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My Nestorian Adventure in China: Account of the Holm-Nestorian Expedition


The narrative of this book relates the quest to bring a "Nestorian" monument--China's earliest record of Christianity--to the West. Holm vividly describes temples, synagogues and mosques, common natives and Buddhist priests, prisoners, soldiers, and guards.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 0-9713097-6-0
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jan 1,2001
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 380
ISBN: 0-9713097-6-0
$121.00
$84.70
"Nestorian" Syriac-speaking Christians had established missionaries in China as early as 635, missionaries who were in fact encountered by Marco Polo toward the end of the thirteenth century. In 781, they erected 'Chingchiaopei', or the Luminous Teachings, a bilingual Syriac-Chinese monument with 2000 Chinese ideographs "carved with supreme skill in matchless Tang calligraphy". The monument is China's earliest record of Christianity. The quest to bring this "Nestorian" monument to the West is the narrative of this book.

The monument was discovered by native people in 1625, but the inscription stood abandoned and deserted for centuries. During "eleven rather strenuous months" in 1907 and 1908, Holm circumnavigated the globe in his attempts to interest Western institutions in the monument. A two-ton replica was ultimately displayed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York for eight years, and later was given to the Lateran Museum in Rome where it still stands.

Holm vividly describes his expedition on caravans and houseboats. He talks of temples, synagogues and mosques; inns, houseboats and caves; common natives and Buddhist priests; prisoners, soldiers and guards.

"Nestorian" Syriac-speaking Christians had established missionaries in China as early as 635, missionaries who were in fact encountered by Marco Polo toward the end of the thirteenth century. In 781, they erected 'Chingchiaopei', or the Luminous Teachings, a bilingual Syriac-Chinese monument with 2000 Chinese ideographs "carved with supreme skill in matchless Tang calligraphy". The monument is China's earliest record of Christianity. The quest to bring this "Nestorian" monument to the West is the narrative of this book.

The monument was discovered by native people in 1625, but the inscription stood abandoned and deserted for centuries. During "eleven rather strenuous months" in 1907 and 1908, Holm circumnavigated the globe in his attempts to interest Western institutions in the monument. A two-ton replica was ultimately displayed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York for eight years, and later was given to the Lateran Museum in Rome where it still stands.

Holm vividly describes his expedition on caravans and houseboats. He talks of temples, synagogues and mosques; inns, houseboats and caves; common natives and Buddhist priests; prisoners, soldiers and guards.

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Contributor

Frits Holm

  • Introduction Letter by Professor Yohannan
  • Foreword
  • On the Grand Canal in Chili
  • Through Shantung Into Homan
  • First Taste of Caravan Travel
  • On the Road to Shensi
  • Regions of the Loess
  • The Ancient City of Sian-Fu
  • China's Foremost Monument
  • The Nestorian Inscription
  • Crossing the Chingling Range
  • A Fast Houseboat Trip
  • The Venerable City of Kai-Feng-Fu
  • Trying Return - Journey to Sian-Fi
  • Second Stay At Sian-Fu
  • Transporting a Two-Ton Monument
  • Return to the Coast
  • Fate of the Replica