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Melilah is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal concerned with Jewish law, history, literature, religion, culture and thought in the ancient, medieval and modern eras. Contributors (2009) include Cynthia Crewe (abstract only), Dvir Abramovich, Phillip Mendes, and Elliot Cohen.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0154-8
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jan 1,2011
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 43
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0154-8
$26.45
$15.87

Melilah is an interdisciplinary electronic journal concerned with Jewish law, history, literature, religion, culture and thought in the ancient, medieval and modern eras. It was launched in 2004 by Bernard Jackson and Ephraim Nissan under the auspices of the Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Manchester as the New Series of the journal of the same name founded by Edward Robertson and Meir Wallenstein, published in Hebrew by Manchester University Press from 1944 to 1955. Five substantial volumes, each of around two hundred pages, were produced before the series was discontinued. In his editorial foreword to the first edition, Robertson explained that Melilah had been established to promote Jewish scholarship in the face of the threat posed by the War and its aftermath. The title of the journal refers to the ears of corn that are plucked to rub in the hands before the grains can be eaten (Deut. 23:25).

Contents (2009): Cynthia Crewe, 'Plant Motifs on Jewish Ossuaries and Sarcophagi in Palestine in the Late Second Temple Period: Their Identification, Sociology and Significance'' (abstract only), Dvir Abramovich, 'Feminine Images in the Writings of Amos Oz', Phillip Mendes, '"We are all German Jews": Exploring the Prominence of Jews in the New Left', Elliot Cohen, ‘The Use of Holocaust Testimony by Jews for Jesus: A Narrative Inquiry’.

Melilah is an interdisciplinary electronic journal concerned with Jewish law, history, literature, religion, culture and thought in the ancient, medieval and modern eras. It was launched in 2004 by Bernard Jackson and Ephraim Nissan under the auspices of the Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Manchester as the New Series of the journal of the same name founded by Edward Robertson and Meir Wallenstein, published in Hebrew by Manchester University Press from 1944 to 1955. Five substantial volumes, each of around two hundred pages, were produced before the series was discontinued. In his editorial foreword to the first edition, Robertson explained that Melilah had been established to promote Jewish scholarship in the face of the threat posed by the War and its aftermath. The title of the journal refers to the ears of corn that are plucked to rub in the hands before the grains can be eaten (Deut. 23:25).

Contents (2009): Cynthia Crewe, 'Plant Motifs on Jewish Ossuaries and Sarcophagi in Palestine in the Late Second Temple Period: Their Identification, Sociology and Significance'' (abstract only), Dvir Abramovich, 'Feminine Images in the Writings of Amos Oz', Phillip Mendes, '"We are all German Jews": Exploring the Prominence of Jews in the New Left', Elliot Cohen, ‘The Use of Holocaust Testimony by Jews for Jesus: A Narrative Inquiry’.

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Contributor Biography

Daniel Langton

Daniel R. Langton is Professor of the History of Jewish-Christian Relations and Co-director of the Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Manchester. He has a PhD from the Parkes Centre for Jewish/Non-Jewish Relations at the University of Southampton. He has published extensively in the areas of Jewish-Christian relations and modern Jewish thought.

Renate Smithuis

Renate Smithuis is Lecturer in Medieval Jewish Studies at the University of Manchester. She has a PhD from the University of Manchester. Her research has focused on medieval science and the Genizah collection of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester.

Bernard Jackson

Ephraim Nissan

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Plant Motifs on Jewish Ossuaries and Sarcophagi in Palestine in the Late Second Temple Period (Cynthia Crewe) (page 6)
  • Feminine Images in the Writings of Amos Oz (Dvir Abramovich) (page 7)
  • We Are All German Jews: Exploring the Prominence of Jews in the New Left (Phillip Mendes) (page 27)