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Jews, Christians and Zoroastrians


Religious Dynamics in a Sasanian Context


Edited by Geoffrey Herman
The Sasanian Empire was home to many religious communities. It was also a place of meeting and transformation. The studies in this volume encompass a diverse array of topics concerning these religious communities inhabiting the Sasanian Empire. Some include the Roman East in their deliberations. Most, however, deal with the interaction of one or other religious community based in the Sasanian Empire with the dominant religion of the empire, Zoroastrianism.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0250-7
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Publication Status: In Print

Series: Judaism in Context 17
Publication Date: Oct 1,2015
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 325
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0250-7
$95.00
$57.00

The Sasanian Empire was home to many religious communities. It was also a place of meeting and transformation. It was where old religions met more recent arrivals, and where both new and old were transformed as a result of this contact. While some religious communities shared more than others, and this for historical or geographical reasons, some form of contact and exchange with Zoroastrianism, the religion of the ruling dynasty and of many of the inhabitants of the empire was undoubtedly the rule for all.

The studies in this volume explore the dynamics between these communities within the broad Sasanian religious and cultural context and encompass a diverse array of topics concerning, in particular, Jews, Christians, and Manichaeans. Some include the Roman East in their deliberations. Most, however, deal with the interaction of one or other Sasanian religious community with Zoroastrianism.

The Sasanian Empire was home to many religious communities. It was also a place of meeting and transformation. It was where old religions met more recent arrivals, and where both new and old were transformed as a result of this contact. While some religious communities shared more than others, and this for historical or geographical reasons, some form of contact and exchange with Zoroastrianism, the religion of the ruling dynasty and of many of the inhabitants of the empire was undoubtedly the rule for all.

The studies in this volume explore the dynamics between these communities within the broad Sasanian religious and cultural context and encompass a diverse array of topics concerning, in particular, Jews, Christians, and Manichaeans. Some include the Roman East in their deliberations. Most, however, deal with the interaction of one or other Sasanian religious community with Zoroastrianism.

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Contributor Biography

Geoffrey Herman

Geoffrey Herman is a researcher at the Mandel Scholion Interdisciplinary Research Center in the Humanities and Jewish Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has published extensively on the history of religious life in the Sasanian era. Among his publications are A Prince without a Kingdom: The Exilarch in the Sasanian Era (Mohr Siebeck, 2012) and Jews, Christians and Zoroastrians: Religious Dynamics in a Sasanian Context (Gorgias Press, 2014).

Adam Becker

Reuven Kiperwasser

Serge Ruzer

Albert De Jong

Peter Bruns

Sergey Minov

Richard Kalmin

Isaiah Gafni

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Preface (page 7)
  • Abbreviations (page 9)
  • Introduction (page 11)
  • Political Theology and Religious Diversity in the Sasanian Empaire (by Adam H. Becker) (page 17)
  • Another 'Split Diaspora'? How Knowledgeable (or Ignorant) were Babylonian Jews about Roman Palestine and its Jews? (by Isaiah M. Gafni) (page 37)
  • Antizoroastrische Polemik in den Syro-Persischen Martyrerakten (by Peter Burns) (page 57)
  • The Last Years of Yazdgird I and the Christians (by Geoffrey Herman) (page 77)
  • To Convert a Persian and Teach him the Holy Scriptures: A Zoroastrian Proselyte in Rabbinic and Syriac Christian Narratives (by Reuven Kiperwasser and Serge Ruzer) (page 101)
  • The Cologne Mani Codex and the Life of Zarathushtra (by Albert De Jong) (page 139)
  • Dynamics of Christian Acculturation in the Sasanian Empire: Some Iranian Motifs in the Cave of Treasures (by Sergey Minov) (page 159)
  • Zechariah and the Bubbling Blood: An Ancient Tradition in Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Literature (by Richard Kalmin) (page 213)
  • Bibliography (page 263)
  • List of Contributors (page 307)
  • Index (page 311)
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