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This volume contains papers on the Eastern Neo-Aramaic dialects and the languages in contact with them. The papers make important contributions to the documentation of the dialects and to the understanding of their development in the context of non-Semitic contact languages.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-0410-5
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Publication Status: In Print

Publication Date: Jan 2,2015
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 7 x 10
Page Count: 502
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-0410-5
$206.00

This volume contains papers on the Eastern Neo-Aramaic dialects (Ṭuroyo, North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic and Neo-Mandaic) and the languages in contact with these dialects in Western Asia. The papers make important contributions to the documentation of the Neo-Aramaic dialects and to the understanding of their historical development. There is a great diversity across the Eastern Neo-Aramaic dialect area, which, compounded by the fact that many of the dialects are now highly endangered, is a great challenge for researchers engaged in the task of their documentation and in the investigation of their historical background. This diversity, however, also enriches the field and the documentation presented in this volume clarifies many aspects of their historical development and relationship. The papers on language contact show that the historical development of Neo-Aramaic cannot be fully understood without taking into account the structures of the languages from other language families that are spoken in the area.

This volume contains papers on the Eastern Neo-Aramaic dialects (Ṭuroyo, North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic and Neo-Mandaic) and the languages in contact with these dialects in Western Asia. The papers make important contributions to the documentation of the Neo-Aramaic dialects and to the understanding of their historical development. There is a great diversity across the Eastern Neo-Aramaic dialect area, which, compounded by the fact that many of the dialects are now highly endangered, is a great challenge for researchers engaged in the task of their documentation and in the investigation of their historical background. This diversity, however, also enriches the field and the documentation presented in this volume clarifies many aspects of their historical development and relationship. The papers on language contact show that the historical development of Neo-Aramaic cannot be fully understood without taking into account the structures of the languages from other language families that are spoken in the area.

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Contributor Biography

Geoffrey Khan

Geoffrey Khan has recently been elected 'Regius Professor of Hebrew' at the University of Cambridge. He was elected Fellow of the British Academy in 1998 and Honorary Fellow of the Academy of the Hebrew Language in 2011. In 2004 he was awarded the Lidzbarski Gold Medal for Semitic Philology.

Lidia Napiorkowska

Napiorkowska holds a PhD in Aramaic obtained from the University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on the documentation and description of the spoken varieties of Eastern Neo-Aramaic, especially those lesser known and endangered.

Michael Waltisberg

Kathrin Göransson

Oz Aloni

Nineb Lamassu

Sina Tezel

Aziz Tezel

Eran Cohen

Eran Cohen is currently the chair of the linguistics department of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He is a linguist specializing in Semitic languages and their syntax, and has published many works on both Akkadian and Neo-Aramaic.

Don Stilo

Paul Noorlander

Samuel Fox

Samuel Fox received his PhD from the University of Chicago in 1982. His scholarly work has concentrated on Neo-Aramaic. He has previously published a grammar of the Jilu dialect and a number of articles.

Steve Fassberg

Geoff Haig

Alessandra Barotto

Sergey Loesov

Yona Sabar

Olga Kapeliuk

Roberta Borghero

Roberta Borghero graduated in Semitic Philology at the University of Torino (Italy). In 2006 she obtained a PhD from Cambridge University (UK) with a thesis on the Neo Aramaic dialect of Ashitha (South Eastern Turkey). Her main interested is Aramaic, and she has published articles on Mandaic (South Eastern Aramaic) and various spoken North Eastern Neo Aramaic dialects. Since October 2004 she has been working as a Research Associate in The Neo Aramaic Database Project, which is based in the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Cambridge.

Charles Häberl

Hezy Mutzafi

Ariel Gutman

Matthew Morgenstern

Professor Matthew Morgenstern is Head of the Department of Hebrew Language and Semitic Linguistics at Tel Aviv University. 

Maciej Tomal

Kristine Mole

Yulia Furman

  • Table of Contents (page 5)
  • Preface (page 9)
  • Abbreviations (page 11)
  • Studies in the Turoyo Verb (Yulia Furman and Sergey Loesov) (page 13)
  • Towards a Description of Written Surayt/Turoyo: Some Syntactic Functions of the Particle Kal (Maciej Tomal) (page 41)
  • Preliminary Remarks on Discourse Pragmatics in Turoyo (Michael Waltisberg) (page 65)
  • The Turkish Lexical Influence on Surayt/Turoyo: A Preliminary Selection of Examples (Aziz Tezel) (page 81)
  • Neologisms in Surayt/Turoyo (Sina Tezel) (page 112)
  • The Three /r/s of Bartella (Kristine Mole) (page 122)
  • A Diachronic Perspective of Emphasis in Christian Diyana-Zariwaw (Lidia Napiorkowska) (page 142)
  • Domains of Emphasis, Syllable Structure and Morphological Boundaries in the Christian Urmi Dialect of Neo-Aramaic (Geoffrey Khan) (page 157)
  • The History of the Future (Samuel Ethan Fox) (page 174)
  • The Origin of the Periphrastic Preterite Kem/Qam-Qatelle in North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic (Steven E. Fassberg) (page 184)
  • The Present Continuous in the Neo-Aramaic Dialect of Ankawa and its Areal and Typological Parallels (Roberta Borghero) (page 199)
  • Causative-Inchoative Alternation in North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic (Katherin Goransson) (page 219)
  • Split Ergativity in the NENA Dialects (Alessandra Barotto) (page 244)
  • The Particle WAL in the Jewish Neo-Aramaic Dialect of Zakho (Eran Cohen) (page 262)
  • More From H. J. Polotsky's Nachlass on the Verb in Urmi (Olga Kapeliuk) (page 283)
  • Christian Salamas and Jewish Salmas: Two Separate Types of Neo-Aramaic (Hezy Mutzafi) (page 301)
  • Some Features of the Gaznax Dialect (South-East Turkey) (Ariel Gutman) (page 317)
  • How a Neo-Aramaic Speaker (Avidani of Amidya) Copes with a Biblical Aramaic Text (Book of Daniel): A Survey of Mistranslations of Verbal and Nominal Forms (Yona Sabar) (page 334)
  • Folk-Narratives in the Jewish Neo-Aramaic Dialect of Zakho: The Case of Yosef Ve-Ehav (Oz Aloni) (page 343)
  • Songs of the Assyrian Mountaineers (Nineb Lamassu) (page 357)
  • Neo-Mandaic in Mandean Manuscript Sources (Matthew Morgenstern) (page 379)
  • Tense, Aspect and Mood in the Doctrine of John (Charles G. Haberl) (page 409)
  • Verb-Goal (VG) Word Order in Kurdish and Neo-Aramaic: Typological and Areal Considerations (Geoffrey Haig) (page 419)
  • On the Convergence of Verbal Systems of Aramaic and its Neighbours. Part I: Present-Based Paradigms (Paul M. Noorlander and Donald Stilo) (page 438)
  • On the Convergence of Verbal Systems of Aramaic and its Neighbours. Part II: Past Paradigms Derived from Present Equivalents (Donald Stilo and Paul M. Noorlander) (page 465)
  • Index (page 497)
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