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The God of Thunder and War in Micah, Habakkuk, and Zechariah


This volume explores storm-/warrior-god motif as found in non-biblical ANE texts, followed by an analysis of the language and imagery in several noteworthy theophanic passages in the Hebrew Bible. These characteristics and vocabulary are used in later chapters to identify and analyze similar motifs in the Twelve Prophets, especially focusing on Mic 7:7-20; Habakkuk 3; and Zech 9:9-16 as test cases. By tracing the use of the storm-/warrior-god motif and language associated with it, a detectable shift is apparent in the use of the motif in the HB that corresponds with the development of monotheism within Ancient Israelite religion.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0611-6
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Aug 8,2018
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 212
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0611-6
$95.00
$57.00

This volume explores storm-/warrior-god motif as found in non-biblical ANE texts, followed by an analysis of the language and imagery in several noteworthy theophanic passages in the Hebrew Bible. These characteristics and vocabulary are used in later chapters to identify and analyze similar motifs in the Twelve Prophets, especially focusing on Mic 7:7-20; Habakkuk 3; and Zech 9:9-16 as test cases. By tracing the use of the storm-/warrior-god motif and language associated with it, a detectable shift is apparent in the use of the motif in the HB that corresponds with the development of monotheism within Ancient Israelite religion.

This volume explores storm-/warrior-god motif as found in non-biblical ANE texts, followed by an analysis of the language and imagery in several noteworthy theophanic passages in the Hebrew Bible. These characteristics and vocabulary are used in later chapters to identify and analyze similar motifs in the Twelve Prophets, especially focusing on Mic 7:7-20; Habakkuk 3; and Zech 9:9-16 as test cases. By tracing the use of the storm-/warrior-god motif and language associated with it, a detectable shift is apparent in the use of the motif in the HB that corresponds with the development of monotheism within Ancient Israelite religion.

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Contributor Biography

Jamie Banister

Jamie A. Banister earned a Ph.D. in Biblical Studies from The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. She has taught courses in biblical studies, world religions, and New Testament Greek. Other publications include articles in the Journal of Biblical Literature and Biblica.

Table of Contents (v)
Acknowledgments (ix)
Abbreviations (xi)
Chapter One: Storm-god and Warrior-god Motifs (1)
   1. Storm-/Warrior-god Motifs in Ancient Near Eastern Texts (3)
      1.1. Atmospheric and Natural Elements as Weapons (3)
      1.2. Mythic Battles (5)
      1.3. Effects on Nature (6)
      1.4. Smiting Enemies (7)
      1.5. Storm- and/or Warrior-gods and Mountains (7)
   2. Storm-/Warrior-god Motifs in the Hebrew Bible (8)
      2.1. Sinai Theophanies and Moses (12)
      2.2. Exodus 15: ‘Song of Moses’ / ‘Song of the Sea’ (15)
      2.3. Deuteronomy 32: ‘Song of Moses’ (16)
      2.4. Deuteronomy 33: ‘Moses’ Final Blessing’ (16)
      2.5. Judges 5: ‘Song of Deborah’ (17)
      2.6. 1 Samuel 2: ‘Song / Prayer of Hannah’ (18)
      2.7. Psalm 18 (// 2 Samuel 22) (18)
      2.8. Psalm 68 (20)
      2.9. Psalm 77 (21)
      2.10. Isaiah (22)
      2.11. A Counter-image: Mt. Horeb and Elijah (1 Kings 19:9–18) (22)
   3. Conclusion (23)
Chapter Two: Micah 7:7–20 (27)
   1. Text, Syntax, and Translation (29)
   2. Authenticity and Dating (39)
   3. Storm-/Warrior-god Theophanic Motifs and Vocabulary (41)
      3.1. Effects upon Nature (42)
      3.2. Effects upon Humans (42)
      3.3. God’s Anger/Wrath (43)
      3.4. God as Savior, Rock, etc. (43)
      3.5. Place Names (44)
   4. Micah 7 and Monotheism (44)
   5. Summary (46)
Chapter Three: Habakkuk 3:1–19 (47)
   1. Text, Syntax, and Translation (48)
   2. Authenticity and Dating (78)
   3. Storm-/Warrior-god Theophanic Motifs and Vocabulary (85)
      3.1. Effects upon Nature (87)
      3.2. Effects upon Humans (89)
      3.3. God’s Anger/Wrath (90)
      4.4. God’s Weapons/Battle Motifs (90)
      3.5. God as Savior, Rock, etc. (92)
      3.6. Place Names (92)
   4. Habakkuk 3 and Monotheism (93)
   5. Summary (94)
Chapter Four: Zechariah 9:9–16 (97)
   1. Text, Syntax, and Translation (101)
   2. Authenticity and Dating (109)
   3. Storm-/Warrior-god Theophanic Motifs and Vocabulary (118)
      3.1. Effects upon Nature (120)
      3.2. Effects upon Humans (120)
      3.3. God’s Anger / Wrath (121)
      3.4. God’s Weapons / Battle Motifs (121)
      3.5. God as Savior, Rock, etc. (124)
      3.6. Place Names (127)
   4. Zechariah 9 and Monotheism (128)
   5. Summary (128)
Chapter Five: Conclusion (131)
   1. Intertextuality and Inner-Biblical Allusions (131)
   2. Cross-analysis of Mic 7:7–20, Habakkuk 3, and Zech 9:9–16 (135)
      2.1. Quotations and Non-Theophanic Linguistic Similarities (136)
      2.2. The Storm-/warrior-god Motif (139)
   3. Connections with the Development of Monotheism (146)
   4. Summary of Findings (147)
Appendix A: Theophanic Vocabulary (Nouns and Verbs) (153)
Appendix B: Theophanic Vocabulary (by Thematic Categories) (159)
Bibliography (165)

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