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Jacob of Serugh, Homily on Good Friday and Other Armenian Treasures


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Jacob of Serugh's Armenian version of “Homily on Good Friday” is most likely from the reign of Gregory III Pahlawuni (1113–1166 AD). Mathews provides its transcription, commenting that scholarship is widely unaware of Jacob of Serugh’s existing works in Armenian.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0096-1
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 1048
Publication Date: Dec 14,2011
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 33
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0096-1
$37.00
$22.20

The translation period of the Homily on Good Friday is attributed to the reign of Gregory, the Catholicos of the Armenians, thought to be Gregory III Pahlawuni (1113–1166 AD). The style of its original source remains unclear, but the homily closely resembles Jacob of Serugh’s Syriac works. Homily on Good Friday dwells on Jesus while suffering on the Cross, Mary’s lament, her accusations against protectors Gabriel and Michael, their assurance, and Jesus’ conversation with the thief beside him. Mathews includes a transcription, commenting that scholarship is widely unaware of Jacob of Serugh’s existing work in Armenian. Mathews identifies seventeen such homilies, seven without Syriac originals.

The translation period of the Homily on Good Friday is attributed to the reign of Gregory, the Catholicos of the Armenians, thought to be Gregory III Pahlawuni (1113–1166 AD). The style of its original source remains unclear, but the homily closely resembles Jacob of Serugh’s Syriac works. Homily on Good Friday dwells on Jesus while suffering on the Cross, Mary’s lament, her accusations against protectors Gabriel and Michael, their assurance, and Jesus’ conversation with the thief beside him. Mathews includes a transcription, commenting that scholarship is widely unaware of Jacob of Serugh’s existing work in Armenian. Mathews identifies seventeen such homilies, seven without Syriac originals.

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Contributor

Edward G.***OLD ACCT*** Mathews, Jr.

  • The Armenian Homily on Good Friday (page 8)
  • Jacob of Serugh in Armenian (page 22)
  • I. Texts with Surviving Syriac Originals (page 24)
  • II. Texts with no apparent surviving Syriac originals (page 27)
  • III. Others (page 29)
  • Conclusions (page 32)
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