Search
Filters

Divine and Human Hate in the Ancient Near East: A Lexical and Contextual Analysis


A Lexical and Contextual Analysis


Divine and Human Hate in the Ancient Near East studies lexemes for ‘hate’ in Biblical Hebrew, Ugaritic, and Akkadian. Riley conducts a lexical study of three ‘hate’ terms, along with comparative analysis of divine and human hate in biblical, Ugaritic, and Mesopotamian literature.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0695-6
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 3,2017
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 158
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0695-6
$99.00
$59.40

Divine emotion is a ubiquitous feature of ancient Near Eastern documents. These texts regularly assign the same spectrum of feelings experienced by humans (e.g., love, anger, joy) to the divine realm. Divine and Human Hate in the Ancient Near East: A Lexical and Contextual Analysis is a comprehensive study of divine hate. On seventeen separate occasions, the Hebrew Bible describes Yahweh as hateful. But an ascription of hate extends to more ancient Near Eastern deities than Yahweh. Canaanite texts from Ugarit and Akkadian documents also characterize their gods as hateful. The fundamental question guiding this inquiry is, is Yahweh’s hate comparable to instances of divine hate from the greater ancient Near East or is his hate different?

Methodologically, Divine and Human Hate is a lexical study of Hebrew, Ugaritic, and Akkadian lexemes for hate originating in divine figures. But since the ancients expressed divine emotion with terms from their own experiences, human hate receives attention as well. Divine and Human Hate is also a contextual analysis of divine and human hate in biblical Hebrew, Ugaritic, and Akkadian. Therefore, the book’s focus is comparing and contrasting instances of divine and human hate in biblical and cognate writings.

Divine emotion is a ubiquitous feature of ancient Near Eastern documents. These texts regularly assign the same spectrum of feelings experienced by humans (e.g., love, anger, joy) to the divine realm. Divine and Human Hate in the Ancient Near East: A Lexical and Contextual Analysis is a comprehensive study of divine hate. On seventeen separate occasions, the Hebrew Bible describes Yahweh as hateful. But an ascription of hate extends to more ancient Near Eastern deities than Yahweh. Canaanite texts from Ugarit and Akkadian documents also characterize their gods as hateful. The fundamental question guiding this inquiry is, is Yahweh’s hate comparable to instances of divine hate from the greater ancient Near East or is his hate different?

Methodologically, Divine and Human Hate is a lexical study of Hebrew, Ugaritic, and Akkadian lexemes for hate originating in divine figures. But since the ancients expressed divine emotion with terms from their own experiences, human hate receives attention as well. Divine and Human Hate is also a contextual analysis of divine and human hate in biblical Hebrew, Ugaritic, and Akkadian. Therefore, the book’s focus is comparing and contrasting instances of divine and human hate in biblical and cognate writings.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor Biography

Andrew Riley

Andrew J. Riley (Ph.D., Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion) is an Academic Advisor in Arts & Humanities at The University of Texas at San Antonio. He previously served as Visiting Assistant Professor of Hebrew Bible at the University of Oregon.

Abbreviations and Symbols (vii)
Preface (xi)
Chapter 1: Introduction (1)
PART 1: HUMAN HATE
Chapter 2: The Emotional Extreme of the Spectrum: Literal Hate (15)
   Hate in Non-marital Family Relationships (15)
   Hate Leading to Physical Harm and Murder in Non-kinship Contexts (18)
   Hate Speech (20)
   Hate Designating an Enemy (21)
   Hate toward Vice (22)
   Hate toward Virtue (23)
   Hate Magic (24)
   Synthesis (25)
Chapter 3: The Center of the Spectrum: Some Emotion and Some Metaphor (27)
   Marital Hate Reflecting Demotion in Status (27)
   Ambiguous Marital Hate (30)
   Hate as a Term Indicating Marital and Family Divorce (35)
   Synthesis (38)
Chapter 4: The Nonemotive Extreme of the Spectrum: Metaphorical Hate (41)
   Hate in a Covenant between Equals (43)
   Hate in a Covenant between Suzerain and Vassal (45)
   Hate Used as Hyperbole (48)
   Hate Designating Rejection (49)
   Synthesis (49)
PART 2: DIVINE HATE
Chapter 5: Hate as a Reflex to a Broken Covenant (53)
   Biblical Hebrew (54)
   Akkadian (62)
   Synthesis (65)
Chapter 6: Hate toward the Cult (67)
   Hate toward a Forbidden Cult Practice (67)
   Hate toward an Accepted Cult Practice (70)
Chapter 7: Hate Toward Vice (79)
   Biblical Hebrew (79)
   Ugaritic (86)
   Akkadian (89)
   Synthesis (92)
Chapter 8: Hate as Part of a God’s Unfavorable Portrait (95)
   Ugaritic (95)
   Akkadian (97)
   Synthesis (103)
Chapter 9: Conclusion (107)
Appendix 1: Hate’s Word Field in Biblical Hebrew, Ugaritic, and Akkadian (111)
Appendix 2: שׂנא in Mal 2:16 (113)
Appendix 3: zêru in Nisaba and Wheat? (115)
Bibliography (117)
Index (137)

Customers who bought this item also bought

Proclus on the transition from metaphysical being to natural becoming

A new reading of the Platonic theory of Forms
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0692-5
This volume examines the historical end of the Platonic tradition in relation to creation theories of the natural world through Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus (412-485) elaboration of an investigation of Plato’s theory of metaphysical archetypal Forms.
$59.40

Globalization and Economic Justice

From Terrorism to Global Peace
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0735-9
A collection of articles dedicated to raising global awareness and the restraining of growing injustice, while supporting the building up of a community that guarantees basic rights in a democratic society.
$45.00

Lactantius the Theologian

Lactantius and the Doctrine of Providence
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0723-6
This book examines the doctrine of providence as it appears in the works of the North African Latin apologist, L. Caecilius Firmianus Lactantius.
$72.00

Hippolytus of Rome: Commentary on Daniel and 'Chronicon'

Commentary on Daniel and 'Chronicon'
By T. C. Schmidt; Contribution by Nick Nicholas
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0658-1
This volume contains an English translation and introduction to Hippolytus of Rome's Commentary on Daniel and his Chronicon. Both works are the first writings of their kind. The commentary is the earliest extant Christian commentary on a book of the Bible and the Chronicon is the first extant Christian historical work.
$57.00