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Foundations for Syriac Lexicography V


Colloquia of the International Syriac Language Project


The fifth published colloquia of the International Syriac Language Project (ISLP), presenting papers from an international team of authors working to develop contemporary, interdisciplinary approaches to linguistics and lexicography.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61719-027-8
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Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jun 17,2013
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 180
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61719-027-8
$165.00
$115.50

The fifth published colloquia of the International Syriac Language Project (ISLP), presenting papers from an international team of authors working to develop contemporary, interdisciplinary approaches to linguistics and lexicography.

Reinier de Blois proposes innovative ways that the discipline of cognitive linguistics can be used to help lexicographers determine the meaning of words. Marie-Louis Craig reviews the methodologies and motivations behind several early English lexicographers of Hebrew. Janet Dyk compares the Masoretic and Peshitta versions of Psalm 25. Marketta Liljestrom discusses the Syrohexapla as a source for lexicographers.

Craig Morrison provides a detailed study of hwā qātel and hwā qĕtīl constructions in the Peshitta Old Testament. Paul Stevenson offers a test case for semantic componential analysis in his second study of the motion verbs in the Peshitta of Exodus, chapters 1–19. And Beryl Turner provides a methodological study of the preposition lwāt in preparation for the creation of a new Syriac-English dictionary. This volume brings together the latest research in Syriac linguistics and lexicography in a way that would also benefit those working in Greek and other Semitic languages.

The fifth published colloquia of the International Syriac Language Project (ISLP), presenting papers from an international team of authors working to develop contemporary, interdisciplinary approaches to linguistics and lexicography.

Reinier de Blois proposes innovative ways that the discipline of cognitive linguistics can be used to help lexicographers determine the meaning of words. Marie-Louis Craig reviews the methodologies and motivations behind several early English lexicographers of Hebrew. Janet Dyk compares the Masoretic and Peshitta versions of Psalm 25. Marketta Liljestrom discusses the Syrohexapla as a source for lexicographers.

Craig Morrison provides a detailed study of hwā qātel and hwā qĕtīl constructions in the Peshitta Old Testament. Paul Stevenson offers a test case for semantic componential analysis in his second study of the motion verbs in the Peshitta of Exodus, chapters 1–19. And Beryl Turner provides a methodological study of the preposition lwāt in preparation for the creation of a new Syriac-English dictionary. This volume brings together the latest research in Syriac linguistics and lexicography in a way that would also benefit those working in Greek and other Semitic languages.

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Contributor Biography

Jonathan Loopstra

Jonathan Loopstra is an Associate Professor of History at University of Northwestern in St. Paul, MN. He holds an M.St. degree in Syriac Studies from the University of Oxford, a M.A. from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and a Ph.D. from the Catholic University of America. He works primarily in the fields of Patristics and Middle Eastern Studies, with a particular interest in the history and theology of various Christian communities of the Middle East.

Michael Sokoloff

Dr. Michael Sokoloff, Jerusalem, Israel, is an emeritus professor of Hebrew and Semitic Languages who taught at Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel. His scholarly work centers on the Aramaic literary dialects of the first millenium CE written by both Jews and Christians. He has published five Aramaic dictionaries of dialects from this period, the most relevant for the present work being A Syriac Lexicon, Eisenbrauns and Gorgias Press, 2009; 2nd printing 2012.

Reinier de Blois

Janet Dyk

Craig E. Morrison

Craig E. Morrison is an associate professor of Aramaic at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome.

Beryl Turner

Beryl Turner is co-founder with Terry Falla of the International Syriac Language Project, and works with him on the lexicon A Key to the Peshitta Gospels.

Marie-Louise Craig

Marketta Liljeström

Paul Stevenson

  • Contents (page 5)
  • Table of Contents (page 7)
  • Abbreviations (page 13)
  • Acknowledgements (page 15)
  • Series Preface (page 17)
  • A Farewell With a Future (page 19)
  • Introduction (page 21)
  • Chapter 1: The Semantic Structure of Biblical Hebrew (page 23)
    • Chapter 2: Pioneers and No Through Roads: The Story of the Early Hebrew-English Lexicons (page 41)
      • 1. Introduction (page 41)
      • 2. Context, Motivations, and Resources (page 42)
      • 3. Hebrew-English Lexicons from 1593 to 1656 (page 45)
        • 3.1. Udall (c. 1560…1592/3) (page 45)
        • 3.2. Edward Leigh (1603…1671) (page 46)
        • 3.3. Alexander Rowley (page 47)
        • 3.4. William Robertson (fl. 1651…1685) (page 48)
      • 4. Hebrew-English Lexicons in the Eighteenth Century (page 49)
        • 4.1. Sharpe (1713…1771) (page 49)
        • 4.2. Taylor (1694…1761) (page 50)
        • 4.3. Parkhurst (1728…1797) (page 51)
      • 5. Post-Parkhurst (page 52)
      • 6. Conclusion (page 53)
    • Chapter 3: The Peshitta Rendering of Psalm 25: Spelling, Synonyms, and Syntax (page 63)
      • 1. Characteristics of Translations in General (page 63)
        • 1.1. Overall Length (page 64)
        • 1.2. Explicitation (page 64)
        • 1.3. Lexical Density (page 64)
        • 1.4. Simplification (page 65)
        • 1.5. Levelling Out (page 65)
      • 2. Spelling (page 65)
        • 2.1. Acrostic (page 65)
        • 2.2. Rendering Influenced by Shape or Sound of the Hebrew Word (page 68)
        • 2.3. Relation to Translation Universals (page 69)
      • 3. Synonyms (page 69)
        • 3.1. Syriac Renders a Single Hebrew Word in More Than One Way (page 69)
        • 3.2. Syriac Renders Multiple Hebrew Words Using the Same Word (page 70)
        • 3.3. Multiple Synonyms Rendered by More Than One Item (page 70)
        • 3.4. Relation to Translation Universals (page 74)
      • 4. Syntax (page 77)
        • 4.1. Phrase Level: Construct State Constructions in Hebrew (page 77)
        • 4.2. Clause Level (page 82)
          • 4.2.1. Word Order (page 82)
          • 4.2.2. Conjunctions (page 84)
          • 4.2.3. Prepositions (page 85)
        • 4.3. Simplification and Explicitation (page 86)
        • 4.4. Omissions (page 87)
        • 4.5. Additions (page 87)
        • 4.6. Relation to Translation Universals (page 88)
      • 5. Conclusions (page 88)
        • 5.1. Spelling (page 88)
        • 5.2. Synonyms (page 88)
        • 5.3. Syntax (page 89)
        • 5.4. Shorter Range of Government in Syriac (page 89)
        • 5.5. Creative Closeness to the Original (page 89)
        • 5.6. Relation to Translation Universals (page 89)
    • Chapter 4: Observations on the Mode of Translation in the Syrohexapla (page 91)
      • 1. Introduction (page 91)
      • 2. Balancing Between Vorlage, Translation and Transmission (page 92)
        • 2.1. Vorlage (page 92)
        • 2.2. Translation (page 93)
        • 2.3. Transmission (page 94)
      • 3. Examples (page 95)
        • 3.1. The Infinitives in 1 Sam 7:8 (page 95)
        • 3.2. Greek Loanwords (page 97)
        • 3.3. Transliterations (page 99)
        • 3.4. Proper Nouns (page 100)
      • 4. Conclusion (page 102)
    • Chapter 5:The Hwa Qatel and Hwa Qetil Constructions in the Peshitta Old Testament (page 103)
      • 1. Introduction (page 103)
      • 2. The Periphrastic Construction ??? + Predicate Participle in Biblical Hebrew (page 104)
        • 2.1. The periphrastic structure ( ??? [perfect] + predicate participleor predicate participle + ????? [perfect]) in the MT (page 105)
          • 2.1.1. In 23 cases, the Syriac translator rendered ??? (perfect) + predicate participlewith qatel hwa (page 105)
          • 2.1.2. In three cases ??? (perfect) + X + predicate participle is translated withqatel/qetil hwa (page 105)
          • 2.1.3. In four cases the Peshitta mirrors the Hebrew ??? (perfect) + predicateparticiple construction in Syriac (page 106)
          • 2.1.4. In two cases ??? (perfect) + X + predicate participle is translated with hwa +X + qatel/qetil (page 106)
          • 2.1.5. In four cases the Syriac translator rendered ??? + participle or a participle +??? with a suffixed verb form (page 106)
          • 2.1.6. In four cases a predicate participle + ??? is translated with qatel hwa (page 106)
          • 2.1.7. In ten cases where the Hebrew has a periphrastic construction the Peshitta diverges from the Hebrew text (page 107)
        • 2.2. The Hebrew construction ???? + predicate participle (page 107)
          • 2.2.1. There are fifteen cases where ???? + a predicate participle is translated withwahwa qatel (page 107)
          • 2.2.2. In thirteen cases ???? + X + a predicate participle is translated wahwa + X +qatel (page 108)
          • 2.2.3. On two occasions ???? (+ X) + a predicate participle is translated qatel hwa (page 110)
          • 2.2.4. On eleven occasions the Peshitta does not render ???? in the construction ????+ X + a predicate participle (page 110)
          • 2.2.5. In nine cases the Peshitta has a divergent reading for ???? + a predicate participle or ???? + X + a predicate participle (page 111)
        • 2.3 + predicate participle or ???? + X + predicate (page 113)
      • 3. The Periphrastic Construction Hwa Qatel in the Peshitta (page 114)
        • 3.1. hwa qatel Translates Hebrew weqatal (page 114)
        • 3.2. hwa qatel Translates a Hebrew yiqtol (page 115)
        • 3.3. hwa qetil Translates an Imperative (page 119)
        • 3.4. hwa qatel Translates a Periphrastic Imperative (page 119)
        • 3.5. The hwa qatel Translates an Infinitive Absolute that Functions as anImperative (page 119)
        • 3.6. hwa qatel Translates Hebrew yiqtol weqatal (page 119)
        • 3.7. The hwa qatel/qetil Appears in a Reading that Diverges from theHebrew (page 120)
        • 3.8. A wayyiqtol is Translated with hwa qatel or wahwa qatel (page 120)
        • 3.9. hwa qatel Translates Various Hebrew Constructions (page 121)
      • 4. Summary and Discussion (page 121)
      • 5. Conclusion (page 125)
    • Chapter 6: The Semantics of Syriac Motion Verbs in Exodus Chapters 1…19, Part II (page 127)
      • 1. Introduction (page 127)
      • 2. The Semantic Features of the Remaining Verbs of Motion (page 128)
        • 2.1. Detailed Classification of Verbs According to Semantic Features (page 129)
        • 2.2. Comments on Prepositions Used to Mark Oblique Objects (page 136)
      • 3. Comparison of Syriac Stem Types With Hebrew Stem Types (page 137)
      • 4. Conclusion (page 138)
    • Chapter 7: Lexicalizing the Syriac Preposition ??? ? (page 141)
      • 1. Introduction (page 141)
      • 2. Nature of Syriac Prepositions (page 142)
      • 3. Principles Governing Choice of Content Material (page 144)
        • 3.1. Syntactic Context Constrains Meaning (page 145)
        • 3.2. Syntax and Semantics are Predictably Related (page 145)
        • 3.3. Semantic Classes Streamline Contextual Information (page 146)
        • 3.4. The Need for Information on Valence Patterns (page 146)
      • 4. User-Friendliness (page 147)
        • 4.1. Type of Information (page 148)
        • 4.2. Presentation of Material (page 148)
      • 5. Proposal for Lexical Entries (page 148)
        • 5.1. Location of Information (page 148)
        • 5.2. Methodology (page 149)
          • 5.2.1. Criteria Examined (page 149)
          • 5.2.2. Assembly of Information (page 150)
          • 5.2.3. With Verbs (page 152)
          • 5.2.4. in Prepositional Phrases and Non-verbal Clauses (page 153)
      • 6. Greek Correspondences (page 154)
      • 7. Conclusion (page 156)
      • 8. Lexical Entry (page 156)
    • Bibliography (page 161)
    • Index (page 173)
      • Index of Biblical References (page 173)
      • Index of Authors (page 176)
      • Index of Subjects (page 178)
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