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Keter Shem Tov


Essays on the Dead Sea Scrolls in Memory of Alan Crown


Edited by Shani Tzoref & Ian Young
This eclectic collection contains 16 articles on a variety of topics within Qumran Studies from a conference held in memory of the late Professor Alan Crown. Essays cover the impact of the Qumran discoveries on the study of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament to the study of the scrolls themselves and the community organizations presupposed in them, focusing as well on topics as diverse as sexuality, scribal practice and the attitude to the Temple in the scrolls.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-866-6
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 3,2013
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 410
Languages: English, Hebrew
ISBN: 978-1-61143-866-6
$150.00

This volume contains the proceedings of a conference on the Dead Sea Scrolls held in memory of the late Emeritus Professor Alan Crown in late 2011 at the University of Sydney, Mandelbaum House. This eclectic collection contains 16 articles on a variety of topics within Qumran Studies from established scholars in the field such as Emanuel Tov, Albert Baumgarten, William Loader and Shani Tzoref as well as exciting new voices in the field.

Topics cover the full range of scholarly study of the Scrolls, from the impact of the Qumran discoveries on the study of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament to the study of the scrolls themselves and the community organizations presupposed in them, focusing as well on topics as diverse as sexuality, scribal practice and the attitude to the Temple in the scrolls.

This volume contains the proceedings of a conference on the Dead Sea Scrolls held in memory of the late Emeritus Professor Alan Crown in late 2011 at the University of Sydney, Mandelbaum House. This eclectic collection contains 16 articles on a variety of topics within Qumran Studies from established scholars in the field such as Emanuel Tov, Albert Baumgarten, William Loader and Shani Tzoref as well as exciting new voices in the field.

Topics cover the full range of scholarly study of the Scrolls, from the impact of the Qumran discoveries on the study of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament to the study of the scrolls themselves and the community organizations presupposed in them, focusing as well on topics as diverse as sexuality, scribal practice and the attitude to the Temple in the scrolls.

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Contributor Biography

Ian Young

Ian Young is Associate Professor of Biblical Studies and Classical Hebrew at the University of Sydney.

Shani Tzoref

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Abbreviations (page 7)
  • Introduction (page 11)
  • Eulogy of Alan Crown (page 19)
  • Part 1. Qumran Scholarship: Now and Then (page 25)
    • Qumran Communities - Past and Present (Shani Tzoref) (page 27)
      • 1. Three Phases of Qumran Scholarship: Access and Publication (Linear Model) (page 28)
        • 1.1. Phase 1: Acquisitions and Allocation, a Closed Circle (page 29)
        • 1.2. Phase 2: Breaking the Barriers, Broadening the Field (page 33)
        • 1.3. Phase 3: Cooperation and Collaboration (page 37)
      • 2. Triadic Development Model: Identifying the Community of the Scrolls (page 43)
        • 2.1. Phase 1: Thesis - Essene Hypothesis (page 44)
        • 2.2. Phase 2: Antithesis: Non-Essene Hypothesis (page 47)
        • 2.3. Phase 3: Synthesis: Essene-Related(?) Communities (page 50)
          • 2.3.1. Complexity, Diversity, and Development (page 52)
      • 3. Proposal: Inverse Correlation Between Development of Qumran Community and Trajectory of Academic communis opinio (page 57)
      • 4. Conclusion (page 60)
      • Appendix: Millar Burrows, An Outlier (page 60)
  • Part 2. Textual Transmission of the Hebrew Bible (page 67)
    • The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls: the Proximity of the Pre-Samaritan Qumran Scrolls to the SP (Emanuel Tov) (page 69)
      • 1. SP and the Qumran Scrolls (page 71)
        • 1.1. Large Editorial Changes (page 73)
        • 1.2. Harmonizations (page 80)
          • 1.2.1. 4QpaleoExod-m (page 81)
          • 1.2.2. 4QExod-Lev-f (page 82)
          • 1.2.3. 4QNum-b (page 83)
          • 1.2.4. 4QRP-b (4Q364) (page 85)
          • 1.2.5. Summary: Harmonizations in the Pre-Samaritan Text Compared With Other Texts (page 86)
        • 1.3. Orthogaphy (page 87)
      • 2. The SP and the Pre-Samaritan Scrolls: Synthesis (page 87)
        • 2.1. 4QpaleoExod-m (page 88)
        • 2.2. 4QExod-Lev-f (page 89)
        • 2.3. 4QNum-b (page 89)
        • 2.4. 4QRP-a (4Q158) (page 89)
        • 2.5. 4QRP-b (1Q364) (page 90)
        • 2.6. Summary: Relations in Small Details Between the Sources (page 90)
        • 2.7. Conclusions (page 91)
      • 3. The SP-group and the LXX (page 94)
      • 4. Conclusions (page 98)
    • "Loose" Language in 1QIsa-a (Ian Young) (page 99)
      • 1. The Uniqueness of 1QIsa-a (page 99)
      • 2. What I Thought (page 104)
      • 3. LBH Features in First Isaiah (page 104)
      • 4. Is Second Isaiah in Transitional Hebrew? (page 108)
      • 5. Is 1QIsa-a in Late Biblical Hebrew? (page 111)
        • 5.1. Isaiah 3-5/ 5-6 in 1QIsa-a (page 111)
        • 5.2. Isaiah 44-46 in 1QIsa-a (page 115)
        • 5.3. Isaiah 36-37 in 1QIsa-a (page 117)
      • 6. Conclusion: I was wrong! (page 121)
    • The Contrast Between the Qumran and Masada Biblical Scrolls in the Light of New Data. A Note in Light of the Alan Crown Festschrift (Ian Young) (page 123)
  • Part 3. Reception of Scripture in the Dead Sea Scrolls (page 131)
    • A Case for Two Vorlagen Behind the Habakkuk Commentary (1QpHab) (Stephen Llewelyn, Stephanie Ng, Gareth Wearne and Alexandra Wrathall) (page 133)
      • 1. Introduction (page 133)
      • 2. Description (page 134)
      • 3. Past Interpretations (page 135)
        • 3.1. The Crosses (page 136)
        • 3.2. The Vacats (page 140)
      • 4. Towards an Explanation (page 142)
      • 5. A Case for Two Vorlagen (page 144)
        • 5.1. The Double Use of Pesher (Column 2) (page 144)
        • 5.2. Requotation Formulae and Irregular Vacats (page 145)
        • 5.3. Different Versions of the Prophet (page 147)
        • 5.4. Awkward Anaphora and Different Interpretation in the Requotation (Column 5) (page 148)
        • 5.5. A Different Requotation (Column 12) (page 150)
      • 6. Conclusion (page 157)
    • "Holy Ones" and "(Holy) People" in Daniel and 1QM (Anne Gardner) (page 161)
      • 1. Introduction (page 161)
      • 2. Scholarly Arguments and Counter Arguments About QADISHE in Dan 7:18, 21 22, 25 (page 164)
      • 3. People as "Holy Ones" or a "Holy One" in the Hebrew Bible (page 166)
      • 4. ELYONIN in Daniel 7 (page 168)
      • 5. Dan 7:27: AM in conjuction with QADISHE ELYONIN (page 169)
      • 6. A Resolution of the Dilemma: Intertextual Links (page 171)
      • 7. Biblical Passages That Indicate "Holy Ones" are Not all Israel (page 172)
      • 8. The War Scroll (page 180)
        • 8.1. 1QM 3:4-5 (page 183)
        • 8.2. 1QM 6:6 (page 184)
        • 8.3. 1QM 9:7-8 (page 185)
        • 8.4. 1QM 10:9-10 (page 186)
        • 8.5. 1QM 10:11-12 (page 187)
        • 8.6. 1QM 12:1 (page 187)
        • 8.7. 1QM 15:14-15 (page 190)
        • 8.8. 1QM 16:1 (page 190)
        • 8.9. 1QM 18.2 (page 191)
      • 9. The Relationship Between "Holy Ones" in Daniel and in 1QM (page 192)
    • What has Qohelet to do with Qumran? (Martin A. Shields) (page 195)
      • 1. Introduction (page 195)
      • 2. (4Q) Instruction and the Book of Mysteries (page 196)
      • 3. Community Rule (1QS) (page 203)
      • 4. The Status of Qohelet at Qumran (page 207)
      • 5. Conclusion (page 211)
    • 4QTestimonia (4Q175) and the Epistle of Jude (John A. Davies) (page 213)
    • Plant Symbolism and Dreams of Noah and Abram in the Genesis Apocryphon (Marianne Dacy) (page 227)
      • 1. Introduction (page 227)
      • 2. Nature and Genre (page 229)
      • 3. The Date of the Composition and the Scroll (page 231)
      • 4. Plant Symbolism in the Noah Cycle (page 232)
        • 4.1. Vine (page 234)
        • 4.2. Noah's Dreams (page 235)
          • 4.2.1. Column 13 (page 235)
          • 4.2.2. Column 14 (page 238)
        • 4.3. Abram's dream (page 240)
          • 4.3.1. Cedar and palm tree (Abram and Sarai) (page 241)
      • 5. Conclusions (page 242)
  • Part 4. Community and the Dead Sea Scrolls (page 243)
    • What Did The "Teacher" Know?: Owls and Roosters in the Qumran Barnyard (Albert I. Baumgarten) (page 245)
      • 1. Frank Moore Cross and the Making of Consensus (page 246)
      • 2. Doubts About the Qumran-Essene Connection (page 247)
      • 3. Qumran Apocalypticism (page 248)
      • 4. Pesher Habakkuk (page 251)
      • 5. Dissidents and Disconfirmation (page 259)
      • 6. A Second Understanding of 1QpHab 7:1-8 (page 261)
      • 7. Roosters and Owls (page 265)
    • Exclusion and Ethics: Contrasting Covenant Communities in 1QS 5:1-7:25 and 1 Cor 5:1-6:11 (Bradley J. Bitner) (page 269)
      • 1. Introduction: The Neglected Aspect of a Comparison (page 269)
      • 2. Genealogy of a Comparison (page 270)
      • 3. Comparative Method: From Discourse to Dynamics (page 276)
      • 4. Mapping the Discourses (page 280)
        • 4.1. 1 Cor 5:1-6:11 (page 280)
          • 4.1.1. Terms (page 282)
          • 4.1.2. Citation and Allusion (page 284)
          • 4.1.3. Resources (page 286)
          • 4.1.4. Rhetoric (page 289)
        • 4.2. 1QS 5:1-7:25 (page 294)
          • 4.2.1. Terms (page 296)
          • 4.2.2. Citations (page 299)
          • 4.2.3. Resources (page 301)
          • 4.2.4. Rhetoric (page 303)
      • 5. Dynamics of Covenant Community: Comparison and Contrast (page 305)
        • 5.1. Similarities (page 305)
        • 5.2. Contrasts (page 308)
          • 5.2.1. Rhetorical Shape (page 308)
          • 5.2.2. Terminology (page 309)
          • 5.2.3. Scriptural Resources (page 309)
          • 5.2.4. Genre (page 310)
          • 5.2.5. Rhetorical Effects (page 311)
          • 5.2.6. Communal Structure (page 311)
          • 5.2.7. Dynamics of Process (page 313)
      • 6. Conclusion (page 314)
    • Eschatology and Sexuality in the So-Called Sectarian Documents from Qumran (William Loader) (page 315)
  • Part 5. The Temple and the Dead Sea Scrolls (page 327)
    • A Temple Built of Words: Exploring Concepts of the Divine in the Damascus Document (Dionysia A. van Beek) (page 329)
      • 1. Introduction (page 329)
      • 2. The Damascus Document (page 332)
      • 3. The Function of CD: A Description of the Covenant People (page 333)
        • 3.1. Three Shema's (page 333)
        • 3.2. The Structure of CD-A (page 334)
      • 4. The Reception of the Temple (page 336)
        • 4.1. Sacred Space and the Temple/Tabernacle (page 336)
        • 4.2. Cultic Function in the CD and the Temple (page 338)
      • 5. What to Make of the Similarities between the Temple and CD (page 341)
    • 4Q174 and the Epistle of the Hebrews (Philip Church) (page 343)
      • 1. Introduction (page 343)
      • 2. The Three Sanctuaries of 4Q174 (page 347)
      • 3. 4Q174 and Hebrews (page 355)
        • 3.1. The Last Days (page 355)
        • 3.2. A Sacrifice of Praise (page 356)
        • 3.3. The Eschatological Temple (page 356)
          • 3.3.1. The World to Come - Heb 1:6 (page 356)
          • 3.3.2. God's Rest - Heb 3-4 (page 359)
          • 3.3.3. An Enthroned High Priest - Heb 8:1-2 (page 361)
          • 3.3.4. The True Tent that the Lord has Pitched - Heb 8:2 (page 363)
          • 3.3.5. A City Prepared by God - Heb 11:16 (page 364)
          • 3.3.6. Mount Zion, the Heavenly Jerusalem - Heb 12:18-24 (page 365)
        • 3.4. Summary and Conclusions (page 369)
    • The Temple Scroll: "The Day of Blessing" or "The Day of Creation"? Insights on Shekinah and Sabbath (Antoinette Collins) (page 371)
      • 1. Introduction (page 371)
      • 2. What is the Temple Scroll? (page 372)
      • 3. Date of the Temple Scroll (page 374)
      • 4. The Temple of the Temple Scroll (page 374)
      • 5. An Earthly, Heavenly or Eschatological Temple? (page 375)
      • 6. Shekinah and Sabbath (page 377)
        • 6.1. Covenant at Bethel (page 378)
        • 6.2. Shekinah (page 379)
        • 6.3. The Day of Blessing / Creation: Sabbath (page 381)
      • 7. Summary (page 383)
  • List of Contributors (page 385)
  • Index of Authors (page 387)
  • Index of Ancient Sources (page 395)
    • Hebrew Bible (page 395)
    • Apocrypha (page 404)
    • Pseudepigrapha (page 407)
    • Dead Sea Scrolls (page 408)
    • Philo (page 410)
    • Josephus (page 410)
    • Rabbinic and Medieval Jewish Literature (page 410)
    • Epigraphic Sources (page 410)
    • Early Christian Literature (page 410)
    • Greek and Roman Literature (page 410)
    • Other Bible Versions (page 410)
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