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In the twelfth and early thirteenth centuries, The Song of Songs was a favorite book of Cistercian monks. Bernard of Clairvaux, Gilbert of Hoyland, and John of Ford, as well as William of Saint Thierry, read it as a dialogue between Christ the Bridegroom and the human soul, the Bride. William of Saint Thierry began composing his commentary soon after entering the Cistercian abbey of Signy in 1135. Having left behind a busy life as a Benedictine abbot and author of theological treatises, he turned to writing meditations on Scripture as the means of listening to the voice of the Beloved.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-194-2
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Apr 13,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 219
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-194-2
$138.00
$82.80

In the twelfth and early thirteenth centuries, the Song of Songs was a favorite book of Cistercian monks. Bernard of Clairvaux, Gilbert of Hoyland, and John of Ford, as well as William of Saint Thierry, read it as a dialogue between Christ the Bridegroom and the human soul, the Bride. William of Saint Thierry began composing his commentary soon after entering the Cistercian abbey of Signy in 1135. Having left behind a busy life as a Benedictine abbot and author of theological treatises, he turned to writing meditations on Scripture as the means of listening to the voice of the Beloved. It is therefore ironic that he broke off his commentary on the Song, never to return to it, to alert the Church in France to the teaching of Peter Abelard and then began to compose two treatises correcting what he deeply believed were Abelard’s theological errors.

In the twelfth and early thirteenth centuries, the Song of Songs was a favorite book of Cistercian monks. Bernard of Clairvaux, Gilbert of Hoyland, and John of Ford, as well as William of Saint Thierry, read it as a dialogue between Christ the Bridegroom and the human soul, the Bride. William of Saint Thierry began composing his commentary soon after entering the Cistercian abbey of Signy in 1135. Having left behind a busy life as a Benedictine abbot and author of theological treatises, he turned to writing meditations on Scripture as the means of listening to the voice of the Beloved. It is therefore ironic that he broke off his commentary on the Song, never to return to it, to alert the Church in France to the teaching of Peter Abelard and then began to compose two treatises correcting what he deeply believed were Abelard’s theological errors.

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Contributor

William of Saint Thierry

Mother Columba Hart OSB

J.-M. Déchanet OSB

  • CONTENTS (page 6)
  • SECOND SONGS (page 7)
  • INTRODUCTION (page 9)
  • PREFACE (page 53)
  • FIRST SONG: PRELUDE OR ARGUMENT (page 71)
  • SECOND SONG: PRELUDE OR ARGUMENT (page 167)
  • ANALYTIC INDEX (page 215)