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This volume introduces the letters of the Syriac alphabet a few at the time, and each set of letters is accompanied by guides to pronunciation and the correct way to write the letters, including helpful charts and illustrations. Practice exercises at the end of each section provide the user with copious opportunities for review to facilitate rapid acquisition. This volume will be helpful to all who want to learn the basics of Syriac pronunciation and orthography without being inundated with technical linguistic jargon. The volume is an extract of Chapter 1 of Kiraz’s The New Syriac Primer.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0085-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Aug 1,2011
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 56
Languages: English, Syriac
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0085-5
$31.00

Many grammars of the Syriac language focus on reading and translation, completely omitting issues of correct pronunciation and orthography. In contrast, George Kiraz’s approach to learning Syriac is founded upon the commitment to preserving Syriac as a spoken language. Written in a style designed for beginners, Kiraz avoids technical language and strives for reader-friendly, inductive approach. This volume introduces the letters of the Syriac alphabet a few at the time, and each set of letters is accompanied guides to pronunciation and the correct way to write the letters, including helpful charts and illustrations. Practice exercises at the end of each section provide the user with copious opportunities for review in order to facilitate rapid acquisition. This volume will be helpful to all who want to learn the basics of Syriac pronunciation and orthography without being inundated with technical linguistic jargon. The volume is an extract of Chapter 1 of Kiraz’s The New Syriac Primer.

Many grammars of the Syriac language focus on reading and translation, completely omitting issues of correct pronunciation and orthography. In contrast, George Kiraz’s approach to learning Syriac is founded upon the commitment to preserving Syriac as a spoken language. Written in a style designed for beginners, Kiraz avoids technical language and strives for reader-friendly, inductive approach. This volume introduces the letters of the Syriac alphabet a few at the time, and each set of letters is accompanied guides to pronunciation and the correct way to write the letters, including helpful charts and illustrations. Practice exercises at the end of each section provide the user with copious opportunities for review in order to facilitate rapid acquisition. This volume will be helpful to all who want to learn the basics of Syriac pronunciation and orthography without being inundated with technical linguistic jargon. The volume is an extract of Chapter 1 of Kiraz’s The New Syriac Primer.

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ContributorBiography

George Kiraz

George A. Kiraz is the founder and director of Beth Mardutho: The Syriac Institute, the Editor-in-Chief of Gorgias Press, and a Senior Research Associate at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. He earned an M.St. degree in Syriac Studies from the University of Oxford (1991) and an M.Phil. and a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge (1992, 1996). He has published extensively in the fields of computational linguistics, Syriac studies, and the digital humanities. His latest books include The Syriac Orthodox in North America (1895–1995): A Short History (2019) and Syriac-English New Testament (2020).

George is an ordained Deacon of the rank of Ewangeloyo (Gospler) in the Syriac Orthodox Church where he also serves on several Patriarchal, Synodal, and local committees. He lives in Piscataway, NJ, with his wife Christine and their children, Tabetha Gabriella, Sebastian Kenoro, and Lucian Nurono.

  • Preface (page 5)
  • 1.1 Olaph, Béth, Gomal, and Dolath (page 6)
  • 1.2 Hé, Waw, and Zayn (page 13)
  • 1.3 ?éth, ?éth, and Yudh (page 18)
  • 1.4 Koph, Lomadh, Mim, and Nun (page 26)
  • 1.5 The Letters (page 33)
  • 1.6 Simkath, ?é, Phé, and ?odhé (page 36)
  • 1.7 Qoph, Rish, Shin, and Taw (page 43)
  • 1.8 Review of the Alphabet (page 49)
  • 1.9 I Dont Need Those Vowels, Do I? (page 53)
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