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Further Biblical Hebrew (paperback)


Explanations and Exercises


This coursebook is designed for students who have completed at least one year of college study in Biblical Hebrew. It helps students make the transition from the basic grammar books to use of the comprehensive reference grammars and to more advanced analysis of Biblical Hebrew. Constant reference is made to recent works of grammar, and also to the grammatical comments of the medieval Jewish exegetes. A central theme is that medieval and modern Biblical Hebrew scholars have reached essentially similar conclusions, even if the medievals lacked modern terminology.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-662-4
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Gorgias Handbooks 11
Publication Date: Jan 1,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 363
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-662-4
$117.00
$70.20

Further Biblical Hebrew is a coursebook designed for students who have completed at least one year of College study in Biblical Hebrew. It helps students make the transition from the basic grammar books to use of the comprehensive reference grammar books and to more advanced analysis of Biblical Hebrew. Constant reference is made not only to recent works of grammar, but also to the grammatical comments of the medieval Jewish exegetes in the original Hebrew, for which translations and explanations are provided. A central theme is the idea that medieval and modern scholars in the field of Biblical Hebrew grammar have reached essentially similar conclusions, even if the medievals lacked modern terminology.

Part One covers the Hebrew verb, focusing on the recognition and analysis of the uses of Niphal, Piel, Hiphil and Hithpael. There are exercises, such as: 'Spot the Niphal'; 'Identify the Piel verbs and discuss their form and use'; 'Identify and parse Polel formations'. All the analysis and all the exercises are based on actual Biblical verses and there is no use of artificial Hebrew.

Part Two treats the uses of Infinitive Absolute and Infinitive Construct; Part Three is devoted to Syntax, focusing on: antithetical sentences, purpose clauses, interrogative sentences, answers to questions and causal clauses. Part Four deals with uses of: Perfect, Imperfect and Participle. Part Five discusses the grammatical features of 'poetic' Biblical Hebrew and 'elevated style', including a grammatical overview of the Song of the Sea (Exodus 15).

Further Biblical Hebrew is a coursebook designed for students who have completed at least one year of College study in Biblical Hebrew. It helps students make the transition from the basic grammar books to use of the comprehensive reference grammar books and to more advanced analysis of Biblical Hebrew. Constant reference is made not only to recent works of grammar, but also to the grammatical comments of the medieval Jewish exegetes in the original Hebrew, for which translations and explanations are provided. A central theme is the idea that medieval and modern scholars in the field of Biblical Hebrew grammar have reached essentially similar conclusions, even if the medievals lacked modern terminology.

Part One covers the Hebrew verb, focusing on the recognition and analysis of the uses of Niphal, Piel, Hiphil and Hithpael. There are exercises, such as: 'Spot the Niphal'; 'Identify the Piel verbs and discuss their form and use'; 'Identify and parse Polel formations'. All the analysis and all the exercises are based on actual Biblical verses and there is no use of artificial Hebrew.

Part Two treats the uses of Infinitive Absolute and Infinitive Construct; Part Three is devoted to Syntax, focusing on: antithetical sentences, purpose clauses, interrogative sentences, answers to questions and causal clauses. Part Four deals with uses of: Perfect, Imperfect and Participle. Part Five discusses the grammatical features of 'poetic' Biblical Hebrew and 'elevated style', including a grammatical overview of the Song of the Sea (Exodus 15).

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Contributor Biography

Fiona Blumfield

Fiona Blumfield lectures in Biblical Hebrew at University College London. She holds an MA in Oriental Studies from the University of Cambridge and a PhD in Jewish Studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies, London University. She has been teaching and lecturing in Biblical Hebrew for over twenty five years in London.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Foreword (page 9)
  • Acknowledgments (page 11)
  • Abbreviations (page 13)
  • Part One: The Verb in Biblical Hebrew (page 15)
    • Niphal (page 15)
    • Spot the Niphal (page 15)
    • The relation between verbs lamed-'aleph and verbs lamed-hey (page 33)
    • The relation between verbs 'iin and 'ii' (page 41)
    • Uses of Niphal (page 43)
    • Views of medieval scholars on use of Niphal (page 52)
    • Piel (page 68)
    • Spot the Piel (page 68)
    • Uses of Piel (page 77)
    • Views of nedieval scholars on use of Piel (page 85)
    • Polel, Polal, Hithpolel (page 92)
    • Hiphil (page 101)
    • Try to recognize Hiphil verbs (page 101)
    • Uses of Hiphil (page 109)
    • Views of nedieval scholars on use of Hiphil (page 115)
    • Hithpael (page 126)
    • Spot the Hithpael (page 126)
    • Uses of Hithpael (page 131)
    • Exercise: identify the Hithpael verbs in the following biblical verses; discuss their form and use. (see explanatory notes at the end) (page 135)
    • Views on nedieval scholars on use of Hithpael (page 138)
    • The theory of the qal passive (page 148)
    • I: supposed perfects of Pual (page 149)
    • II: Apparent Hophal imperfects (page 152)
    • III: Apparent Pual participle forms without preformative mem (page 154)
    • IV: Views of nedieval scholars on the Qal Passive (page 155)
    • Glossary of rabbinic Hebrew grammatical terminology (page 157)
    • Brief biographical sketches of medieval scholars (page 158)
  • Part Two: The Infinitives in Biblical Hebrew (page 163)
    • Infinitive Absolute (page 163)
    • Infinitive Construct (page 187)
    • Exercise: identify the Infinitive Construct forms in the following biblical verses; discuss their form and use (page 189)
    • View of Medieval Scholars on the Form and Use of Infinitive Absolute and Infinitive Construct (page 206)
  • Part Three: Syntax (page 221)
    • final or purpose clauses (page 221)
    • The biblical origins of rabbinic Hebrew words for expressing purpose (page 231)
    • Exercise: translate the following English sentences into fully pointed biblical Hebrew (page 235)
    • Antithesis in Biblical Hebrew (page 237)
    • Study the following biblical verses and analyse the various methods used to express antithesis and/ or contrast; explanatory notes are provided with each verse (page 237)
    • Exercise: translate the following English sentences into fully pointed biblical Hebrew (page 246)
    • Causal and Explicative clauses (page 248)
    • Exercise: study the following biblical verses and discuss/analyxe the various methods of formulating causal and explicative clauses in biblical Hebrew. See explanatory notes at the end of teh exercise (page 248)
    • Exercise: translate the following English sentences into fully pointed biblical Hebrew (page 257)
    • Questions and answers in biblical hebrew (page 259)
    • Exercise: spot the 'hey interrogative' in teh following biblical verses adn deduce the rules for the pointing of the 'hey interrogative'; explanatory notes are found at the end (page 259)
    • Study the following biblical verses and discuss the formation of interrogative sentences in biblical Hebrew (page 264)
    • Study the following biblical verses and consider how answers to questions are formulated in biblical Hebrew (page 268)
    • Exercise: translate the following English sentences into fully pointed biblical Hebrew; suggested translations will be found at the end (page 273)
  • Part Four: Use of Tenses in Biblical Hebrew (page 275)
    • Use of Perfect/Qatal (page 276)
    • Exercise: in the following biblical verses, discuss/analyse uses of the Perfect/Qatal (page 276)
    • Use of Imperfect/Yiqtol (page 284)
    • Exercise: in the following biblical verses discuss/analyxe use of Imperfect/Yiqtol (page 284)
    • Views of medieval scholars on use of perfect and imperfect (page 296)
    • The use of participles in biblical hebrew (page 310)
    • Exercise: identify teh participle forms in the following biblical verses and discuss their use and function; explanatory notes are added (page 311)
    • The form and use of the jussive in biblical hebrew (page 314)
    • Exercise: identify the Jussive in the following biblical verses and analyse/discuss its function; explanatory notes are added (page 315)
  • Part Five: Poetic Hebrew/Elevated Style (page 319)
    • Introductory remarks (page 319)
    • A Summary outline of teh grammatical features of 'elevated style' (page 320)
    • Energic Nun and Unassimilated Engergic Nun (see GK 58 i,k,l; WHG pp 130-133) (page 322)
    • Exercise: in the following biblical verses, identify teh verbal suffixes with Energic Nun, both contracted and uncontracted.; explanatory notes are found at the end (page 323)
    • Rare forms of pronominal suffixes of the verb and noun (page 325)
    • Exercise; in the following biblical verses, identify teh rare forms om, om, om, of the pronominal suffixes of teh verb (with teh perf. imperf. and imperat); explanatory notes and added (page 326)
    • Exercise; in the following biblical verses, identify the rare forms om, om, om of the pronominal suffixes with the noun (page 329)
    • Explanatory notes are added (page 329)
    • Hireq compaginis (page 331)
    • Exercise: in the following biblical verses, spot teh Hireq Compaginis in nouns, adjectives adn participles. Note also the instances where a preposition is inserted between teh cstr. state and its genitive; explanatory notes are added (page 332)
    • Paragogic nun (page 336)
    • Exercise: study the occurrence of paragogic Nun in the following biblical verses, noting its occurrence with and without the pause, in both prose and poetic texts; explanatory notes are added (page 336)
    • A grammatical overview of the song of the sea (page 339)
  • Bibliography (page 357)
  • Index (page 361)
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