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Introduction to the Grammar of Hebrew Poetry in Byzantine Palestine


This book investigates the interaction between grammatical norms and poetic technique on the basis of a corpus selected from the oeuvre of the payyetan Eleazar be-rabbi Qillir. As a basis for this investigation, a descriptive/comparative analysis of the Qillirian dialect is offered. The first portion of the work is a grammar devoted mainly to morphology and syntax. The second portion of the work is an investigation of the poetic norms, as well as rhetorical techniques employed by Qillir, together with an assessment of their impact on the grammar. The overall aim of the project is to design an analytical framework within which a self-conscious poetic dialect might be investigated.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0402-0
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Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jun 30,2014
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 559
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0402-0
$61.06
$36.64

This work is concerned with investigating a corpus of several thousand lines of poetry, selected from the oeuvre of Eleazar be-rabbi Qillir, a liturgical poet (payyetan) whose period of activity dates to the early seventh century CE. The first portion of the work is a grammar devoted mainly to morphology and syntax. The aim of this portion is (1) to provide a structural description of the most salient/individuating features of the Qillirian dialect, and (2) to compare the morphological and syntactic data thus gathered with analogous phenomena in Biblical, Dead Sea Scrolls, and Mishnaic Hebrew, thereby establishing the position of the Qillirian dialect within the developmental trajectory of Hebrew in Roman/Byzantine Palestine. The second portion of the work is an investigation of the poetic norms, as well as rhetorical techniques employed by Qillir, together with an assessment of their impact on the grammar (e.g., the influence of rhyme on morphology). This portion seeks to integrate a formal analysis of Qillirian poetics into a linguistic evaluation of the Qillirian dialect vis-à-vis its Palestinian contemporaries (including Aramaic and Greek) and antecedents. The overall aim of the project is to design an analytical framework within which a self-conscious poetic dialect might be investigated, both as a linguistic and an aesthetic object.

Michael Rand is a graduate of the Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University (2003). He has worked for the Historical Hebrew Dictionary Project of the Academy of the Hebrew Language (2007-2013), and currently holds the position of Lecturer in Hebrew and Aramaic at the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies of the University of Cambridge. His main field of expertise is Classical Hebrew piyyut, together with the manuscripts of the Cairo Genizah in which it is copied. Within a wider perspective, he is especially interested in the evolution of Hebrew poetry, both as a self-contained literary/linguistic phenomenon, as well as in its interaction with other Semitic traditions (e.g., Aramaic, Arabic).

Cover: Or. 1080 13.56 (recto). This manuscript contains the beginning of Qillir’s qedushta את חיל יום פקודה for Rosh Ha-Shana.

This work is concerned with investigating a corpus of several thousand lines of poetry, selected from the oeuvre of Eleazar be-rabbi Qillir, a liturgical poet (payyetan) whose period of activity dates to the early seventh century CE. The first portion of the work is a grammar devoted mainly to morphology and syntax. The aim of this portion is (1) to provide a structural description of the most salient/individuating features of the Qillirian dialect, and (2) to compare the morphological and syntactic data thus gathered with analogous phenomena in Biblical, Dead Sea Scrolls, and Mishnaic Hebrew, thereby establishing the position of the Qillirian dialect within the developmental trajectory of Hebrew in Roman/Byzantine Palestine. The second portion of the work is an investigation of the poetic norms, as well as rhetorical techniques employed by Qillir, together with an assessment of their impact on the grammar (e.g., the influence of rhyme on morphology). This portion seeks to integrate a formal analysis of Qillirian poetics into a linguistic evaluation of the Qillirian dialect vis-à-vis its Palestinian contemporaries (including Aramaic and Greek) and antecedents. The overall aim of the project is to design an analytical framework within which a self-conscious poetic dialect might be investigated, both as a linguistic and an aesthetic object.

Michael Rand is a graduate of the Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University (2003). He has worked for the Historical Hebrew Dictionary Project of the Academy of the Hebrew Language (2007-2013), and currently holds the position of Lecturer in Hebrew and Aramaic at the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies of the University of Cambridge. His main field of expertise is Classical Hebrew piyyut, together with the manuscripts of the Cairo Genizah in which it is copied. Within a wider perspective, he is especially interested in the evolution of Hebrew poetry, both as a self-contained literary/linguistic phenomenon, as well as in its interaction with other Semitic traditions (e.g., Aramaic, Arabic).

Cover: Or. 1080 13.56 (recto). This manuscript contains the beginning of Qillir’s qedushta את חיל יום פקודה for Rosh Ha-Shana.

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Contributor Biography

Michael Rand

Michael Rand is a graduate of the Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University (2003). He has worked for the Historical Hebrew Dictionary Project of the Academy of the Hebrew Language (2007-2013), and currently holds the position of Lecturer in Hebrew and Aramaic at the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies of the University of Cambridge. His main field of expertise is Classical Hebrew piyyut, together with the manuscripts of the Cairo Genizah in which it is copied. Within a wider perspective, he is especially interested in the evolution of Hebrew poetry, both as a self-contained literary/linguistic phenomenon, as well as in its interaction with other Semitic traditions (e.g., Aramaic, Arabic).

  • Contents (page 5)
  • Preface (page 16)
  • Works Cited by Abbreviation (page 19)
  • Sigla (page 21)
  • Introduction (page 23)
    • 1. General Considerations (page 23)
    • 2. The Corpus (page 39)
  • Chapter 1- Phonology (page 47)
    • 3. Phonological Phenomena in the Consonantal Orthography (page 47)
    • 4. Consonantal Equivalencies (page 49)
    • 5. Vocalic Equivalencies (page 50)
  • Chapter 2- Morphology (page 53)
    • 6. Suffixed Genitive Pronouns (page 53)
    • 7. Suffixed Accusative Pronouns (page 59)
    • 8. Nominal Morphology (page 65)
    • 9. Nominal Morphology of the Weak Roots (page 87)
    • 10. Construct = Absolute (page 122)
    • 11. Verbal Morphology (page 122)
    • 12. Verbal Morphology of the Weak Roots (page 133)
    • 13. Stem Usage (page 183)
  • Chapter 3- Syntax (page 265)
    • 14. Nominal Syntax (page 265)
    • 15. Monographic and Monosyllabic/Polysyllabic Prepositions (page 300)
    • 16. BH Nouns Functioning as Prepositions (page 335)
    • 17. Complex Prepositions (page 338)
    • 18. Verbal Syntax (page 342)
    • 19. Infinitive (page 364)
    • 20. Gerund (page 384)
    • 21. Non-Predicate Participle (page 388)
    • 22. Adverbs (page 391)
    • 23. Other Particles (page 420)
    • 24. Emphatic Repetition (page 421)
    • 25. Clause Coordination (page 422)
    • 26. Subordinate Clauses (page 436)
  • Chapter 4- Rhetorical Figures (page 463)
    • 27. Paronomasia (page 463)
    • 28. Syntactic Features (page 467)
    • 29. Lexical Features (page 489)
    • 30. Iconic Features (page 537)
  • Bibliography (page 551)
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