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A prominent novelist, social activist, journalist, and nationalist, Halide Edib Adivar (1882-1964) was one of Turkey's leading feminists in the Young Turk and early Republican period. Memoirs is the first book in her two volume English-language autobiography, published in 1926, while she and her second husband Dr. Adnan were in exile in London and Paris having fallen out of favor with Mustafa Kemal's one-party regime. Edib describes her childhood, her confrontation with her first husband's polygyny, her divorce, and her entry into political and literary writing. Edib's account of her private life provides a unique example of a woman's individual and personal struggle for emancipation and gender equality.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 1-59333-305-6
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Publication Status: In Print
Publication Date: Sep 9,2005
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 560
ISBN: 1-59333-305-6
$165.00
Your price: $99.00

A prominent novelist, social activist, journalist, and nationalist, Halide Adivar Edib (1882-1964) was one of Turkey's leading feminists in the Young Turk and early Republican period. Memoirs is the first book in her two volume English-language autobiography, published in 1926, whilst she and her second husband Dr. Adnan were in exile in London and Paris having fallen out of favor with Mustafa Kemal's one-party regime. In it Edib describes her childhood, her confrontation with her first husband's polygyny, her divorce, and her entry into political and literary writing. Providing an account of the Young Turk Revolution of 1908, the Balkan and First World Wars, and ending with the demise of the Ottoman Empire in 1918, Edib explains her philosophy of pacifist nationalism, and her ideas on Islam and Islamic civilisation. Her retrospective account of Young Turk and nationalist politics, emphasizing the agency of Ottoman women in their fight for emancipation, aimed to redress the Kemalist account of Republican historiography, which undermined the activities of the Young Turks in order to praise the reforms of the Republican period. Edib's account of her private life provides a unique example of a woman's individual and personal struggle for emancipation and gender equality.

Hnlya Adak is Assistant Professor in the Cultural Studies Program, Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Cultures in Dialogue returns to print sources by women writers from the East and West. Series One considers the exchanges between Ottoman, British, and American women from the 1880s to the 1940s. Their varied responses to dilemmas such as nationalism, female emancipation, race relations and modernization in the context of the stereotypes characteristic of Western harem literature reframe the historical tensions between Eastern and Western cultures, offering a nuanced understanding of their current manifestations.

Series Editors:

Teresa Heffernan is Associate Professor of English at Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Reina Lewis is Senior Lecturer in Cultural Studies at the University of East London, UK.

A prominent novelist, social activist, journalist, and nationalist, Halide Adivar Edib (1882-1964) was one of Turkey's leading feminists in the Young Turk and early Republican period. Memoirs is the first book in her two volume English-language autobiography, published in 1926, whilst she and her second husband Dr. Adnan were in exile in London and Paris having fallen out of favor with Mustafa Kemal's one-party regime. In it Edib describes her childhood, her confrontation with her first husband's polygyny, her divorce, and her entry into political and literary writing. Providing an account of the Young Turk Revolution of 1908, the Balkan and First World Wars, and ending with the demise of the Ottoman Empire in 1918, Edib explains her philosophy of pacifist nationalism, and her ideas on Islam and Islamic civilisation. Her retrospective account of Young Turk and nationalist politics, emphasizing the agency of Ottoman women in their fight for emancipation, aimed to redress the Kemalist account of Republican historiography, which undermined the activities of the Young Turks in order to praise the reforms of the Republican period. Edib's account of her private life provides a unique example of a woman's individual and personal struggle for emancipation and gender equality.

Hnlya Adak is Assistant Professor in the Cultural Studies Program, Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Cultures in Dialogue returns to print sources by women writers from the East and West. Series One considers the exchanges between Ottoman, British, and American women from the 1880s to the 1940s. Their varied responses to dilemmas such as nationalism, female emancipation, race relations and modernization in the context of the stereotypes characteristic of Western harem literature reframe the historical tensions between Eastern and Western cultures, offering a nuanced understanding of their current manifestations.

Series Editors:

Teresa Heffernan is Associate Professor of English at Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Reina Lewis is Senior Lecturer in Cultural Studies at the University of East London, UK.

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Contributor

Halidé Edib Adivar

  • Introduction to the Series
  • Introduction to the Reprint: An Epic for Peace
  • This is the Story of a Little Girl
  • When the Story Becomes Mine
  • Our Various Homes in Scutari
  • The Wisteria-covered House Again
  • College for the Second Time
  • Married Life and the World
  • The Period of Political Reform: The Tanzimat, 1839-1876
  • The Young Turks
  • The Constitutional Revolution of 1908
  • Toward Reaction; The Armenian Question
  • Refugee for the First Time
  • Some Public and Personal Events, 1909-1912
  • Phases and Causes of Nationalism and Pan-Turanism in Turkey
  • The Balkan War
  • My Educational Activities, 1913-1914
  • The World War, 1914-1916
  • How I Went to Syria
  • Educational Work in Syria
  • Epilogue
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