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Midrash and the Exegetical Mind


Proceedings of the 2008 and 2009 SBL Midrash Sessions


Contained in this volume are the Proceedings of the Midrash session of the SBL's annual conferences in 2008 and 2009. This volume contains eight essays dealing with various aspects of rabbinic interpretation.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-61143-683-9
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Publication Status: In Print

Series: Judaism in Context 10
Publication Date: Nov 16,2010
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 217
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-61143-683-9
$172.32
$103.39

Contained in this volume are the Proceedings of the Midrash session of the SBL's annual conferences in 2008 and 2009. Chairs Rivka Ulmer and Lieve Teugels are the editors of this and the three previous Proceedings volumes published in this series. This fourth volume contains eight essays by leading scholars in Rabbinics, dealing with various aspects of rabbinic interpretational activity. Rachel Adelman investigates the origin of God’s footstool in rabbinic sources, based on the verse describing the theophany at the ratification of the Sinai covenant (Exod 24:10). Isaac Kalimi investigates how the Rabbis tried to reconcile the intermarriages mentioned in genealogical lists in Chronicles with the opposition against intermarriage stated in Ezra-Nehemiah. Simon Lasair studies two passages from Song Rabbah using a methodology based on an intersection of literary and political theory. Erica L. Martin focuses upon the rabbinic exegesis of the elliptical episode of Noah’s drunkenness in Gen. 9:20-25. David Nelson asserts that the text of the Mek. RaShBY is best understood as a written embodiment of the diverse pedagogical and transmissional culture within which it functioned. Jesse Rainbow states that in its emphasis on the motif of Ishmael as hunter, Genesis Rabbah 53:11 is informed by a larger typology of the rejected first-born son in Genesis. Ishay Rosen-Zvi claims that Babylonian rabbinic sources not only show a more positive attitude toward sexuality than Palestinian sources, but multiply and increase sexuality itself. Nehemia Polen investigates the practice of derashah in the tannaitic period which was a mode of communication with God rather than the application of hermeneutic rules.

Contained in this volume are the Proceedings of the Midrash session of the SBL's annual conferences in 2008 and 2009. Chairs Rivka Ulmer and Lieve Teugels are the editors of this and the three previous Proceedings volumes published in this series. This fourth volume contains eight essays by leading scholars in Rabbinics, dealing with various aspects of rabbinic interpretational activity. Rachel Adelman investigates the origin of God’s footstool in rabbinic sources, based on the verse describing the theophany at the ratification of the Sinai covenant (Exod 24:10). Isaac Kalimi investigates how the Rabbis tried to reconcile the intermarriages mentioned in genealogical lists in Chronicles with the opposition against intermarriage stated in Ezra-Nehemiah. Simon Lasair studies two passages from Song Rabbah using a methodology based on an intersection of literary and political theory. Erica L. Martin focuses upon the rabbinic exegesis of the elliptical episode of Noah’s drunkenness in Gen. 9:20-25. David Nelson asserts that the text of the Mek. RaShBY is best understood as a written embodiment of the diverse pedagogical and transmissional culture within which it functioned. Jesse Rainbow states that in its emphasis on the motif of Ishmael as hunter, Genesis Rabbah 53:11 is informed by a larger typology of the rejected first-born son in Genesis. Ishay Rosen-Zvi claims that Babylonian rabbinic sources not only show a more positive attitude toward sexuality than Palestinian sources, but multiply and increase sexuality itself. Nehemia Polen investigates the practice of derashah in the tannaitic period which was a mode of communication with God rather than the application of hermeneutic rules.

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Contributor Biography

Lieve Teugels

Lieve Teugels is Adjuct Editor at Gorgias Press and editor for the Littman Library of Jewish Civilization. She was formerly professor for Jewish Studies at Utrecht University (Netherlands). Rivka Ulmer holds the John D. and Catherine T. MacArtur Chair in Judaic Studies at Bucknell University. They are the chairs of the Midrash Session at the SBL Annual Meetings. They have both published widely in the field of Jewish Studies, in particular Midrash.

Rivka Ulmer

Rivka Ulmer (Ph.D. in Rabbinics, Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main; MA in Jewish Studies, Linguistics, American Studies; training in Egyptology; Certificate in Israel Studies, Brandeis U.) is Professor of Jewish Studies at Bucknell University, Pennsylvania; her research specialty is Midrash. She has published/edited nineteen books, including: Egyptian Cultural Icons in Midrash (de Gruyter, 2009); A Synoptic Edition of Pesiqta Rabbati Based Upon All Extant Hebrew Manuscripts and the Editio Princeps (1997-2002), Re-presenting Texts: Jewish and Black Biblical Interpretation: Proceedings of the 2010 and 2011 SBL Midrash Sections (ed. W. David Nelson and Rivka Ulmer; Gorgias Press, 2013); and numerous scholarly articles. Ulmer held The John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Chair in Jewish Studies at Bucknell University (2002-2007). She serves as the co-chair of the Midrash Section of the Society of Biblical Literature. Moshe Ulmer is a Rabbi (including a Master in Hebrew Letters) and a former attorney.

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Introduction (page 7)
  • 1. Rachel Adelman: Rhapsody in Blue: The Original God's Footstool in the Aramaic Targumim and Midrashic Tradition (page 13)
  • 2. Isaac Kalimi: Biblical Text in Rabbinic Context: The Book of Chronicles in the Mishnah, Talmud and Midrash (page 33)
  • 3. Simon Lasair: Lessons for Historiographers: Managing the Dynamics of Indeterminacy in Song of Songs Rabbah (page 53)
  • 4. Erica L. Martin: The Rabbinic Knife: Why and How the Rabbis castrated Noah (page 79)
  • 5. W. David Nelson: The Oral Orthography of Mishnaic and Toseftan Interpolation (page 101)
  • 6. Nehemia Polen: Derashah as Performative Exegesis in Tosefta and Mishnah (page 135)
  • 7. Jesse Rainbow: Sarah Saw a Hunter: The Venatic Motif in genesis rabbah 53:11 (page 167)
  • 8. Ishay Rosen-Zvi: Hyper-Sexualization in the bavli: An Initial Survey (page 193)
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