), text, pictures and ritual practice. Especially relevant is the negotiation of cultural memory between local identity and global culture in this area. The purpose of this book is to study how memory is inscribed and embodied in biblical culture and its surrounding area. When dealing with a new field in research several questions appear, such as those dealing with previous approaches relevant for the cultural memory research: i.e. historiography, folklore, tradition history. We need to join forces to open new gates to cultural memory in biblical and cognate studies, and to include a plethora of methods and perspectives in present research. Such collaborative efforts will support the much-needed reflection on the relationship between cultural memory approach and post-colonialism, globalism and epistemology.

Cultural memory is a way of dealing with the past in social and cultural life. It transposes the notion of memory as individuals’ negotiation and representation of past experience into the collective and cultural area. Cultural memory is the shared reproduction and recalling of what has been learned and retained, normally treated as “the cultural heritage”. It also involves transformation and innovation. As opposed to individual memory, it brings social institutions and power to play. The notion of location and space (Landscape, ethnoscape, mental maps) is a major contributing factor in making the fragmented retrieved past a coherent whole. Cultural memories appear as palimpsests of material artifacts (including buildings and monuments), text, pictures and ritual practice. Especially relevant is the negotiation of cultural memory between local identity and global culture in this area. The purpose of this book is to study how memory is inscribed and embodied in biblical culture and its surrounding area. When dealing with a new field in research several questions appear, such as those dealing with previous approaches relevant for the cultural memory research: i.e. historiography, folklore, tradition history. We need to join forces to open new gates to cultural memory in biblical and cognate studies, and to include a plethora of methods and perspectives in present research. Such collaborative efforts will support the much-needed reflection on the relationship between cultural memory approach and post-colonialism, globalism and epistemology.

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Contributor Biography

Pernille Carstens

Director of the research centre Bible and Cultural Memory at University of Copenhagen from 2009. Employment at University of Aarhus 1993-2008 as assistant, associate professor and post doc, Phd. 1997, cand. theol 1993.

Trine Hasselbalch

Niels Peter Lemche

Izaak Hulster

Dolores Kamrada

Rüdiger Schmitt

Terje Stordalen

David J. Chalcraft

Sandra Hübenthal

John Van Seters

Ehud Ben Zvi

Ehud Ben Zvi is a professor in the Dept. of History & Classics at the University of Alberta. He has authored or (co)-edited about twenty volumes and written numerous essays primarily on ancient Israel, its intellectual history, social memory, historiography, and prophetic books.

Johannes Schnocks

Emmanuel Nathan

Ida Fröhlich

Philip Davies

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Acknowledgments (page 9)
  • Abbreviations (page 13)
  • List of Contributors (page 15)
  • Introduction. The Bible and Cultural Memory - Philip R. Davies (page 17)
  • I: The Old Testament and Cultural Memory (page 27)
    • Old Testament as the Art of Remembering: Landscape as Paideia - Pernille Carstens (page 29)
    • His Place Does not Recognize Him (Job 7:10): Reflections of Non-Inscribed Memory in the Book of Job - Terje Stordalen (page 47)
    • Cultural Memory and the Invention of Biblical Israel - John Van Seters (page 69)
    • The Copenhagen School and Cultural Memory - Niels Peter Lemche (page 97)
    • Extending the Borders of Cultural Memory Research? - Izaak de Hulster (page 111)
  • II: The Old Testament and Forgetting (page 153)
    • The Study of Forgetting and the Forgotten in Ancient Israelite Discourse/s: Observations and Test Cases - Ehud Ben Zvi (page 155)
    • Cultural Amnesia - Niels Peter Lemche (page 175)
  • III: Methodological and Terminological Issues (page 189)
    • Social and Cultural Memory in Biblical Exegesis: The Quest for an Adequate Application - Sandra Hübenthal (page 191)
    • Jane Addams, the Devil Baby of Chicago and the (Classical) Sociology of Gendered Memory in Ancient Biblical Social Worlds - David Chalcraft (page 217)
  • IV: Cultural Memory Perspectives Applied to the Old Testament (page 243)
    • Yahwehs Wars in the Pentateuch and Their Function for the Cultural Memory of Ancient Israel - Rüdiger Schmitt (page 245)
    • The Temple as a Symbol of Power in Inner-Biblical and Postbiblical Exegesis - Ida Fröhlich (page 261)
    • Urim and Thummim - Dolores G. Kamrada (page 283)
    • Cultural Memory and Family Religion - Rüdiger Schmitt (page 307)
    • The Torah as Canon of Masterpieces: Remembering in Archives - Pernille Carstens (page 325)
  • V: Cultural Memory Perspectives Applied Beyond the Old Testament (page 341)
    • Was the Maccabean Revolt the First Religiously Motivated War in History (J. Assmann)? Exegetical, Historical and Hermeneutical Contributions to a Recent Discussion - Johannes Schnocks (page 343)
    • Memories of the Veil: the Covenantal Contrasts in Christian-Jewish Encounter - Emmanuel Nathan (page 359)
  • Index of Authors (page 383)
  • Biblical References (page 391)
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