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The ancient myth of a hero who slays a mythical beast worked its way into the lore of early Christianity. Willy Hengstenberg discusses here the sources for the dragon-slaying legend attributed to two separate fourth-century figures named Theodore.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-773-9
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Publication Status: In Print
Series: Analecta Gorgiana 436
Publication Date: Jan 21,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 69
Language: German
ISBN: 978-1-60724-773-9
$46.00
Your price: $27.60

The legend of a hero conquering a mythical beast is present in many different forms in the folk history of many different cultures. Thus, it is not surprising that this legend is found among the stories of early Christian saints. The most well-known dragon slayer legend in Christian lore is that of St. George, but this is not the dragon legend in Christian history. In the present article, Willy Hengstenberg discusses the dragon fight narrative attributed to two separate figures named Theodore: St. Theodore of Amasea (also known as Theodore Tyro or Theodore of Tyre) and St. Theodore of Euphraita (also known as Theodore Stratelates). The two Theodores are near contemporaries both with one another and with St. George, so it is understandable why there would have been confusion over the correct subject of the dragon legend. This article, which was originally published in two parts but is combined here into one, surveys the sources for the legend of Theodore and discusses the issues involved in the transmission of the story and the eventual dual attribution.

The legend of a hero conquering a mythical beast is present in many different forms in the folk history of many different cultures. Thus, it is not surprising that this legend is found among the stories of early Christian saints. The most well-known dragon slayer legend in Christian lore is that of St. George, but this is not the dragon legend in Christian history. In the present article, Willy Hengstenberg discusses the dragon fight narrative attributed to two separate figures named Theodore: St. Theodore of Amasea (also known as Theodore Tyro or Theodore of Tyre) and St. Theodore of Euphraita (also known as Theodore Stratelates). The two Theodores are near contemporaries both with one another and with St. George, so it is understandable why there would have been confusion over the correct subject of the dragon legend. This article, which was originally published in two parts but is combined here into one, surveys the sources for the legend of Theodore and discusses the issues involved in the transmission of the story and the eventual dual attribution.

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Contributor

Willy Hengstenberg

  • Untitled (page 5)