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Der Nomokanon Miha'ils von Malig


Translation and Introduction by Franz Cöln
The Nomocanons of the Eastern Orthodox traditions are valuable historical sources for the church traditions they represent. Franz Cöln presents here the collated text of a Nomocanon attributed to Miha’il of Malig and preserved in Garshuni and Arabic manuscripts.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-715-9
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 424
Publication Date: Dec 24,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 426
Language: German
ISBN: 978-1-60724-715-9
$133.00
$93.10

The Nomocanons of the Eastern Orthodox traditions offer valuable information and insight into the history of the people who recorded them and the churches they represented. These Nomocanons were often overlooked in favor of other, more traditional sources, but eventually they were recognized for the intrinsic historical value they carried. At the beginning of this article, Franz Cöln notes that many have recognized the value of the Nonocanons, but laments that some traditions are still neglected—specifically the Coptic Alexandrine tradition preserved variously in Coptic, Arabic and Ethiopic. In order to rectify this neglect, Cöln publishes here the collated text of three manuscripts of the Nomocanon attributed to Michael (Miha’il) of Malig. Two of the manuscripts preserve the text in Arabic script, but the fullest witness of the text is in the third manuscript, preserved in Garshuni. Cöln uses the latter manuscript as the base text for the collation, but includes variants from the Arabic manuscripts in an apparatus. Cöln provides an introduction to the text, including a discussion of the identity of Miha’il and his relationship to the author of a Synaxarion attributed to the same name. Cöln also supplements the text of the Nomocanon with a German translation.

The Nomocanons of the Eastern Orthodox traditions offer valuable information and insight into the history of the people who recorded them and the churches they represented. These Nomocanons were often overlooked in favor of other, more traditional sources, but eventually they were recognized for the intrinsic historical value they carried. At the beginning of this article, Franz Cöln notes that many have recognized the value of the Nonocanons, but laments that some traditions are still neglected—specifically the Coptic Alexandrine tradition preserved variously in Coptic, Arabic and Ethiopic. In order to rectify this neglect, Cöln publishes here the collated text of three manuscripts of the Nomocanon attributed to Michael (Miha’il) of Malig. Two of the manuscripts preserve the text in Arabic script, but the fullest witness of the text is in the third manuscript, preserved in Garshuni. Cöln uses the latter manuscript as the base text for the collation, but includes variants from the Arabic manuscripts in an apparatus. Cöln provides an introduction to the text, including a discussion of the identity of Miha’il and his relationship to the author of a Synaxarion attributed to the same name. Cöln also supplements the text of the Nomocanon with a German translation.

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Contributor

Rev. Franz Joseph Cöln