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Language and Textual History of the Syriac Bible


Collected Studies


The Syriac Bible is a fascinating field to which too little research has been devoted. In the present volume, Jan Joosten gathers a number of pilot studies, published in various journals and collective volumes, shedding light on the Syriac Old Testament, New Testament, and the relation between them. A number of studies advance the claim that the Old Syriac and Peshitta gospels preserve echoes of an Aramaic gospel tradition that gives independent access to the earliest, oral traditions on the life and teaching of Jesus.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-891-8
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Publication Status: In Print

Series: Texts and Studies 9
Publication Date: Oct 21,2013
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 328
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-891-8
$95.00
$57.00

The Syriac Bible is a fascinating field to which too little serious research has been devoted. In the present volume, Jan Joosten gathers a number of pilot studies, published in various journals and collected volumes, shedding light on the Syriac "Old Testament," on the Syriac New Testament, and on the relationship between them. Although some of the studies are technical, their implications range widely. Notably, a number of studies advance the claim that the Old Syriac and Peshitta gospels preserve echoes of an Aramaic gospel tradition that bypassed the Greek gospels and gives independent access to the earliest, oral, traditions on the life and teaching of Jesus.

The Syriac Bible is a fascinating field to which too little serious research has been devoted. In the present volume, Jan Joosten gathers a number of pilot studies, published in various journals and collected volumes, shedding light on the Syriac "Old Testament," on the Syriac New Testament, and on the relationship between them. Although some of the studies are technical, their implications range widely. Notably, a number of studies advance the claim that the Old Syriac and Peshitta gospels preserve echoes of an Aramaic gospel tradition that bypassed the Greek gospels and gives independent access to the earliest, oral, traditions on the life and teaching of Jesus.

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Contributor Biography

Jan Joosten

Jan Joosten is professor of Old Testament Exegesis at the Theological Faculty of the University of Strasbourg, France. He holds doctorates from the Hebrew University and the Protestant Faculty in Brussels. His main interests are the text and versions of the Bible, Hebrew grammar, and biblical rhetoric.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Preface (page 11)
  • Old Testament Peshitta (page 15)
    • General (page 17)
      • La Peshitta de l'Ancien Testament dans la recherche recente (page 19)
        • La tradition manuscrite de la PAT (page 20)
        • La PAT et les Targoums (page 23)
        • Milieu et date de la PAT (page 26)
        • La PAT et la Septante (page 30)
        • Perspectives de recherche (page 32)
    • Language (page 35)
      • The Use of some Particles in the Old Testament Peshitta (page 37)
        • 'Why' (page 39)
        • in Rhetorical Questions (page 41)
        • in Wish and Apodosis (page 43)
        • Used as a Conjuction (+ Imperfect) (page 46)
        • Conclusion (page 47)
      • Greek and Latin Words in the Peshitta Pentateuch First Soundings (page 49)
        • Problems of Identification (page 50)
        • Greek Words Slipping into the Manuscript Tradition (page 54)
        • Loanwords or Foreign Words? (page 56)
        • Some Statistics (page 57)
        • Further Questions (page 59)
        • Appendix: Check-List of Greek Words in the Peshitta Pentateuch (page 60)
      • Materials for a Linguistic Approach to the Old Testament Peshitta (page 63)
        • Introduction (page 63)
        • The OTP is Written in Idiomatic Syriac (page 66)
        • The OTP is Written in Early Syriac (page 72)
        • Non-Syriac Elements in the OTP (page 78)
        • Conclusion (page 81)
    • The Peshitta and other Translations of the Hebrew Bible (page 83)
      • Doublet translations in Peshitta Proverbs (page 85)
        • The Peshitta Version of Proverbs (page 86)
        • A Survey of the Seven Doublet Translations (page 89)
        • Conclusions (page 96)
      • Greek Words shared by the Peshitta and Targums to the Pentateuch (page 99)
        • The Evidence (page 100)
        • Agreements Due to the Independent Borrowing from Greek (page 102)
        • Greek Words Going Back to an Exegetical Tradition (page 106)
          • The Greek Word is not an Obvious Equivalent (page 106)
          • The Greek Loan is Poorly Attested (page 108)
          • The Testimony of Symmachus (page 110)
        • Conclusions (page 112)
    • The Use of the Peshitta in Textual Criticism (page 113)
      • 1 Sam XVI 6, 7 in the Peshitta Version (page 115)
        • Introduction (page 115)
        • 1 Sam. XVI 6 (page 116)
        • 1 Sam. XVI 7 (page 118)
        • The Coherence of the Peshitta Version of 1 Sam. XVI 6-7 (page 120)
        • The text of 1 Sam. XVI 6-7 (page 121)
      • The Hebrew and Syriac text of Deut 1:44 (page 123)
        • A Problem of Style (page 124)
        • The Peshitta and its Vorlage (page 127)
        • Conclusion (page 128)
    • The Old Testament Peshitta in the Syriac New Testament (page 129)
      • The Old Testament in the New: The Syriac Versions of the New Testament as a Witness to the Text of the Old Testament Peshitta (page 131)
        • Tatian's Use of the OTP (page 131)
        • Acts and Epistles (page 134)
        • The Syriac New Testament's Witness to the OTP (page 135)
        • Case Study: Rom 10:19 - Deut 32:21 (page 137)
        • Conclusion (page 140)
  • Syriac Gosples (page 141)
    • West Aramaic Elements in the Syriac Gospel Version (page 143)
      • West Aramaic Elements in the Old Syriac and Peshitta Gospels (page 145)
        • The West Aramaic Elements (page 147)
          • Criteria (page 147)
          • The List (page 148)
          • Fremdkorper (page 149)
          • Christian Loanwords (page 157)
          • Jewish Expressions (page 158)
        • Conclusions (page 160)
        • Evaluation (page 160)
          • A Different Syriac Dialect or the Translation Process? (page 161)
          • Intention of the Translator or External Influence? (page 163)
          • A West Aramaic Gospel Tradition? (page 164)
        • The West Aramaic Tradition: Tatian's Fifth Source? (page 167)
          • West Aramaic Elements in Diatessaric Quotations (page 168)
          • The Testimony of the Peshitta (page 169)
          • The Fifth Source of the Diatessaron (page 170)
          • Tatian's Motivation for Using a Fifth Source (page 171)
      • Two West Aramaic Elements in the Old Syriac and Peshitta Gosples (page 173)
        • "Cross"; "to Crucify" (page 174)
        • "The Twelve" (page 176)
      • West Aramaic Elements in the Syriac Gospels: Methodological Considerations (page 179)
        • West Aramaic Loanwords in the Syriac Christian Vocabulary (page 180)
        • The Beginnings of Eastern Christianity (page 186)
        • Perspectives (page 187)
      • <>: La provenance occidentale d'une locution syriaque (page 189)
        • La fonction des verbes et (pa'el) en syriaque (page 191)
        • Les verbes et dans les evangiles (Peshitta et Vetus Syra) (page 192)
        • Autres exemples du verbe "Envoyer quelqu'un" (page 195)
          • Aphrahat (page 196)
          • Ephrem (page 196)
          • Actes de Thomas (page 196)
        • Conclusions (page 198)
    • The Aramaic Tradition of the Gospels and the Syriac Gospels (page 201)
      • La tradition syriaque des evangiles et la question du <> (page 203)
        • Le probleme du substrat semitique des evangiles (page 203)
        • Elements archaiques preserves par la tradition syriaque (page 207)
        • Les origines de l'eglise syriaque (page 214)
        • Quelques exemples (page 217)
        • Conclusions (page 222)
      • The Text of Matt 13:21a and Parallels in the Syriac Tradition (page 225)
        • Introduction (page 225)
        • The Syriac Versions of Matt 13:21a and Parallels (page 227)
        • The Significance of the Syriac Variant (page 230)
        • The History of the Text of Matt 13:21a and Parallels (page 232)
          • The Text-Critical Value of the Syriac Versions of the Gospels (page 233)
    • The Syriac Versions of the Gospels and the Old Testament Peshitta (page 235)
      • The Old Testament Quotations in the Old Syriac and Peshitta Gosples A Contribution to the Study of the Diatessaron (page 237)
        • Introduction (page 237)
        • The Traces of OTP Text (page 242)
        • The List (page 243)
          • Clear examples of OTP dependence (page 243)
          • Additional cases of OTP dependence (page 246)
          • Cases where OTP text had been obscured by a revisor (page 249)
          • Possible cases of harmonization with parallel passages (page 250)
        • Conclusions (page 252)
          • The distribution of traces of OTP text over P, C, and S (page 252)
          • The marks of correction towards the Greek in the OT quotations (page 253)
          • The cases where OTP = P/C/S = Greek (page 254)
        • The Provenance of OTP Text in the OT Quotations (page 254)
        • OTP Text in OT Quotations: A Mark of Antiquity (page 254)
        • Old Syriac and Peshitta: Revisions of an Older Text (page 255)
          • Old Syriac (page 255)
          • Peshitta (page 256)
        • Harmonistic Traits in the Text of the OT Quotations (page 257)
          • Harmonistic readings (page 257)
          • Parallel variants (page 258)
        • Conclusions (page 259)
        • Tatian's Use of the OTP (page 259)
      • Tatian's Diatessaron and The Old Testament Peshitta (page 261)
        • Traces of the OT Peshitta in Eastern Witnesses of the Diatessaron (page 262)
          • Ephrem's Commentary on the Diatessaron (page 263)
          • The Old Syriac and Peshitta Gospels (page 266)
          • The Arabic and Persian Harmonies (page 269)
          • Conclusions (page 270)
        • Traces of the OTP in Eastern and Western Witnesses (page 272)
          • A List of Relevant Readings (page 276)
          • Discussion (page 282)
        • Traces of the OTP Attested only in the West (page 284)
          • Conclusions (page 288)
    • Micellanea (page 291)
      • Odes de Salomon 7,3a Obervations sur un hellenisme dans le texte syriaque (page 293)
      • Elements d'arameen occidental dans la versions syriaque de Ben Sira (page 297)
        • Date et milieu de la traduction syriaque (page 298)
        • La version syriaque de Ben Sira et la Peshitta (page 300)
        • Elements occidentaux (page 303)
        • Conclusion (page 310)
  • Sources (page 313)
  • Index of Biblical References (page 315)
    • Old Testament (page 315)
    • New Testament (page 321)
  • Index of Syriac Words (page 325)
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