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The Rhetoric of Divine Kingship in the Book of Ezekiel


This book examines various rhetorical ways in which the motif of Yahweh’s Kingship functions in the Book of Ezekiel and explores what these arguments contribute to our understanding of the prophetic book as a whole.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0286-6
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Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Aug 28,2014
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 343
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0286-6
$95.00
$57.00

This book examines various rhetorical ways in which the motif of Yahweh’s Kingship functions in the Book of Ezekiel and explores what these arguments contribute to our understanding of the prophetic book as a whole. It concludes that the chief purpose for such rhetoric is to bolster and/or rebuild Yahweh’s reputation among the Judean exiles in Babylon in order to encourage them to avoid assimilation and to preserve their unique faith and identity as the People of Israel.


The book provides an overview of the rhetoric of the larger Ezekiel corpus, an examination of the historical and ideological context of the Babylonian exile, a discussion of the method of rhetorical analysis employed here, and a detailed exegesis of texts in which the motif of Yahweh’s kingship is most prominent. In relation to this central motif, relevant sub-themes such as paradise and the underworld, divine presence and absence, and the exodus are also explored.


Dr. Terry Ray Clark (PhD, Biblical Interpretation, University of Denver and the Iliff School of Theology) is an Associate Professor of Religion at Georgetown College (KY), where he teaches courses in Old Testament, World Religions, and Religion and Culture. He has published numerous articles and essays on the Bible and Popular Culture, and is co-editor of Understanding Religion and Popular Culture (Routledge, 2012).

This book examines various rhetorical ways in which the motif of Yahweh’s Kingship functions in the Book of Ezekiel and explores what these arguments contribute to our understanding of the prophetic book as a whole. It concludes that the chief purpose for such rhetoric is to bolster and/or rebuild Yahweh’s reputation among the Judean exiles in Babylon in order to encourage them to avoid assimilation and to preserve their unique faith and identity as the People of Israel.


The book provides an overview of the rhetoric of the larger Ezekiel corpus, an examination of the historical and ideological context of the Babylonian exile, a discussion of the method of rhetorical analysis employed here, and a detailed exegesis of texts in which the motif of Yahweh’s kingship is most prominent. In relation to this central motif, relevant sub-themes such as paradise and the underworld, divine presence and absence, and the exodus are also explored.


Dr. Terry Ray Clark (PhD, Biblical Interpretation, University of Denver and the Iliff School of Theology) is an Associate Professor of Religion at Georgetown College (KY), where he teaches courses in Old Testament, World Religions, and Religion and Culture. He has published numerous articles and essays on the Bible and Popular Culture, and is co-editor of Understanding Religion and Popular Culture (Routledge, 2012).

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Contributor Biography

Terry R. Clark

Terry Ray Clark is currently an Associate Professor of Religion at Georgetown College (KY). He holds the Joint Ph.D. in Religious Studies from the Iliff School of Theology and the University of Denver (Biblical Interpretation). His research and writing focus upon the fields of Hebrew Scripture and Bible and Popular Culture.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Acknowledgments (page 9)
  • Abbreviations (page 11)
  • Chapter One: Introduction (page 15)
    • The Book of Ezekiel and Rhetorical Analysis (page 20)
    • Prior Rhetorical Analyses of Ezekiel (page 21)
    • The Scope of This Study (page 26)
    • The Method of Rhetorical Analysis (page 32)
  • Chapter Two: Rhetorical Arrangement, Genre, and Purpose (page 39)
    • The Visions of 1-3, 8-11, 40-48 (page 42)
    • Exekiel 1…24, 25…32, 33, and 34…48 (page 44)
      • Chapters 1-24 (page 46)
      • Chapters 25-32 (page 53)
      • Chapters 33-48 (page 60)
    • The Overall Purpose of the Book of Ezekiel (page 64)
    • Conclusion (page 68)
  • Chapter Three: Historical, Ideological, and Rhetorical Context (page 71)
    • Rhetorical Situation of the Book of Exekiel (page 75)
    • Divine Kingship in Israel (page 77)
    • The Historical and Ideological Context of Ezekiel (page 79)
    • Divine Kingship and the Rhetorical Situation of Ezekiel (page 93)
    • The Exile as Ideological Crisis (page 96)
    • A Closer Look at Ezekiel's Intended Audience (page 107)
  • Chapter Four: Rhetoric of Divine Presence and Absence (page 115)
    • Ezekiel 1:4-3:15 Yahweh's Initial Appearance to the Priest Ezekiel (page 115)
      • Rhetorical Unit, Arrangement, and Genre (page 115)
      • Rhetorical Situation of Ezekiel 1:4-3:15 (page 121)
      • Rhetorical Strategies: Logos/Ethos/Pathos (page 123)
      • Rhetorical Synthesis (page 130)
    • Ezekiel 8-11: Yahweh Departs from the Jerusalem Temple (page 134)
      • Rhetorical Unit, Arrangement, and Genre (page 134)
      • Rhetorical Situation of Ezekiel 8-11 (page 138)
      • Rhetorical Strategies: Logos/Ethos/Pathos (page 139)
      • Rhetorical Synthesis (page 142)
    • Ezekiel 40-48 (40:1-43:1-12): Yahweh Returns to Dwell in the Promised Land (page 143)
      • Rhetorical Unit, Arrangement, and Genre (page 143)
      • Rhetorical Situation of Ezekiel 40-48 (page 148)
      • Rhetorical Strategies: Logos/Ethos/Pathos (page 149)
      • Rhetorical Synthesis (page 152)
  • Chapter Five: Rhetoric of the Exodus and Yahweh's Reputation (page 159)
    • The Exodus Traditions and Israelite Identity (page 161)
    • The Exodus and Yahweh's Reputation (Ezek 20:1-44) (page 164)
      • Rhetorical Unit, Translation, Arrangement, and Genre (page 164)
      • Rhetorical Situation (page 178)
      • Rhetorical Strategies: Logos/Ethos/Pathos (page 181)
      • Rhetorical Synthesis (page 205)
  • Chapter Six: Phetoric of Paradise and the Underworld (page 207)
    • Ezekiel's Oracles Against the Nations (page 210)
    • Paradise Lost by the King of Tyre (Ezek 28:11-19) (page 215)
      • Rhetorical Unit, Translation, Arrangement, and Genre (page 215)
      • Rhetorical Situation (page 224)
      • Rhetorical Strategies: Logos/Ethos/Pathos (page 229)
      • Rhetorical Synthesis (page 237)
    • Paradise Lost by the King of Egypt (Ezek 31:1-18) (page 238)
      • Rhetorical Unit, Translation, Arrangement, and Genre (page 238)
      • Rhetorical Situation (page 247)
      • Rhetorical Strategies: Logos/Ethos/Pathos (page 247)
      • Rhetorical Synthesis (page 252)
      • The Rhetoric of Paradise in Ezekiel 36 and 47 (page 254)
    • Conclusion (page 257)
  • Chapter Seven: Rhetoric of Yahweh as Shepherd (page 259)
    • The Shepherd Kingship of Yahweh (Ezek 34:1-31) (page 260)
      • Rhetorical Unit, Translation, Arrangement, and Genre (page 260)
      • Rhetorical Situation (page 278)
      • Rhetorical Strategies: Logos/Ethos/Pathos (page 283)
      • Rhetorical Synthesis (page 299)
  • Chapter Eight: Conclusion (page 303)
  • Bibliography (page 305)
  • Index (page 323)
    • Biblical References (page 323)
    • Subjects (page 336)
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