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The book is designed for students who wish to learn the principles of Latin phonetics as well as for more advanced students who wish to review or reevaluate these principles in the light of further philological and linguistic evidence. The body of the book comprises an extensive discussion of the various historical changes that went into the making of Latin, analyzing the development of the vocalic and consonantal systems in light of literary and epigraphical sources.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0048-0
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Gorgias Handbooks 21
Publication Date: May 10,2011
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 110
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0048-0
$36.50
$21.90

Latin Historical Phonetics illustrates the development of the sounds and phonetic rules of the Latin language as well as the differing modes of articulation in both Rome and its surrounding countryside. Addressed to all undergraduate students coming to grips with the Latin language, the book presupposes no prior knowledge of historical phonetics. The body of the book comprises an extensive discussion of the various historical changes that went into the making of Latin. After a short introduction dealing with the classification and articulation of Latin phonemes, it analyzes the development of the vocalic and consonantal systems in light of literary and epigraphical sources. The specific rules of this development are studied from the threefold viewpoint of historical phonetics, sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics, which highlight the social, psychic, and physiological causes of phonological development. Extracts from ancient grammarians are also used to aid the clear comprehension of historical linguistic data. Thousands of textual citations from Roman authors and inscriptions of all periods place these data firmly within their philological and historical context. An exhaustive bibliography on Latin historical philology and linguistics, furthermore, also make the book an invaluable resource for more advanced study.

Latin Historical Phonetics illustrates the development of the sounds and phonetic rules of the Latin language as well as the differing modes of articulation in both Rome and its surrounding countryside. Addressed to all undergraduate students coming to grips with the Latin language, the book presupposes no prior knowledge of historical phonetics. The body of the book comprises an extensive discussion of the various historical changes that went into the making of Latin. After a short introduction dealing with the classification and articulation of Latin phonemes, it analyzes the development of the vocalic and consonantal systems in light of literary and epigraphical sources. The specific rules of this development are studied from the threefold viewpoint of historical phonetics, sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics, which highlight the social, psychic, and physiological causes of phonological development. Extracts from ancient grammarians are also used to aid the clear comprehension of historical linguistic data. Thousands of textual citations from Roman authors and inscriptions of all periods place these data firmly within their philological and historical context. An exhaustive bibliography on Latin historical philology and linguistics, furthermore, also make the book an invaluable resource for more advanced study.

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Contributor Biography

Helen Perdicoyianni

Helene Perdicoyianni-Paleologou is the Adjunct professor of Classics and research fellow at The Hellenic College/Holy Cross, Brookline, MA. She holds a PhD in Classical Greek Philology from the University of Sorbonne and a Ph.D. in Latin Linguistics from the same University. She has written extensivley on classical linguistics in the field of semantics, pragmatics, discourse analysis, papyrology and epigraphy.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Foreword (page 9)
  • Acknowledgments (page 11)
  • Introduction (page 13)
    • 1. Vowels (page 13)
      • Timbre (page 13)
      • Lip rounding (page 14)
      • The length of vowels (page 14)
    • 2. Diphthongs and Semivowels (page 15)
      • Semivowels (page 16)
    • 3. Consonants (page 16)
      • Unvoiced and voiced plosives (page 16)
      • Fricatives (page 17)
      • h (page 17)
      • Aspirates (page 17)
      • Nasals (page 18)
      • Liquids (page 18)
      • x and z (page 18)
    • 4. Accentuation (page 18)
  • 1 Vowels (page 21)
    • I.1. Changes in the Phonemes of Subsequentsyllables Due to the Special Pronunciation of the Initial Syllable (page 21)
      • I.1.A. Vowels in medial syllables (page 21)
        • 1. Weakening (page 21)
      • Definition (page 21)
      • Short vowels in open medial syllables (page 21)
      • Short vowels in closed medial syllables (page 27)
      • Analogy (page 29)
      • Medial diphthongs (page 30)
      • Other special cases (page 31)
    • 2. Quantitative Change: Syncope (page 31)
      • Definition (page 31)
      • Syncope in open medial syllables (page 31)
      • Syncope in closed medial syllables (page 34)
      • I.1.B. Vowels in final syllables (page 35)
        • 1. Qualitative changes (page 35)
          • Short vowels (page 35)
            • In open final syllables (page 35)
            • In closed final syllables (page 36)
            • The diphthongs (page 39)
      • 2. Quantitative changes (page 41)
        • Loss of a short final vowel (page 41)
          • In open final syllables (apocope) (page 41)
        • Shortening of a long final vowel (page 44)
          • In open final syllables (page 44)
          • In closed final syllables (page 45)
    • I.2. Other Changes in Length Non-Final Syllables (page 46)
      • I.2.A. Qualitative changes in non-final syllables (page 46)
        • 1. Assimilation of a vowel with a consonant (page 46)
        • 2. Assimilation of a vowel with a semivowel (page 51)
        • 3. Vowel assimilation (page 56)
        • 4. Metaphony or Umlaut (page 57)
        • Regressive metaphony (page 57)
        • Progressive metaphony (page 58)
      • I.2.B. Quantitative changes in non final syllables (page 59)
        • 1. Compensatory lengthening (page 59)
        • 2. Shortening of long vowels (page 60)
        • 3. Insertion of vowels or semi-vowels (page 61)
  • 2 Consonants (page 63)
    • II.1. The Influence of Phonemes on Contiguous Phonemes (page 63)
      • II.1.A. Qualitative changes (page 63)
        • 1. Assimilation (page 63)
          • Definition (page 63)
          • Assimilation of consonants (page 63)
          • Total Assimilation (page 63)
          • Assimilation according to place of articulation (alwaysregressive) (page 64)
          • Assimilation according to manner of articulation (page 65)
          • Partial Assimilation (page 67)
          • Assimilation according to manner of articulation (page 67)
          • Voicing (page 67)
          • Nasality (page 68)
          • Place of articulation (page 68)
          • Assimilation of a consonant to vocalic segments (page 68)
          • Assimilation of a consonant into a semi-vowel (page 70)
        • 2. Differentiation (page 71)
        • 3. Development of an epenthetical phoneme (page 73)
        • 4. Metathesis (page 74)
          • Definition (page 74)
      • II.1.B. Quantitative changes (page 75)
        • 1. The disappearance of voiced phonemes (page 75)
        • Disappearance of voiced phonemes in contact bydissimilation (page 75)
        • Disappearance by increased aperture (page 76)
        • Disappearance by simplification or lengthening (page 78)
      • II.2. The Influence of Phonemes on Discontiguous Phonemes (page 81)
        • II.2.A. Consonantal assimilation (page 81)
        • II.2.B. Dissimilation (page 81)
          • Definition (page 81)
        • II.2.C. Haplology (page 85)
        • II.2.D. Metathesis (page 85)
      • II.3. Final Consonant (page 86)
        • II.3.A. Quantitative changes (page 86)
          • 1. Disappearance (page 86)
          • 2. Shortening and simplification (page 88)
        • II.3.B. Qualitative changes (page 89)
      • II.4. Initial Consonant Clusters (page 89)
  • Bibliography (page 91)
  • Index (page 99)
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