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Minton Warren, a distinguished scholar of Roman comedy, explores the origins and shades of meaning in the Latin particle 'ne', arguing that it has both emphatic and interrogative meaning.
Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-60724-541-4
  • *
Publication Status: In Print

Series: Analecta Gorgiana 309
Publication Date: Aug 13,2009
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 34
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-60724-541-4
$37.00
$22.20

Minton Warren was a distinguished scholar of Classics, serving as president of both the American School of Classical Studies in Rome and the American Philological Association and laying the groundwork for the edition of Terrence still in use today. This paper, which proposes an origin for the interrogative particle 'ne' in Latin, is one of the publications he is best known for and suggests that the classical 'ne' has its origin in two earlier uses, one emphatic and the other interrogative. The piece illustrates not only the particular issues involved in the evolution of the use of 'ne', but also the methods by which such changes in word usage over time can be tracked and interpreted. Students of Latin will find this an interesting and illuminating exploration of a ubiquitous feature of the language.

Minton Warren was a distinguished scholar of Classics, serving as president of both the American School of Classical Studies in Rome and the American Philological Association and laying the groundwork for the edition of Terrence still in use today. This paper, which proposes an origin for the interrogative particle 'ne' in Latin, is one of the publications he is best known for and suggests that the classical 'ne' has its origin in two earlier uses, one emphatic and the other interrogative. The piece illustrates not only the particular issues involved in the evolution of the use of 'ne', but also the methods by which such changes in word usage over time can be tracked and interpreted. Students of Latin will find this an interesting and illuminating exploration of a ubiquitous feature of the language.

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Minton Warren

  • IV-ON THE ENCLITIC NE IN EARLY LATIN (page 5)
  • ERRATA (page 6)