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Jesus as New Moses in Matthew 8–9

Jewish Typology in First Century Greek Literature


This volume explores the fascinating narrative structure and thematic elements of Matthew 8–9 which typologically present Jesus as the ‘New-Moses’ leading his people out of eschatlogical exile. This typology is created using imagery of Jesus’ healing diseases which find their antecedent in the Mosaic legal suit of Deut 28–30, and Matthew’s explicit citation of Isa. 53, in which the Servant is predominantly envisioned as a Mosaic figure. The intervening call narratives brings a reconstitution of the twelve tribes. The author concludes by exploring the possible rationale and motivation for Matthew’s typological association of Jesus with Moses.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0086-2
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Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Jun 27,2013
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 230
Languages: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0086-2
$140.00
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This volume explores the fascinating narrative structure and thematic elements of Matthew 8–9 which typologically present Jesus as the ‘New-Moses’ (and at points as greater than Moses) leading his people out of Exile After offering a historical survey of modern scholarship on Mosaic typology in Matthew, the author presents a comprehensive survey of primary source literature as it pertains to Mosaic recollection in the ancient world.

Particular attention is given to Moses’ ‘mighty deeds,’ as these contribute to Israel’s deliverance from Egypt, and forms the basis for Israel’s future hopes. Matthew’s structural arrangement of material (both at the macro and micro level) clearly display Mosaic influence. Thematic links between Matthew 8–9 and the life of Moses also contribute to this typology, including 1) imagery used to refer to Israel’s final eschatological return from ‘Egyptian’ exile, 2) Jesus’ healing of conditions which find their antecedent in the Mosaic legal suit against Israel in Deut 28–30, and most significantly 3) Matthew’s explicit citation of Isa. 53, in which the Servant is predominantly, although not exhaustively, envisioned as a Mosaic figure.

Matthew also draws on the memory of Moses at the Red Sea, yet goes beyond it in one significant regard, portraying Jesus as ‘greater than Moses.’ The intervening call narratives (scribe, tax collector, disciples), brings the proceeding material to a climax in that a reconstitution of the twelve tribes is recalled. The author concludes by exploring the possible rationale and motivation for Matthew’s typological association of Jesus with Moses.

This volume explores the fascinating narrative structure and thematic elements of Matthew 8–9 which typologically present Jesus as the ‘New-Moses’ (and at points as greater than Moses) leading his people out of Exile After offering a historical survey of modern scholarship on Mosaic typology in Matthew, the author presents a comprehensive survey of primary source literature as it pertains to Mosaic recollection in the ancient world.

Particular attention is given to Moses’ ‘mighty deeds,’ as these contribute to Israel’s deliverance from Egypt, and forms the basis for Israel’s future hopes. Matthew’s structural arrangement of material (both at the macro and micro level) clearly display Mosaic influence. Thematic links between Matthew 8–9 and the life of Moses also contribute to this typology, including 1) imagery used to refer to Israel’s final eschatological return from ‘Egyptian’ exile, 2) Jesus’ healing of conditions which find their antecedent in the Mosaic legal suit against Israel in Deut 28–30, and most significantly 3) Matthew’s explicit citation of Isa. 53, in which the Servant is predominantly, although not exhaustively, envisioned as a Mosaic figure.

Matthew also draws on the memory of Moses at the Red Sea, yet goes beyond it in one significant regard, portraying Jesus as ‘greater than Moses.’ The intervening call narratives (scribe, tax collector, disciples), brings the proceeding material to a climax in that a reconstitution of the twelve tribes is recalled. The author concludes by exploring the possible rationale and motivation for Matthew’s typological association of Jesus with Moses.

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ContributorBiography

MichaelTheophilos

Michael P. Theophilos is Lecturer in Biblical Studies within the Faculty of Theology and Philosophy at the Australian Catholic University. He holds a doctorate in Theology from Oxford University, and an MA degree in Ancient History from Macquarie University. His previous publications have made a considerable contribution to the understanding of the intersection of the Greco-Roman world and the New Testament.

  • Table of Contents (page 7)
  • Abstract (page 11)
  • Introductory Issues (page 13)
  • Chapter 1. Scholarship on Mosaic Typology in Matthew (page 17)
  • Chapter 2. Mighty Deeds of Jesus, Moses and the Jewish Sign Prophets (page 37)
  • Chapter 3. Structure and Meaning (page 69)
  • Chapter 4. The First Cycle (Mt 8:1-22) (page 91)
  • Chapter 5. The Second Cycle (Mt 8:23-9:17) (page 137)
  • Chapter 6. The Third Cycle (Mt 9:18-10:4) (page 155)
  • Chapter 7. Summary, Rationale and Conclusion (page 175)
  • Appendix 1 (page 183)
  • Appendix 2 (page 185)
  • Selected Bibliography (page 219)
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