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Isaac the Syrian's Spiritual Works


Edited and Translated by Mary T. Hansbury
Isaac the Syrian lived the solitary life in the 7th century. He was born in Qatar and subsequently lived in present day Iraq and Iran. After life as a monk, then briefly as a bishop, he withdrew to live the solitary life. These discourses are primarily for solitaries to consolidate them in the love and mercy of God. In this volume, the text of Isaac V has also been included because of the light which it sheds on Apocatastasis, of increasing interest in academic and ecclesial circles.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0593-5
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Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jul 25,2016
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 403
Languages: English, Syriac
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0593-5
$45.50
$27.30

Isaac the Syrian lived the solitary life in the 7th century. He was born in Qatar and subsequently lived in present day Iraq and Iran. After life as a monk, then briefly as a bishop, he withdrew to live the solitary life. These discourses are primarily for solitaries to consolidate them in the love and mercy of God. Isaac returns frequently in this work to the theme of joy as it relates to repentance and also to inebriation – even as it were, as a participation in divine Nature. In ch.5, he discusses theosis. Discussions of divinization are not that common to his writings. Already Isaac has been able to cross all kinds of boundaries, both geographical and ecclesial. Now with theosis in ch. 5 there is possibility of ongoing discussion in Asian Christianity, especially with India in relation to Advaita. In this volume, the text of Isaac V has also been included because of the light which it sheds on Apocatastasis, of increasing interest in academic and ecclesial circles. Isaac III was originally edited and translated by Sabino Chialà of Bose. A French translation was subsequently done by Andre Louf.

Mary Hansbury received her Ph.D. from Temple University in Philadelphia, specializing in Early Christian Studies in a World Religions context. Her program included Syriac language studies at Princeton University and Hebrew at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Previously she translated On the Ascetical Life of St. Isaac of Nineveh; John the Solitary on the Soul; and the Letters of John of Dalyatha. She has also translated and edited some of the homilies of Jacob of Serug. She studied in China for a semester and conducted research on the contact between the East Syrian tradition and Buddhism during the Tang dynasty. Presently she returns regularly to do research at SEERI, the Syriac center in Kerala, India. She is trained as an iconographer and in addition to traditional motifs, explores the connection between word and image in Scripture and in the early Syriac tradition.

Isaac the Syrian lived the solitary life in the 7th century. He was born in Qatar and subsequently lived in present day Iraq and Iran. After life as a monk, then briefly as a bishop, he withdrew to live the solitary life. These discourses are primarily for solitaries to consolidate them in the love and mercy of God. Isaac returns frequently in this work to the theme of joy as it relates to repentance and also to inebriation – even as it were, as a participation in divine Nature. In ch.5, he discusses theosis. Discussions of divinization are not that common to his writings. Already Isaac has been able to cross all kinds of boundaries, both geographical and ecclesial. Now with theosis in ch. 5 there is possibility of ongoing discussion in Asian Christianity, especially with India in relation to Advaita. In this volume, the text of Isaac V has also been included because of the light which it sheds on Apocatastasis, of increasing interest in academic and ecclesial circles. Isaac III was originally edited and translated by Sabino Chialà of Bose. A French translation was subsequently done by Andre Louf.

Mary Hansbury received her Ph.D. from Temple University in Philadelphia, specializing in Early Christian Studies in a World Religions context. Her program included Syriac language studies at Princeton University and Hebrew at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Previously she translated On the Ascetical Life of St. Isaac of Nineveh; John the Solitary on the Soul; and the Letters of John of Dalyatha. She has also translated and edited some of the homilies of Jacob of Serug. She studied in China for a semester and conducted research on the contact between the East Syrian tradition and Buddhism during the Tang dynasty. Presently she returns regularly to do research at SEERI, the Syriac center in Kerala, India. She is trained as an iconographer and in addition to traditional motifs, explores the connection between word and image in Scripture and in the early Syriac tradition.

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Contributor Biography

Mary Hansbury

Mary T. Hansbury, retired, has taught at La Salle University in Philadelphia and at Bethlehem University in Palestine. Her Ph.D. is from Temple University with additional work done in Jewish studies at Hebrew University and Syriac at Princeton University. She has previously published translations of St. Ephrem, Jacob of Serug, Isaac the Syrian, John of Dalyatha and is currently translating the CSCO edition (2011) of Isaac 3.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Isaac the Syrian: The Third Part (page 7)
    • Preface (page 7)
    • Context (page 8)
    • Sub-text (page 8)
    • Outline (page 10)
    • Text and Translation - Isaac the Syrian: The Third Part (page 14)
    • Biblical References (page 322)
    • Some Key Concepts (page 328)
    • Abbreviations (page 330)
    • Bibliography of Works Cited (page 331)
  • Two Discourses of the Fifth Part of Isaac the Syrian's Writings (page 345)
    • Introduction (page 345)
    • Conclusion (page 351)
    • Bibliography (page 353)
    • Text and Translation - From the Fifth Part of Mar Isaac, bishop of Nineveh (page 356)
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