Search
Filters
Patricia Crone reassesses one of the most widely accepted dogmas in contemporary accounts of the beginnings of Islam: the supposition that Mecca was a trading center. In addition, she seeks to elucidate sources on which we should reconstruct our picture of the birth of the new religion in Arabia.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-59333-102-3
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Apr 9,2015
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 309
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-59333-102-3
$89.00
$53.40

Patricia Crone reassesses one of the most widely accepted dogmas in contemporary accounts of the beginnings of Islam, the supposition that Mecca was a trading center thriving on the export of aromatic spices to the Mediterranean. Pointing out that the conventional opinion is based on classical accounts of the trade between south Arabia and the Mediterranean some 600 years earlier than the age of Muhammad, Dr. Crone argues that the land route described in these records was short-lived and that the Muslim sources make no mention of such goods.

In addition to changing our view of the role of trade, the author reexamines the evidence for the religious status of pre-Islamic Mecca and seeks to elucidate the nature of the sources on which we should reconstruct our picture of the birth of the new religion in Arabia.

Patricia Crone is professor of Islamic history at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Her books include Medieval Islamic Political Thought (Edinburgh 2004) and Pre-Industrial Societies: Anatomy of the Premodern World (second edition, Oxford 2003).

Patricia Crone reassesses one of the most widely accepted dogmas in contemporary accounts of the beginnings of Islam, the supposition that Mecca was a trading center thriving on the export of aromatic spices to the Mediterranean. Pointing out that the conventional opinion is based on classical accounts of the trade between south Arabia and the Mediterranean some 600 years earlier than the age of Muhammad, Dr. Crone argues that the land route described in these records was short-lived and that the Muslim sources make no mention of such goods.

In addition to changing our view of the role of trade, the author reexamines the evidence for the religious status of pre-Islamic Mecca and seeks to elucidate the nature of the sources on which we should reconstruct our picture of the birth of the new religion in Arabia.

Patricia Crone is professor of Islamic history at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Her books include Medieval Islamic Political Thought (Edinburgh 2004) and Pre-Industrial Societies: Anatomy of the Premodern World (second edition, Oxford 2003).

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
  • Bad
  • Excellent
Contributor

Patricia Crone

  • Preface (page 7)
  • 1 Introduction (page 11)
  • 2 The Classical Spice Trade (page 20)
  • 3 The "Meccan Spice Trade" (page 59)
  • 4 What Did the Meccans Export? (page 95)
  • 5 Where Were the Meccans Active? (page 117)
  • 6 What Meccan Trade Was Not (page 141)
  • 7 What Meccan Trade May Have Been (page 157)
  • 8 The Sanctuary and Meccan Trade (page 176)
  • 9 The Sources (page 211)
  • 10 The Rise of Islam (page 239)
  • Appendices (page 259)
  • 1 The Provenance of Classical Cinnamon (page 261)
  • 2 Calamus (page 272)
  • 3 The Etymology and Original Meaning of Aloe (page 275)
  • Bibliography (page 279)
  • Index (page 301)
Customers who bought this item also bought

Xenophon's Memorabilia and The Apology of Socrates translated by Sarah Fielding

Edited with Notes and Introduction by Hélène Pignot
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0614-7
Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), the younger sister of Henry Fielding, and the close friend of his literary rival Samuel Richardson, was one of the very few English women to master ancient languages like Latin and Greek. With the help of Shaftesbury's nephew, James Harris, a distinguished writer, scholar and grammarian, she embarked on the ambitious project of translating Xenophon's Memorabilia and the Apology of Socrates from the Greek. This work, titled Memoirs of Socrates, with the Defence of Socrates before his Judges, was finally released in 1762. She proved a discreet editor and a talented Hellenist, whose elegant style garnered praise from Tobias Smollett in his Critical Review. This superb translation is re-published in its entirety for the first time since the 18th century.
$36.00

Introduction to Working with Manuscripts for Medievalists

ISBN: 978-1-4632-0643-7
A short guide for studying, editing and translating medieval texts in manuscript form, outlining the technical steps for preparing a medieval manuscript for print: evaluating and describing the manuscript itself (transmission, provenance, and physical description), textual criticism (reconstruction, emendation, authenticity, dating, and authorship), and steps to preparing an edition or translation.
$27.00

A Unique Hebrew Glossary from India

An Analysis of Judeo-Urdu
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0613-0
This is the first-ever study of Judeo-Urdu, that is, the Hindi/Urdu language written in Hebrew script. It provides background and an introduction to the Judeo-Urdu corpus, presents nearly two hundred entries from one text — a Hebrew-Judeo-Urdu glossary — and analyzes the orthography, phonology, and morphology of Judeo-Urdu. Comparison is made to standard Hindi and Urdu, from which Judeo-Urdu diverges in many interesting ways.
$28.80

Princely Authority in the Early Marwānid State

The Life of ʿAbd al-ʿAzīz ibn Marwān
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0632-1
‘Abd al-‘Azīz b. Marwān (d. 86/705) reigned as the amīr of Egypt and walī al-‘ahd (heir apparent) to the Islamic caliphate for over 20 years. This book intends to revive this largely forgotten amīr and demonstrate the critical role he played in the formation of the Marwānid dynasty. The founding thesis of this study is that ‘Abd al-‘Azīz was appointed the amīr of Egypt and second heir apparent due to the legitimacy his maternal lineage brought the nascent dynasty.
$57.00