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European Merchants in the Medieval Indies


The Evidence of Commercial Documents


Commercial sources on journeying to the east after Marco Polo; the gradual closing of trade between Italy and China or India under the hostile or defensive rulers of the lands in between.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-878-9
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 959
Publication Date: Apr 23,2014
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 25
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-878-9
$35.00

After Marco Polo, the roads to the East were travelled by many Italians, but they closed gradually as hostile rulers took over. This paper summarizes much of what can be found in commercial and legal sources: A Florentine description of the three routes to the East: through the Red Sea, Persia, and the northern steppes; the Genoese Vivaldi brothers, who attempted to circumnavigate Africe and did not return; another Vivaldi, who died in India, and the complications of his estate; a Venetian party which went to India and returned with pearls, as revealed in the lawsuit when they returned, and the route they took, from Astrakhan through Afghanistan; the fifteenth-century Genoese who fell sick on his way to the East, and the trouble he got in for going to Tabriz; and the massacre which closed Persia to the Italians for good.

After Marco Polo, the roads to the East were travelled by many Italians, but they closed gradually as hostile rulers took over. This paper summarizes much of what can be found in commercial and legal sources: A Florentine description of the three routes to the East: through the Red Sea, Persia, and the northern steppes; the Genoese Vivaldi brothers, who attempted to circumnavigate Africe and did not return; another Vivaldi, who died in India, and the complications of his estate; a Venetian party which went to India and returned with pearls, as revealed in the lawsuit when they returned, and the route they took, from Astrakhan through Afghanistan; the fifteenth-century Genoese who fell sick on his way to the East, and the trouble he got in for going to Tabriz; and the massacre which closed Persia to the Italians for good.

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Contributor

Robert Sabatino Lopez

  • I (page 5)
  • II (page 10)
  • III (page 15)
  • IV (page 22)