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English Grammar Guide for Language Students


Especially students of Biblical Hebrew, New Testament Greek, Latin, and related modern languages


Too many incoming students are fluent in English but unable to discuss the language grammatically. Introductory language courses and textbooks often assume a proficiency and familiarity with grammatical terms that is not possessed by the students. This guide delivers an understanding of English grammar starting from simple concepts and presupposing no background or vocabulary. This book is designed as a textbook and a reference for students beginning a New Testament Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Aramaic or Latin course.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-864-2
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Gorgias Handbooks 27
Publication Date: Apr 27,2013
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 376
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-864-2
$65.00
$39.00

Grammar explains how words work together to make sense. People can be fluent in English without knowing how to discuss it grammatically. This guide delivers an understanding of English grammar that is often assumed in language courses and textbooks, starting with simple concepts and progressing to the more complex. Many today have not been taught English grammar in ways that help them study other languages, and this book is designed as a textbook and a reference for students beginning a New Testament Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Aramaic or Latin course. The basic units of simple sentences are discussed in considerable detail, and accompanied by examples and exercises, so that students can use that knowledge to unravel any sentence without becoming lost along the way. The book also contains an extensive glossary explaining terms in considerable detail, and refers users to further explanations and summaries within the book, as well as an annotated bibliography.

Grammar explains how words work together to make sense. People can be fluent in English without knowing how to discuss it grammatically. This guide delivers an understanding of English grammar that is often assumed in language courses and textbooks, starting with simple concepts and progressing to the more complex. Many today have not been taught English grammar in ways that help them study other languages, and this book is designed as a textbook and a reference for students beginning a New Testament Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Aramaic or Latin course. The basic units of simple sentences are discussed in considerable detail, and accompanied by examples and exercises, so that students can use that knowledge to unravel any sentence without becoming lost along the way. The book also contains an extensive glossary explaining terms in considerable detail, and refers users to further explanations and summaries within the book, as well as an annotated bibliography.

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Contributor Biography

Peter Burton

Peter Burton is founder and Director of the Cross Institute, a Christian research and educational body, and was co-founder and co-chair of the Biblical Lexicography and the Applied Linguistics for Biblical Languages units of the Society of Biblical Literature. He has formally studied English, Latin, Classical Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac, Biblical Greek, French, Italian and some related languages, and has taught most of these. He has related degrees from the University of Sydney and Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and is currently engaged in detailed research concerning the Greek middle voice.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Acknowledgments (page 13)
  • 1. Scope and Purpose of the Book (page 15)
  • 2. What is grammar? (page 17)
  • 3. Phrases and Sentences (page 19)
  • 4. Four types of simple sentences (page 21)
  • 5. Two parts of a simple sentence: subject and predicate I (page 23)
  • 6. Functions of words in sentences (page 37)
  • 7. Parts of Speech I (page 41)
    • 7.1 Eight parts of speech in English (page 41)
    • 7.2 Verbs (page 42)
    • 7.3 Nouns (page 47)
    • 7.4 Pronouns (page 50)
    • 7.5 Adjectives (page 52)
    • 7.6 Adverbs (page 56)
    • 7.7 Note about Substantives (page 60)
    • 7.8 Useful convention: Adjectives qualify and adverbs modify (page 61)
  • 8. Two Parts of a Simple Sentence: Subject and Predicate II (page 63)
    • 8.1 Subject (page 63)
    • 8.2 Predicate (page 69)
  • 9. Definition of a phrase (page 79)
  • 10. Transitivity of Verbs: Transitive verbs and intransitive verbs (page 81)
  • 11. Voice of Verbs (page 83)
    • 11.1 Active Voice and Passive Voice (page 83)
    • 11.2 Middle Voice (page 90)
    • 11.3 Deponency (page 92)
  • 12. Tense of Verbs (page 95)
    • 12.1 Present tense, future tense and past tense (page 95)
    • 12.2 Pluperfect Tense (page 96)
    • 12.3 Examples of tense forms of the verb do (page 97)
    • 12.4 Tense in Greek and Hebrew (page 100)
  • 13. Aspect of Verbs (page 103)
  • 14. Mood of Verbs (page 107)
  • 15. Summary of components of a simple sentence: one subject and predicate (page 109)
  • 16. Parts of Speech II (page 111)
  • 17. Case (page 115)
    • 17.1 Nominative case (subjective case) and accusative case (objective case) (page 115)
    • 17.2 Possessive case (genitive case) and apostrophes (page 116)
    • 17.3 Dative Case (page 121)
    • 17.4 Vocative Case (page 122)
    • 17.5 Cases following prepositions (page 122)
    • 17.6 Common NT Greek cases (page 123)
    • 17.7 Ablative and locative cases in Latin (page 123)
    • 17.8 Cases in Hebrew (page 123)
  • 18. Person (page 125)
  • 19. Number (page 129)
  • 20. Grammatical Gender (page 133)
  • 21. Tables of personal pronouns and pronominal adjectives III (page 135)
  • 22. Agreement I (page 137)
  • 23. Apposition: Words in apposition to nouns and pronouns (page 139)
  • 24. Types of Pronouns and Pronominal Adjectives I (page 141)
  • 25. Non-finite verbs (page 147)
    • 25.1 Finite and non-finite verbs (page 147)
    • 25.2 Gerunds (page 147)
    • 25.3 Participles (page 151)
    • 25.4 Infinitives (page 160)
    • 25.5 Reflexive pronouns and non-finite verbs (page 167)
  • 26. Grammar and Translation Issues II (page 169)
  • 27. Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs (page 171)
  • 28. Phrases II (page 177)
  • 29. Simple sentence components and expansion using non-finite verbs and phrases (page 185)
  • 30. Clauses I: Clauses, simple sentences and composite sentences (page 187)
  • 31. Clauses II: Types of Subordinate Clauses (Dependent Clauses) (page 193)
    • 31.1 Adjectival Clauses (page 193)
    • 31.2 Relative conjunctions (page 195)
    • 31.3 Adverbial Clauses (page 195)
    • 31.4 Noun Clauses (page 199)
  • 32. Sentence Expansion II: step 4 (page 203)
  • 33. Conjunctions (page 205)
  • 34. Phrases III: Conjunctions and temporal phrases (page 211)
  • 35. Types of Pronouns and Pronomial Adjectives II (page 213)
  • 36. Agreement II (page 217)
  • 37. Distinguishing present gerunds from present participles in the active voice (page 219)
  • 38. Clauses III: Six types of Questions (page 223)
  • 39 Clauses IV: Direct and Indirect Speech (page 227)
  • 40. Word Order II (page 229)
  • 41. Parts of Speech Summary II (page 231)
  • 42. Summary of simple sentence components (page 233)
  • 43. Sentence expansion: adding clauses (page 237)
  • 44. Summary of Sentence Analysis Guidelines and Examples (page 239)
  • 45. A Difficult Example (page 247)
    • 45.1 Ephesians 1:15-23 in various English translations (page 247)
    • 45.2 Ephesians 1:15-23 partially analyzed RSV (page 251)
  • 46. Grammar and translation issues III: A basic rule of translation (page 259)
  • 47. Verbs with double objects Part II (page 261)
  • 48. Idioms using an indefinite pronoun or an indefinite adverb (page 263)
  • 49. Bibliography and Suggested Reading (page 265)
  • 50. Grammar Reference Glossary and Index (page 281)
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