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This collection of essays represents a sample of Suraiya Faroqhi’s groundbreaking work into Ottoman social and economic history. In it, she looks at individuals and structures in the Ottoman provinces.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-133-9
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Oct 28,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 319
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-133-9
$162.00
$97.20

Making a Living in Ottoman Lands is a collection of essays by Suraiya Faroqhi on life in the Ottoman provinces. Faroqhi questions the notion that studying the non-peasant provincials should be done merely to understand the functioning of the Ottoman state, the activities of the Ottoman merchant class or changes in agrarian nature of the empire. Instead of concentrating on these ‘macro’ features, she opts to look at minor figures as a means of understanding how minor officials indirectly wielded greater power – even political leverage. Faroqhi is concerned in her essays with what she calls ‘conjunctural’ changes which might normally go undetected. Faroqhi addresses people within structures, such as guilds or trade networks, both for what we can learn about them and for what they tell us about the peasantry, who are otherwise poorly represented in Ottoman-era documents.

Making a Living in Ottoman Lands is a collection of essays by Suraiya Faroqhi on life in the Ottoman provinces. Faroqhi questions the notion that studying the non-peasant provincials should be done merely to understand the functioning of the Ottoman state, the activities of the Ottoman merchant class or changes in agrarian nature of the empire. Instead of concentrating on these ‘macro’ features, she opts to look at minor figures as a means of understanding how minor officials indirectly wielded greater power – even political leverage. Faroqhi is concerned in her essays with what she calls ‘conjunctural’ changes which might normally go undetected. Faroqhi addresses people within structures, such as guilds or trade networks, both for what we can learn about them and for what they tell us about the peasantry, who are otherwise poorly represented in Ottoman-era documents.

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Suraiya Faroqhi

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS (page 7)
  • INTRODUCTION (page 9)
  • THE ANATOLIAN TOWN AND ITS PLACE WITHIN THE ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE OF THE OTTOMAN STATE (1550-1590)* (page 27)
  • TOWNS, AGRICULTURE AND THE STATE IN SIXTEENTH-CENTURY OTTOMAN ANATOLIA (page 55)
  • THE FIELDGLASS AND THE MAGNIFYING LENS: STUDIES OF OTTOMAN CRAFTS AND CRAFTSMEN (page 79)
  • OTTOMAN GUILDS IN THE LATE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY: THE BURSA CASE (page 101)
  • BURSA AT THE CROSSROADS: IRANIAN SILK, EUROPEAN COMPETITION AND THE LOCAL ECONOMY 1470-1700 (page 121)
  • LONG-TERM CHANGE AND THE OTTOMAN CONSTRUCTION SITE: A STUDY OF BUILDERS WAGES AND IRON PRICES* (page 157)
  • MERCHANT NETWORKS AND OTTOMAN CRAFT PRODUCTION (page 177)
  • THE BUSINESS OF TRADE: BURSA MERCHANTS IN THE 1480S (page 201)
  • TRADERS AND CUSTOMS OFFICIALS IN 1660S ISKENDERUN* (page 225)
  • RED SEA TRADE AND COMMUNICATIONS AS OBSERVED BY EVLIYA CELEBI (1671-72) (page 239)
  • AGRICULTURAL CRISIS AND THE ART OF FLUTE-PLAYING: THE WORLDLY AFFAIRS OF THE MEVLEVI DERVISHES (1595-1652) (page 257)
  • A GREAT FOUNDATION IN DIFFICULTIES: OR SOME EVIDENCE ON ECONOMIC CONTRACTION IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE OF THE MID-SEVENTEENTH CENTURY (page 283)
  • WEALTH AND POWER IN THE LAND OF OLIVES: ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF MURIDZADE HACI MEHMED AGHA, NOTABLE OF EDREMIT (page 299)