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Hugoye: Journal of Syriac Studies (Volume 1)


1998 [2010]


Edited by George Anton Kiraz
Widely regarded as a premier journal dedicated to the study of Syriac, Hugoye: Journal of Syriac Studies was established in 1998 as a venue devoted exclusively to the discipline. An organ of Beth Mardutho, the Syriac Institute, the journal appears semi-annually and will be printed in annual editions. A peer-reviewed journal, Hugoye is a respected academic source for up-to-date information about the state of Syriac studies and for discovering what is going on in the field. Contributors include some of the most respected names in the world of Syriac today. This is Volume 1 of the journal from 1998.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-810-7
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jan 1,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 319
Languages: English, Syriac
ISBN: 978-1-59333-810-7
$107.00
$64.20

Widely regarded as a premier journal dedicated to the study of Syriac, Hugoye: Journal of Syriac Studies was established in 1998 as a venue devoted exclusively to the discipline. An organ of Beth Mardutho, the Syriac Institute, the journal appears semi-annually and will be printed in annual editions. A peer-reviewed journal, Hugoye is a respected academic source for up-to-date information about the state of Syriac studies and for discovering what is going on in the field. Contributors include some of the most respected names in the world of Syriac today.

Volume 1 includes the following articles: “The Baptismal Anointings According to the Anonymous Expositio Officiorum” by Sebastian Brock; “Ms Vat. Syr. 268 and the Revisional Development of the Harklean Margin” by Andreas Juckel; “A Bibliographical Clavis to the Works of Jacob of Edessa” by Dirk Kruisheer and Lucas van Rompay; “An Epiphany of Mystical Symbols: Jacob of Sarug’s Mêmrâ 109 on Abraham and His Types” by Richard E. McCarron; “A Single Human Being Divided in Himself: Ephraim the Syrian, the Man in the Middle” by Andrew Palmer; “The Tears of the Sinful Woman: a Theology of Redemption in the Homilies of St. Ephraim and his Followers” by Hannah Hunt; “St. Ephraim’s Influence on the Greeks” by David G. K. Taylor; “A Spiritual Father for the Whole Church: the Universal Appeal of St. Ephraem the Syrian” by Sidney H. Griffith; “Ephrem in Christian Palestinian Aramaic” by Alain Desreumaux; “St. Ephrem the Syrian’s Thought and Imagery as an Inspiration to Byzantine Artists” by Zaga Gavrilovic; “Ephraim the Syrian in Anglo-Saxon England” by Jane Stevenson; and “John Wesley and Ephraem Syrus” by Gordon Wakefield.

Widely regarded as a premier journal dedicated to the study of Syriac, Hugoye: Journal of Syriac Studies was established in 1998 as a venue devoted exclusively to the discipline. An organ of Beth Mardutho, the Syriac Institute, the journal appears semi-annually and will be printed in annual editions. A peer-reviewed journal, Hugoye is a respected academic source for up-to-date information about the state of Syriac studies and for discovering what is going on in the field. Contributors include some of the most respected names in the world of Syriac today.

Volume 1 includes the following articles: “The Baptismal Anointings According to the Anonymous Expositio Officiorum” by Sebastian Brock; “Ms Vat. Syr. 268 and the Revisional Development of the Harklean Margin” by Andreas Juckel; “A Bibliographical Clavis to the Works of Jacob of Edessa” by Dirk Kruisheer and Lucas van Rompay; “An Epiphany of Mystical Symbols: Jacob of Sarug’s Mêmrâ 109 on Abraham and His Types” by Richard E. McCarron; “A Single Human Being Divided in Himself: Ephraim the Syrian, the Man in the Middle” by Andrew Palmer; “The Tears of the Sinful Woman: a Theology of Redemption in the Homilies of St. Ephraim and his Followers” by Hannah Hunt; “St. Ephraim’s Influence on the Greeks” by David G. K. Taylor; “A Spiritual Father for the Whole Church: the Universal Appeal of St. Ephraem the Syrian” by Sidney H. Griffith; “Ephrem in Christian Palestinian Aramaic” by Alain Desreumaux; “St. Ephrem the Syrian’s Thought and Imagery as an Inspiration to Byzantine Artists” by Zaga Gavrilovic; “Ephraim the Syrian in Anglo-Saxon England” by Jane Stevenson; and “John Wesley and Ephraem Syrus” by Gordon Wakefield.

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Contributor Biography

George Kiraz

George A. Kiraz is the founder and director of Beth Mardutho: The Syriac Institute, and the president of Gorgias Press. He earned an MSt in Syriac Studies from Oxford University, and an MPhil and PhD from Cambridge University. He has an extensive list of publications in Syriac studies.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Letter from the General Editor (page 9)
  • The Baptismal Anointings According to the Anonymous Expositio Officiorum (page 11)
  • Introduction (page 11)
  • [End of chapter 4; p. 104] (page 15)
  • (The horn of oil represents the Holy Spirit) (page 15)
    • Chapter 5 (page 16)
    • Discussion (page 21)
    • Introduction† (page 25)
    • The Harklean Apparatus (page 27)
    • The Revisional Development Towards the Byzantine Text (page 28)
    • Limitations (page 30)
    • Lists of Readings (page 31)
      • List A (page 31)
      • List B (page 33)
      • List C (page 35)
    • Preface (page 41)
    • Abbreviations (page 42)
    • A. Sections in introductory works and handbooks (page 43)
    • B. Articles in dictionaries and encyclopedias (page 44)
    • C. General works and articles (page 44)
    • D. Life of Jacob — Chronological questions (page 45)
    • E. References (page 45)
    • A. Revision of the biblical text (page 45)
      • Editions and translations (page 45)
      • Studies (page 46)
      • References (page 47)
    • B. Scholia and commentary on the Bible (page 47)
      • Editions and translations (page 47)
      • Studies (page 47)
      • References (page 47)
    • C. Hexaemeron (page 48)
      • Editions and translations (page 48)
      • Studies (page 48)
      • References (page 48)
    • D. Philosophical works (including the translation of the Categories) (page 49)
      • Editions and translations (page 49)
      • Studies (page 49)
      • References (page 49)
    • E. Chronicon (page 50)
      • Editions and translations (page 50)
      • Studies (page 50)
      • References (page 50)
    • F. Liturgical works (including Martyrology) (page 51)
      • Editions and translations (page 51)
      • Studies (page 52)
      • References (page 52)
    • G. Canones (page 52)
      • Editions and translations (page 52)
      • Studies (page 53)
      • References (page 53)
    • H. Grammatical work, “Massora” (including the “Treatise on points ”), Syriac orthography (page 53)
      • Editions and translations (page 53)
      • Studies (page 54)
      • References (page 54)
    • I. Letters (page 55)
      • Editions and translations (page 55)
      • Studies (page 55)
      • References (page 56)
    • J. Translations by Jacob (page 56)
      • Editions and translations (page 56)
      • Studies (page 57)
      • References (page 57)
    • K. Various scholia and varia (page 58)
      • Editions and translations (page 58)
      • References (page 58)
    • A. Catena Severi (page 59)
    • B. Isho?dad of Merv (page 59)
    • C. Moses bar Kepa (page 59)
    • D. Dionysius bar Salibi (page 59)
    • E. Barhebraeus (page 60)
    • F. Jacob in later Syriac chronicles (page 60)
    • G. Jacob in the canonical tradition (page 60)
    • H. Jacob’s Masoretic Work in the later tradition (see II.H) (page 60)
    • A. Armenian (page 61)
    • B. Arabic (page 61)
    • A. Jacob’s quotations of the New Testament (page 61)
    • B. Jacob and apocryphal literature (page 61)
    • Introduction (page 63)
    • The Text (page 65)
      • Exordium (page 70)
      • Section 1 (page 70)
      • Section 2–5 (page 71)
      • Section 6 (page 72)
      • Section 7–12 (page 73)
      • Section 13 (page 73)
      • Section 14 (page 74)
      • Section 15–17 (page 74)
      • Section 17–19 (page 74)
      • Section 20 (page 75)
      • Section 21–27 (page 75)
      • Section 27–28 (page 76)
      • Section 29 (page 77)
      • Section 30 (page 77)
    • The Mystical Symbols (page 77)
    • Conclusion (page 83)
      • Syrian-Netherlands Cooperation for the Study of Art in Syria (SYNCAS) (page 92)
      • Egyptian-Netherlands Cooperation for Coptic Art Preservation (ENCCAP) (page 93)
      • Appendix (page 120)
    • SPECIAL ISSUE: (page 121)
    • The Influence of Saint Ephraim the Syrian – I (page 121)
    • References (page 166)
    • Introduction (page 171)
    • Ephraim’s Life and Poetic Idiom (page 172)
    • Typology and Symbolism9 (page 174)
    • Conflations and Typology of Womanhood (page 175)
    • Grieving Penitence and the Sinful Woman (page 178)
    • Inner Dialogue and Personification (page 179)
    • Anointing as Prefiguring Christ’s Saving Death (page 180)
    • The Transformation Effected by Healing (page 181)
    • The Eye of Faith (page 184)
    • Healing as Demonstrative of the Incarnation (page 185)
    • References (page 189)
    • I (page 203)
    • II (page 205)
    • III (page 207)
    • IV (page 210)
    • V (page 213)
    • VI (page 215)
    • VII (page 217)
    • VIII (page 220)
    • IX (page 225)
    • Ephraim Mimro de Poenitencia (page 228)
    • Two Mimre Attributed to Ephraim (page 230)
    • (page 230)
    • Appendix I: (page 231)
      • Catalogue: (page 231)
      • Dimensions: (page 231)
    • Appendix II: (page 232)
      • Dimensions: (page 232)
    • List of Illustrations (page 247)
    • Laterculus (page 267)
    • Other Evidence for Ephraim in Anglo-Saxon England (page 272)
    • References (page 292)
    • 1. Introduction (page 294)
    • 2. Stratigraphy of the Layers of Plaster (page 296)
    • 3. Wall-Paintings Uncovered (page 297)
      • 3.1. Decorative Lower Zone (page 297)
      • 3.2. The Three Patriarchs (Fig. 1) (page 298)
      • 3.3. The Virgin Galaktotrophousa (page 300)
      • 3.4. Unidentified Military Saint (Fig. 2) (page 301)
      • 3.5. Paintings on the Upper Walls of the Khurus (page 303)
      • 3.6. Other Paintings in the Khurus (page 307)
      • 3.7. St. Dioscorus (page 307)
      • 3.8. The Palimpsest Wall (Fig. 5) (page 308)
      • 3.9. Various Test Patches (page 308)
      • 3.10. Paintings in the Haikal (Sanctuary) (page 310)
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