Search
Filters
Lurianic mythology represents an intensely personal view, in which earlier cabalistic symbolism is used to express new and original ideas. The lurianic corpus can be seen as a metaphor for a relation between man and the deity which is not yet fulfilled. The cabalistic myths of his sources express the reality of the relations of being in the lurianic corpus. The lurianic system seeks to reformulate the relation of man and god, concentrating on the way that the being of the deity is revealed in man.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0395-5
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jun 26,2014
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 223
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0395-5
$36.98

Lurianic mythology represents an intensely personal view, in which earlier cabalistic symbolism is used to express new and original ideas. The lurianic system as a whole can be seen as a single metaphor for a new relation between man and the deity which is not yet fully realized. The cabalistic myths of his sources express the reality of the relations of being in the lurianic corpus. The lurianic system seeks to reformulate the relation of man and god, concentrating on the way that the being of the deity is revealed in man. The main protagonist of the lurianic myth is the deity itself, beginning with the initial contraction and culminating in the god-man that evolves in the course of the restoration of the flawed creation. The revelation of the deity is expressed in terms of the human processes of life and death and the relation of man and god is largely relocated in the realm of human sexuality. The lurianic view implies a mutual dependence between man and god, since man is seen as the revealed aspect of the deity and the deity as the transcendent aspect of man. This unity is also problematic and the unbridgeable gap between man and god is explored in the doctrine of the female waters, in which his absorption into the transcendence of the deity entails the destruction of man.

Daphne Freedman studied Cabala at Jerusalem University and philosophy at Kings College London; she received her Ph.D. at University College London where she is currently a research fellow. She has taught at London and Southampton universities.

Lurianic mythology represents an intensely personal view, in which earlier cabalistic symbolism is used to express new and original ideas. The lurianic system as a whole can be seen as a single metaphor for a new relation between man and the deity which is not yet fully realized. The cabalistic myths of his sources express the reality of the relations of being in the lurianic corpus. The lurianic system seeks to reformulate the relation of man and god, concentrating on the way that the being of the deity is revealed in man. The main protagonist of the lurianic myth is the deity itself, beginning with the initial contraction and culminating in the god-man that evolves in the course of the restoration of the flawed creation. The revelation of the deity is expressed in terms of the human processes of life and death and the relation of man and god is largely relocated in the realm of human sexuality. The lurianic view implies a mutual dependence between man and god, since man is seen as the revealed aspect of the deity and the deity as the transcendent aspect of man. This unity is also problematic and the unbridgeable gap between man and god is explored in the doctrine of the female waters, in which his absorption into the transcendence of the deity entails the destruction of man.

Daphne Freedman studied Cabala at Jerusalem University and philosophy at Kings College London; she received her Ph.D. at University College London where she is currently a research fellow. She has taught at London and Southampton universities.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor

Daphne Freedman

  • Contents (page 5)
  • Acknowledgements (page 7)
  • Introduction (page 9)
  • Part 1: Origin (page 19)
    • 1 The Origin of the Created World (page 21)
      • The First Emanation (page 25)
      • Symbolism of Male and Female (page 27)
      • Man (page 29)
    • 2 The Contraction of the Deity (page 35)
      • Contraction and the Death of the Kings (page 36)
      • The Death of the Kings in the World of Akudim (page 38)
      • The Sparks in the Vessels (page 42)
      • The Contraction of the Lower Three Sefirot (page 45)
      • Knowledge of the Deity (page 47)
    • 3 The Revelation of the Deity (page 53)
      • The Restoration of the Emanation (page 55)
      • Revelation and Concealment (page 57)
      • The Goal of Revelation is Human Consciousness (page 60)
      • Human and Divine Sexuality (page 63)
      • The Temenos (page 70)
  • Part 2: Procession: The Death of Kigns (page 73)
    • 4 The Death of the Kings and Gnostic Literature (page 75)
      • Manichaean Sources (page 81)
      • The Interiorisation of Gnostic Motifs in Later Mystic Texts (page 89)
        • A. The Objectification (page 90)
        • B. The Transition (page 92)
        • C. The Subjective Perspective (page 92)
    • 5 Female Waters, The Death of the kings and the Martyrs of the Kingdom (page 95)
      • Sacrifice and Eroticism (page 98)
      • Death (page 101)
    • 6 The Restoration of the Kigns and the Commandments (page 105)
      • The Revelation of the Deity and the law (page 111)
      • Salvation (page 114)
      • The Restoration of the Primordial Unity (page 115)
    • 7 The Death of the Kings in History (page 127)
      • Archetypes in History (page 136)
      • The Descendants of Adam (page 143)
  • Part 3: Reversion: Exodus (page 147)
    • 8 The Egyptain Exile (page 149)
    • 9 The Contamination of the Emergent Configurations (page 165)
    • 10 The Restoration of the Emanation (page 177)
      • Abraham and the Restoration of the Kings (page 184)
    • 11 The Redemtpion from Egypt (page 189)
      • The Union of the Eve of Passover (page 189)
      • The Union of the Seventh Day of Passover (page 192)
      • The Hind of Dawn (page 192)
      • The Rock (page 195)
      • The Counting of the Omer (page 198)
    • 12 Mystic Union and the Revelation at Sinai (page 205)
      • The Awakening on Passover Eve (page 206)
      • Purification (page 207)
      • Illumination (page 209)
      • Perfection (page 212)
  • Bibliography (page 215)
    • Texts (page 215)
    • Studies (page 216)
  • Index (page 221)
Customers who bought this item also bought

Gorgias Encyclopedic Dictionary of the Syriac Heritage

ISBN: 978-1-59333-714-8
The Gorgias Encyclopedic Dictionary of the Syriac Heritage (GEDSH) is the first major encyclopedia-type reference work devoted exclusively to Syriac Christianity, both as a field of scholarly inquiry and as the inheritance of Syriac Christians today. In more than 600 entries it covers the Syriac heritage from its beginnings in the first centuries of the Common Era up to the present day. Special attention is given to authors, literary works, scholars, and locations that are associated with the Classical Syriac tradition. Within this tradition, the diversity of Syriac Christianity is highlighted as well as Syriac Christianity’s broader literary and historical contexts, with major entries devoted to Greek and Arabic authors and more general themes, such as Syriac Christianity’s contacts with Judaism and Islam, and with Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopian, and Georgian Christianities.
$160.00

A Short Introduction to the Tiberian Masoretic Bible and its Reading Tradition

ISBN: 978-1-4632-0246-0
This book is intended to provide a quick introductory overview of the Tiberian Masoretic tradition of the Hebrew Bible and its background. It was this tradition that produced the great Masoretic codices of the Middle Ages, which form the basis of modern printed editions of the Hebrew Bible. Particular prominence is given to the multi-layered nature of the Masoretic tradition. The volume contains a section describing the Tiberian reading tradition, which is essential for a correct understanding of the vocalization system.
$23.40

Antitheodicy, Atheodicy and Jewish Mysticism in Holocaust Theology

Atheodic Theologies After Auschwitz
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0394-8
The Holocaust has provoked many different Jewish theological responses, yet upon closer inspection interesting commonalities can be observed between even seemingly antithetical thinkers. One of these common trends within Holocaust theology has been the rejection and replacement of traditional theodicies which explain and justify suffering, with responses centred on ideas of recovery, consolation and divine mystery. Another widespread, though largely unrecognized trend is use of Jewish mystical themes by Holocaust theologians. This study shows how the presence of Jewish mysticism can be explained, at least in part, by this post-Holocaust collapse of theodicy.
$41.30

An Anthology of Syriac Writers from Qatar in the Seventh Century

ISBN: 978-1-4632-0545-4
The Syriac writers of Qatar have not received the scholarly attention that they deserve in the last half century. This anthology seeks to redress such an underdevelopment by providing new material in English translation with accompanying Syriac and Garshuni editions to encourage further research in the sub-field of Beth Qatraye studies. It includes the work of some of the most prominent scholars in this field.
$25.00